Time Released Prozac for Dogs Approved in the UK

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):

And who did they pay to “cook the books” on this research?!! Was the same
researcher who just plead guilty to falsifying research for GlaxcoThe initial
studies done by Lilly on dogs and cats demonstrated that the animals given

Prozac began to growl and hiss within days on the drug and the behavior
continued until several days AFTER withdrawal of the medication. Those results
would indicate a contraindication for Prozac being given to dogs as they
have for close to two decades now.

The only thing new with Reconcile, the name of the drug in the US, is
that it is a time release Prozac. All the time released change does is make
it FAR MORE difficult to withdraw from. If your dog happens to be a
rapid metabolizer then he/she will metabolize the drug faster than expected and
go into withdrawal before the next dose is given. And according to FDA warnings
you could have a dog that could be going into a withdrawal reactions
of suicide, hostility, or psychosis. . . . We need to do a survey to see
how many dogs are running in front of mack trucks and trains instead of just
chasing cars once they begin taking this medication. 🙂 🙂
🙂 . . . . Back to the seriousness of this issue, this is an
extremely dangerous way for dogs and humans or any other living creature to take
a drug!

____________________________________

At the time, Steve Connell, Eli Lilly’s manager of consumer services for
companion animal health, said that more than 10million US dogs exhibit strange
symptoms from being left alone too long. [Hmmmmm and how many humans and other
living creatures exhibit strange symptoms from being left alone too
long?!!!]

‘Lilly research shows that 10.7million, or up to 17 per cent, of US dogs
suffer from separation anxiety,’ he said. ‘We’re thrilled that our first product
for dogs can help restore the human-pet bond.’

He said research showed that 73 per cent of dogs taking Reconcile and
undergoing therapy showed better behaviour within eight weeks, compared to dogs

receiving therapy alone.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1252672/A-dogs-life-set-easier-day-pet-Prozac-treat-depression.html

A dog’s life set to get easier with once-a-day pet Prozac to treat
depression

By Daniel Martin
Last updated at 8:58 AM on 22nd February
2010

A dog version of the anti-depressant Prozac has been approved for sale to
British pet owners.

The one-a-day tablet, which tastes of beef, is said to help cure ‘canine
compulsive disorder’ and ‘separation anxiety’ brought on by owners’ long
absences during the day.

Symptoms include poor behaviour, whimpering or tail-chasing.

Spaniel looking sad

Down in the doggy dumps:
Once-a-day chewable tablet, which tastes of beef, has been launched in the US to
help dogs beat depression

The drug, called Reconcile, is also designed to curb the compulsive pacing,
chewing and dribbling which its makers claim is a result of depression brought
on by their owners’ long absences.

The anti-depressant Prozac has been used to cure compulsive behaviour in
humans, and works by increasing the brain’s levels of serotonin, a ‘happiness’
chemical.

Trials involving more than 660 mentally-disturbed pets in Europe and the US
produced improvements in behaviour within eight weeks.

Eli Lilly, the drug’s US manufacturer, said: ‘Treatment for companion animals
is a relatively new area for us.’

They point to research which shows that as many as 8 per cent of dogs suffer
from canine compulsive disorder.

Prozac

Pick me up: Prozac

Critics say dogs are now being diagnosed with ‘lifestyle’ illnesses so that
drugs can be marketed to treat them.

Roger Mugford, an animal psychologist, said: ‘Most breakthroughs in dog
behaviour are achieves by carrying a tidbit and using it wisely, not by
drugs.’

Reconcile has now been granted a license by the UK‘s Veterinary Medicines
Directorate.

However, it was first licensed in the US three years ago for separation
anxiety from being left alone for long periods.

The American Food and Drug Administration said it should be taken with
therapy to modify the dog’s behaviour – and should be taken by puppies as young
as six months.

At the time, Steve Connell, Eli Lilly’s manager of consumer services for
companion animal health, said that more than 10million US dogs exhibit strange
symptoms from being left alone too long.

‘Lilly research shows that 10.7million, or up to 17 per cent, of US dogs
suffer from separation anxiety,’ he said. ‘We’re thrilled that our first product
for dogs can help restore the human-pet bond.’

He said research showed that 73 per cent of dogs taking Reconcile and
undergoing therapy showed better behaviour within eight weeks, compared to dogs
receiving therapy alone.

The drug’s website says: ‘While you may not be familiar with canine
separation anxiety, you are probably familiar with its symptoms.

‘While you are gone, your dog may do one or several of the following: chew
destructively; bark or whine; inappropriate urination and/or defecation; drool;
pace; tremble; vomit – or worse.

‘Separation anxiety is a clinical condition in your dog’s brain. Your pet is
not a bad dog. Your pet’s behaviour is the result of separation
anxiety.’

In Britain, research for Sainsbury’s Bank in 2003 indicated that 632,000 dogs

and cats had suffered from depression in the previous year.

Nearly three times as many had suffered from behavioural problems which could
be linked to depression, such as attacking furniture.

Clare Moyles, Sainsbury’s pet insurance manager, said: ‘People are leading
more stressful lives and unfortunately this can have an adverse effect on the
health of our pets.

‘Cats and dogs can be very susceptible to their owner’s feelings and if they
sense that they are unhappy they can become agitated or depressed.’

Side effects of Reconcile can include lethargy, reduced appetite, vomiting,
shaking, diarrhoea, restlessness, excessive barking, aggression and seizures in
a small number of dogs.

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Young Son’s Frightening Reactions on Zoloft, Prozac and Luvox

“I just know they will want to give him SSRI’s and I can’t let him go through that again.”

 

I’m writing to you about my son’s experience with three of the SSRI’s. First I give you permission to use this story on the Internet, but I don’t wish my name to be used and I don’t wish my e-mail address to be used.

My son was diagnosed with OCD when he was in the fifth grade. He was 11 years old at the time, but he’d had OCD for a couple of years before we took him to a therapist. He is now 17 years of age and doesn’t take any SSRI’s because of the bad reactions he had with Zoloft, Prozac, and Luvox.

The first drug he was given was Zoloft. I forget what age he began taking it but I believe he was 13 at the time. The first day he took Zoloft he began feeling much better which they said was unusual because it usually takes a week or more for it to take affect. After about a month of taking Zoloft he had bad reactions so they took him off it. After awhile they gave him Prozac and in about a month he was having reactions to it also.

He always was such a loving child, but he started to change before our eyes. He had always been so nice with our dogs and cats but now he was trying to mistreat them. We had to watch him all the time for fear of what he might do to them. He was going to therapy at the time and of course, they didn’t believe that the Prozac was the culprit. In fact the therapist told us we should call the police if he kept mistreating our pets. He said they wouldn’t take him to jail but would talk to him and tell him what he was doing was wrong.

We couldn’t do such a thing to him so we just kept an eye on him when he was outside alone. Finally, they decided the Prozac wasn’t working and decided to try Luvox. By this time he was 14 years of age. As usual the drug worked for about three weeks then all hell broke loose.

We had to watch him all the time. We had a very large dog and it loved to watch our son when he’d go out to practice basketball, but Ryan didn’t like that anymore so one day I was watching out the window and there he was lifting the doghouse, which was one of those dogloos, with the dog in it and turning it over. It scared the dog so bad that from then on whenever Ryan came out the poor dog would run into his doghouse and hide.

We also have cats and whenever they noticed Ryan coming near to them they’d run, for fear of what he might do to them. He also changed toward all of us. Sometimes if I was sitting at the table with my back to him he would come up behind me and put one hand on each shoulder and press down as hard as he could. He also did this to his older sister.

It got to the point where we were becoming afraid of him, but we didn’t let him know that. I should tell you here that Ryan’s OCD ritual consists of repetition of speech, it’s too difficult to explain, but suffice it to say it’s a very aggravating thing for him and for his family.

He depended on us to answer him in a certain way so we were drawn into the ritual with him. One day when we went to therapy the therapist pulled me aside and told me when Ryan did the ritual I should say to him that I wouldn’t cooperate with him anymore. One evening I decided I’d try it because the ritual he was going through at the time had gone on for over an hour and I really couldn’t stand it anymore.

So I said to him what the therapist had told me to say and he began acting like he was totally crazy. Believe it or not, our entire family which consists of one older brother and one older sister and my husband and myself were up the entire night with him ranting and raving and running all over the house and trying to run outside.

At one time he went to the drawer where I kept the butcher knives and got a knife out and acted like he was going to stab himself. We got it out of his hand and then he took off running to his bedroom which was upstairs. I don’t know how I did it, but I was right behind him and made it in the door before he could lock me out. It was a nightmare for all of us.

We didn’t have any sleep all night and neither did he. He talked every minute for almost twelve hours. We had an appointment with the therapist and doctor the next morning and took him in early. He was pacing in the waiting room talking constantly. He was actually talking out of his head. When we went into the doctor’s office Ryan’s therapist was sitting in the room also and Ryan didn’t even notice him being there.

They wanted to send him to the hospital but I wouldn’t let them because I didn’t want him to be drugged up even more. We quit the therapist and haven’t been back since. That was almost three years ago. I did take him off the Luvox slowly. Now he doesn’t go to any therapists because I just know they will want to give him SSRI’s and I can’t let him go through that again.

 

Years 2000 and Prior

This is Survivor Story number 53.
Total number of stories in current database is 96

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