Amby Cole vs. Eli Lilly

Eli LillyAmby Cole vs. Eli Lilly

Lilly faces another Prozac lawsuit
Tennessee widow says husband hanged himself 13 days after drug was prescribed.

By Jeff Swiatek
jeff.swiatek@indystar.com
The Indianapolis Star

The lawsuit, filed last week in U.S. District Court for the Western District of Tennessee, is the latest in more than 200 lawsuits against Prozac maker Eli Lilly and Co.  since the early 1990s.

Amby Cole vs. Eli Lilly

6/25/2002

Lilly faces another Prozac lawsuit
Tennessee widow says husband hanged himself 13 days after drug was prescribed.

http://www.starnews.com/article.php?prozac25.html,business

By Jeff Swiatek
jeff.swiatek@indystar.com
The Indianapolis Star

To read the lawsuit go to: http://www.justiceseekers.com/files/NLPP00000/060.PDF

A Tennessee woman charges that Prozac caused her husband to hang himself 13 days after being prescribed the drug by his cardiologist for chest pain and loss of weight.

The lawsuit, filed last week in U.S. District Court for the Western District of Tennessee, is the latest in more than 200 lawsuits against Prozac maker Eli Lilly and Co. since the early 1990s.

Plaintiff Amby Cole, joined by her two children, says in the lawsuit that Milton Cole’s death in June 2001 “fits the signature pattern” of suicide caused by the Prozac family of antidepressants.

Cole wasn’t seriously depressed or suicidal and “became nervous, jittery and aggravated” after taking Prozac, the lawsuit says.

The wrongful-death and product-liability lawsuit charges that Prozac causes violent side effects that are dose-related, but Lilly “chose not to pursue” a lower-dose Prozac and put a once-weekly version on the market only last year.

“Lilly did not start marketing a once-a-week Prozac until its patent rights had been adjudicated as over and it was threatened in the marketplace with a generic formulation,” the lawsuit says.

Lilly has always maintained that Prozac’s side effects don’t include suicidal or violent thoughts. In the only two Prozac civil suits to come to trial, juries have sided with Lilly.

Attorneys for plaintiffs in the latest suit are J. Houston Gordon of Covington, Tenn., and Andy Vickery of Houston. Call Jeff Swiatek at 1-317-444-6483.

Copyright 2002 The Indianapolis Star

5/17/2000 – Vickery goes after Pfizer and its antidepressant Zoloft

Another article from the Indianapolis Star on yet another case filed against
Zoloft.

Vickery goes after Pfizer and its antidepressant Zoloft

Staff Report

The Indianapolis Star

Last updated 11:01 PM, EST, Sunday, April 23, 2000

Andy Vickery aims to go beyond Prozac.

He’s sighted a new target: Pfizer Inc. and its Prozac-like antidepressant,
Zoloft.

Vickery has three lawsuits pending against Pfizer. Last year, he settled
another: a high-profile case involving Hollywood comedian-actor Phil Hartman.
Hartman was shot to death in 1998 by his wife, Brynn, who then killed
herself. Vickery’s lawsuit alleges she had taken Zoloft and it turned her
violent.

Vickery, who represented the couple’s children, said he settled the case out
of court with Pfizer for $100,000, waiving his legal fee.

The settlement, he said, “was making a statement for them (the children), for
their benefit in the future . . . to know there’s another side to the story
(of their parents’ deaths).”

Vickery recently deposed Pfizer’s scientific experts for a case in federal
court in Kansas City, where he sued last year on behalf of the parents of a
13-year-old boy, Matthew Miller, who hanged himself at home in 1997 after
taking Zoloft for a week.

The trial is set for July 18 in what’s shaping up as a pitched legal battle.

Last year, Pfizer lawyers asked the court to strike Vickery’s entire
complaint in the Miller case, calling it “impertinent” and “scandalous.”

The judge rejected the motion, though Vickery agreed to delete sections.

The clash has Vickery hankering to prod the New York drugmaker again.

“Wait until you see my next pleading on Pfizer. The next one’s going to hit
’em like a turd in a punchbowl,” he said.

“However much they didn’t like the complaint we did in the Miller case, they
will like the next one much much less.”

A Pfizer spokeswoman declined to talk about Vickery, saying, “We don’t
comment on lawsuits.”