Mother Recently Released From Psych Ward Kills 3 Young Daughters & Self

MY COMMENT ON THIS STORY: Link.
WHERE’S THE MEDIA?
No Dale you don’t get it and neither does anybody else reading these nightmares because the media is not telling you the full story. They can’t tell you the full story because if they do they lose all of their advertising money.
How do I know? Because I’ve had producers tell me that to my face before I’ve done shows on this very subject. The one that had the courage to do the show on mother’s killing their children because of the so-called mental health drugs they were being given was Leeza Gibbons & guess how long they allowed her to stay on the air after doing the show on this subject. A whole 3 months after airing the show I will post for you below.
Oprah wouldn’t touch it because her attorneys were afraid of another lawsuit like she had faced before by the Texas Ranchers after she did her show on Mad Cow Disease. That is why you don’t get the whole story. It is money driven.
THE REST OF THE STORY THE MEDIA WILL NOT SHARE
Here is the whole story! This is happening to the richest country in the world because we are the ones that can afford the drugs (“medications”) that have caused this nightmare in which we all find ourselves! The same drugs that just killed this family and caused 4 mass killings Nationwide this past week!
Michigan has been one of their targets from the very beginning because you cannot sue pharmaceutical companies in the state of Michigan! This family should be able to file a wrongful death lawsuit for these three little girls and their mother! But because it happened in Michigan they’re out of luck in obtaining any type of Justice!
ADDITIONAL CASES:
How can America be so incredibly blinded by this whole ridiculous Mental Health story they’ve made up for all of us to believe in so that they can keep us selling us their deadly drugs?! These are drugs where their own expert testified in a mass killing just like this one, where three family members were slaughtered by the mild-mannered grandfather who took only two doses of these damnable drugs. He testified that the antidepressant drug’s effect upon serotonin should be expected to produce impulsive murder and/or suicide! After hearing all the evidence the jury agreed with that expert witness (keep in mind he was an expert for the drug company, not the family!) and rendered the verdict that those two pills were the main cause of this tragedy. They awarded the family $6.4 million – hardly compensation for the loss of 4 loved ones in such a horrific manner. (If you want to look that up it is a Wyoming case Tobin vs Glaxo.)
I have been tracking and investigating these cases since 1990 and cannot believe the public has not woken up to this! In finding a case of a mother who has killed her children it is next to Impossible to find one, even one, who was not on these serotonergic antidepressant drugs when they did so! These things did not happen before these drugs affecting serotonin became so popular! They were not epidemic like they are now before these drugs became so popular! Yes, it would be wonderful if these mothers could get help instead of being handed their worst nightmare in a pill!
WHY DIDN’T THE FAMILY SEE IT COMING?
And for those of you trying to blame her family you need to go back to a case in Ardmore Pennsylvania where this time it was a father on the antidepressant Effexor who killed his wife, her parents, her daughter, and himself. If you’d like to try blaming that family for not seeing it soon enough to stop this you need to know what the wife’s position was while working for the Effexor manufacturer. Yes, she worked for the drug company supplying her husband’s antidepressant. Her job was taking adverse reaction reports for Effexor!!! Now in that position, if anyone should have been an expert in seeing something like this beforehand it would have been her! Most especially it should have been her after seeing reports that Andrea Yates, on Effexor, drowned her five children while on it! And the world blamed her husband & his mother for not seeing it either. (Rusty Yates do you want to comment on this?) The manufacturer did add “homicidal ideation” as a side effect not long after this tragedy, although you had to read to page 42 of the package insert to find that warning!)
Just scan through some of these thousands of cases we have seen from these drugs to see just how many high-profile cases of mothers killing their children involved these drugs! I have watched it explode into epidemic proportions over the last three decades.
DRUGS WHICH INCREASE SEROTONIN CAUSE EXTREME VIOLENCE
 
It is long past time to quit muddling around in all this psychobabble & look at what has been the main cause of violence in our society for decades – drugs!!! If any of you can remember the serotonergic drug PCP,  “Angel Dust”, these newer antidepressant drugs are the closest thing we have ever seen to that drug, which was the most violence producing drug the world has ever seen!  And guess how it produced that violence – Serotonin!
PS: For those of you blaming this on moral or religious issues… You need to know that these drugs cut you off from feeling hope, turn molehills8í in your life into mountains, & impair your ability to feel God or spiritual feelings. Yet, Christian women, are the highest users of these drugs & I believe were targeted with the drugs. This article explains how these drugs do that & point out the warnings we were given in the scriptures by Isaiah & John the Revelator that this would happen in our day: http://www.drugawareness.org/articles/spirituality-and-sorcery
Leeza Gibbons Show on Mother’s on Antidepressants Killing Their Children:
What is really frightening is the extent of the impact of these drugs upon our society by a commenter on my Facebook page about this case who sadly has made perfectly correct connections…
“Maybe the murder-suicides are just the tip of the iceberg of how these drugs are altering society. What if for every 1 SSRI-induced murder or suicide there are 10 cases of belligerent behavior? What if this is behind 3rd wave feminism? What if this is behind the recent “gender fluidity” craze? What if this is why dating is dead? What if this gave rise to incel culture? What if this is behind #metoo? What if we can only even begin to imagine the ripple effect these drugs have had through society, on the people who aren’t even on them, because a new normal has been set which is actually serotonin-crazed, and the people not on the drugs are so bewildered now by the world that many of them are put on the drugs simply because they don’t know how to deal with a world on these drugs?”

2,461 total views, 3 views today

Video: Marlon Wayans: Antidepressants may have caused Robin Williams’ suicide

Marlon Wayans

Marlon Wayans

Antidepressants may have caused Robin Williams suicide

Just in from our Washington State Director of ICFDA and my comment is:

“After specializing in adverse reactions to antidepressants and testifying in cases for almost 25 years I will say Marlon is exactly right. In fact I and our organization, The International Coalition for Drug Awareness, put together a database of about 5000 cases at www.ssristories.net which has been used in medical studies to discuss this reaction involving suicide as well as murder.

“In Robin’s case I fear it may have been a reaction to the drugs known as a REM Sleep Disorder (RBD) where you act out nightmares in a sleep state. Of those being diagnosed with RBD 86% of the patients are currently taking an antidepressant. Murder and suicide have both been seen in RBD. But before these drugs RBD was known mainly as a drug withdrawal state. And with Robin recently in rehab it is far too likely that there were medication changes going on which can trigger these reactions.

“Such a tragic loss for us all! When will the world wake up to the dangers of these deadly drugs?!

“When I was the expert in comedian Phil Hartman’s death and we got a wrongful death settlement for both his and his wife’s deaths I thought that might wake up the world, but no one even paid any attention. Hopefully in Robin’s passing it will wake up the world and save many lives! But what a terrible price to pay in order to learn this!”

VIEW MARLON’S STATEMENT HERE: http://fusion.net/Culture/video/marlon-wayans-antidepressants-caused-robin-williams-suicide-946529

Ann Blake Tracy, Executive Director,
International Coalition for Drug Awareness
drugawareness.org & ssristories.net
Author: ”Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin Nightmare – The Complete Truth of the Full Impact of Antidepressants Upon Us & Our World” & Withdrawal CD “Help! I Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant!”

WITHDRAWAL HELP: You can find the hour and a half long CD on safe and effective withdrawal helps here: http://store.drugawareness.org/ And if you need additional consultations with Ann Blake-Tracy, you can book one at www.drugawareness.org or sign up for one of the memberships for the International Coalition for Drug Awareness which includes free consultations as one of the benefits of that particular membership plan.

WITHDRAWAL WARNING: In sharing this information about adverse reactions to antidepressants I always recommend that you also give reference to my CD on safe withdrawal, Help! I Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant!, so that we do not have more people dropping off these drugs too quickly – a move which I have warned from the beginning can be even more dangerous than staying on the drugs!

2,049 total views, 3 views today

Drug the Victims! – The PTSD Crisis That’s Being Ignored: Americans Wounded in Their Own Neighborhoods

PTSD in city

The PTSD Crisis That’s Being Ignored:

Americans Wounded in Their Own Neighborhoods

Drug the Victims! Pharma has come up with yet another market created by their own meds! – The PTSD Crisis That’s Being Ignored: Americans Wounded in Their Own Neighborhoods

The following comment is what I responded to: Vonrock: “OK Barack here’s your chance at stemming gun violence. Help real people.”

And my response pretty much covers where they are headed with this drugging of the victims who could easily be victims of those on these same medications as they are behind the majority of shootings: “You do not stem gun violence by treating PTSD because PTSD is NOT what makes these people violent. What makes them violent are the drugs they prescribe for PTSD that already have listed (admitted – is that a confession?!) side effects of both “homicidal and suicidal ideation” and those drugs are antidepressants. Now keep in mind that “ideation” means obsessive and compulsive thoughts and actions of both homicide and suicide.

“It has LONG been known that increasing levels of serotonin produces violence out of the blue. And impairing the metabolism of serotonin (called serotonin reuptake inhibition) in order to increase the levels of serotonin can produce impulsive murder and suicide. Yes I can give you those references because I have been testifying as an expert in criminal cases involving antidepressants since 1992. The whole world needs to hear what comes out in courtrooms about these drugs! It is a public safety issue. But drug companies have made so much money of these drugs that they have bought off everyone when it comes to these meds.

“Just in the 90’s the makers of Prozac, Eli Lilly, alone paid out at least a Billion dollars to pay off lawsuits and place gag orders on those settling so that they could continue to peddle their wares.

“Ever wonder how much Pharma stock Obama owns? What about judges? What about lawmakers? What about the doctors prescribing the drugs? And who would the media get to advertise without these drugs?

“(Would be more than happy to share supporting references for any and all of those statement if anyone wants them.)”

vonrock: “Thank you! Knowledge is most important here.”

Antidepressants CAUSE PTSD and should never be given as a treatment for that because they make the condition far worse. PTSD is an anxiety disorder and Dr. Murray Essler from Australia found in a study in 2000 that those suffering various anxiety disorders have serotonin levels EIGHT times higher than normal. He immediately began asking why on earth doctors are then giving antidepressants, which increase serotonin even further, as a treatment for anxiety disorders like PTSD. There are many other ways to treat PTSD and antidepressants are not it!

Original article: http://www.propublica.org/article/the-ptsd-crisis-thats-being-ignored-americans-wounded-in-their-own-neighbor?utm_source=et&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=dailynewsletter

WITHDRAWAL HELP: You can find the hour and a half long CD on safe and effective withdrawal helps here: http://store.drugawareness.org/  And if you need additional consultations with Ann Blake-Tracy, you can book one at www.drugawareness.org or sign up for one of the memberships for the International Coalition for Drug Awareness which includes free consultations as one of the benefits of that particular membership plan.

WITHDRAWAL WARNING: In sharing this information about adverse reactions to antidepressants I always recommend that you also give reference to my CD on safe withdrawal, Help! I Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant!, so that we do not have more people dropping off these drugs too quickly – a move which I have warned from the beginning can be even more dangerous than staying on the drugs!

The FDA also now warns that any abrupt change in dose of an antidepressant can produce suicide, hostility or psychosis. These reactions can either come on very rapidly or even be delayed for months depending upon the adverse effects upon sleep patterns when the withdrawal is rapid!

Ann Blake Tracy, Executive Director,
International Coalition for Drug Awareness
www.drugawareness.org & http://ssristories.drugawareness.org
Author: ”Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin Nightmare – The Complete Truth of the Full Impact of Antidepressants Upon Us & Our World” & Withdrawal CD “Help! I Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant!”

 

1,821 total views, 1 views today

Do Not Miss This Movie – Sleepwalk With Me – REM Sleep Behavior Disorder

Sleepwalk With Me

Mike Birbiglia

This is a movie about the REM Sleep Behavior Disorder (RBD) which I have one DVD out on the subject already and am finishing up an e-book on the subject currently… My comment on the movie?

“This is a movie that should be seen by absolutely everyone!!! In 2010 there were 250 Million prescriptions written for antidepressants in America yet 86% of those being diagnosed with the potentially deadly sleep disorder featured in this movie were found to be on an antidepressant … no one should miss this movie! Mike Birbiglia has done an excellent job of presenting this now all too common sleep disorder, very funny, yet making it clear to the audience just how serious this condition can be and disruptive to normal life.”

Although this disorder has gotten much press lately as being associated with the sleeping pill Ambien, the drugs in that class are found to be in 3% of the diagnosis of RBD while a staggering 86% of those diagnosed with RBD are taking an antidepressant! Even worse is to know that RBD used to be a rare disorder and mainly found in drug withdrawal from psychoactive illegal drugs. But with 86% currently being on an antidepressant when diagnosed with this disorder in which patients have no paralysis during sleep and thus can act out whatever they are dreaming or having a nightmare about we need to be very concerned about the number of cases found in withdrawal from antidepressants.

What is the connection to antidepressants?

One theory is that it is the elevated serotonin levels that stimulate the brain stem and remove paralysis during periods of sleep.

It has been my experience in working with patients having reactions to antidepressants that the side effect of vivid or abnormal dreams or nightmares are the first sign of the manifestation of RBD.

Egbert movie review: “The hero of Mike Birbiglia’s “Sleepwalk With Me” is a stand-up comic who suffers from REM behavior disorder. One night in a motel in Walla Walla, he leaps through a second-floor window while acting out a nightmare he was having and narrowly escapes death… but has to have glass splinters removed from his legs. His doctor tells him to start using a sleeping bag to sleep in — and wear mittens so he can’t get out of the bag to act out his dreams or nightmares.

“Funny stuff, if it weren’t true….” (continue reading by clicking the following link): http://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/sleepwalk-with-me-2012

Also see the trailer: http://watch.sleepwalkmovie.com/

2,117 total views, 1 views today

ANTIDEPRESSANT: MASS MURDER/SUICIDE ANIMAL RIGHTS ACTIVIST KILLS 31 DOGS AND SELF

Sandra Lertzman

SANDRA LERTZMAN

This makes me MAD!!!! I have warned and warned and warned animal rights groups that they would have tragedies like this if they did not listen to me!!!! And most of the animals killed in this tragedy were puppies! We have had too many cases involving animals and animal abuse already. But this is terrible! How bad must it get before the world wakes up? This is just sickening!!!

Thanks to Bev Simmons for bringing this case to our attention. Because so many were saying in the comments to the article that this was an act of compassion because of how many pets need homes right now the following was my comment to them: “This has little to do with her caring for the animals and having their interests at heart. But it does have everything to do with why she became increasingly depressed since losing her son about a decade ago. They found her with the answer – prescription drugs prescribed to deal with the death of her son.

“After spending 2 1/2 decades testifying in cases involving antidepressants, writing about them, educating about them, etc. I can tell you the answer is there. Antidepressants CAUSE depression and suicide. They do not cure it. The serotonin lies are huge money makers for drug companies and complete nightmares, literally, for those who fall for the lies.

“These drugs produce horrifying nightmares and then sleepwalk. How many times I have heard the words “I acted out my worst nightmare on this drug?!” Sleep science calls this RBD, REM Sleep Behavior Disorder. Seems clear that this would have been her worst nightmare. Of those being diagnosed with this deadly sleep disorder, 86% are taking an antidepressant! But withdrawal can increase the odds of this and must be avoided by VERY gradual reduction.”

WITHDRAWAL WARNING: In sharing this information about adverse reactions to antidepressants I always recommend that you also give reference to my CD on safe withdrawal, Help! I Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant!, so that we do not have more people dropping off these drugs too quickly – a move which I have warned from the beginning can be even more dangerous than staying on the drugs!

The FDA also now warns that any abrupt change in dose of an antidepressant can produce suicide, hostility or psychosis. These reactions can either come on very rapidly or even be delayed for months depending upon the adverse effects upon sleep patterns when the withdrawal is rapid! You can find the hour and a half long CD on safe and effective withdrawal helps here: http://store.drugawareness.org/

Ann Blake Tracy, Executive Director,
International Coalition for Drug Awareness
www.drugawareness.org & http://ssristories.drugawareness.org
Author: “Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin Nightmare – The Complete Truth of the Full Impact of Antidepressants Upon Us & Our World” & Withdrawal CD “Help! I Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant!”

Original article: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2495133/Animal-rights-executive-62-dead-garage-alongside-bodies-31-dogs-helped-rescue.html?login&param__host=www.dailymail.co.uk&param_code=AQCXS-4hRifd30HkzBgmKD_w4936gCKnsMj4isFvuGz2veP4ehO2xMD1fFZFdzgXmilbhr2M0q2OZrbxyuwdKsykI93IUWX_ydg9NyAu59b8w_0zVmNGdhqaw8FC9-SVcE-sfhtoSilekNn2IGFaipFHJVIgmG0SgXFtXrUbsHmArwjZFTbNWt4NB7hxCfPWJm_YOHpza5s5SlBKT1WrgpZf2w7FbDvImfSTo_pwlk10Vuk2sh1SMw3WRYcj0Wd7pnzfekXTG0YpZUjgUrY9nqnPe-rZDcQfmWtPzb8tJJtZAzEOHzl5oeqk0qWAUoVe2EU&param_geolocation=us#readerCommentsCommand-message-field

1,993 total views, no views today

prozac/fluoxetine

prozac/fluoxetine
paul pezzack
i started taking fluoxetine a generic form of prozac in january 2006 after being attacked and having my jaw broken.at first i felt ok,i was prescribed 40mg a day.i started to notice that when i went out drinking i could drink a lot more than usual.sometimes i would miss out a tablet or not take them for a bit.i thought it was smoking and or drinking.so i stopped them.i gave up everything but gradually got worse.i stopped taking the prozac in august 2007,i began to feel very dizzy,lethargic,anxious.i went to my doctor and he said i shouldnt have just stopped but it was ok because they have a long half life in the body and therefore taper out on their own.on 24th september 07 i woke with a terrible headache and the room wouldnt stop spinning.i had been getting muscle spasms and hot flushes for a while but just didnt know why.i went to my doctor.he said i had an ear infection and gave me antibiotics.i took it for 2 days and just couldnt believe how i was feeling my body was as heavy as a rock,my head everywhere ,i couldnt think straight at all.i decided it wasnt an ear infection and it must be the prozac and i would try and get off them.i stayed at my mums house and didnt take any for 12 weeks,i would have nightmares,shaking,hot flushes,muscle spasms,rigid muscle and stiffness.,headaches like you wouldnt believe ,a pain in my back like a hot poker had been pushed in there,shaking,shivering,visual impaiment,foggy,feelings of being outside myself or looking through a fisheye lens and incredible urges that i might hurt my mum or myself or anyone else,i cried all the time.it was the most horrific time ever in my life it was everyday allday ,24/7 of pain and anguish..eventually i gave in on december the 6th after reading on the internet that it could take 6 months to get off them.i have had side effects ever since,all the effects i had originally have continued,it has ruined my life and i feel trapped.no doctor ive spoken to believes me,i went the hospital on many ocassions and almost got laughed at because they couldnt find anything wrong.they all say you cant have problems with prozac.they just put it down to a mental health problem and treat you like an idiot.i have considered killing myself many times to get away from the pain.but something in me keeps fighting and i want to be free.i have cut down to one fifth of a tablet now and my side effects are much easier to cope with,but i really feel like i have had no help or advice at all.i have never had anyone advise on how to get off it.i have just taken the tablets apart and cut it down over the past 2 years.even my own family dont think im ill,if it wasnt for my one brother and my mum,who sadly died in november 2009 .i would be dead for definate.i would have been better off being a heroin addict and recieved help and advice.if anyone can give me advice i would be very grateful.im from wales in the uk and it seems totally ignorant to these terrible drugs.good luck to all of the people who try to stop taking them and please remember no matter how hard it gets dont ever give up and give in.together we can fight these evil drugs.

1,976 total views, 2 views today

ANTIDEPRESSANT, PAIN KILLER & ALCOHOL: Soldier: Suicide Attempt: Iraq/Colorado

Paragraphs three through five read: “It did not work. He was prescribed a
list of medications for anxiety, nightmares, depression, and headaches
that made him feel listless and disoriented.”

“His weekly session with a nurse case manager seemed inadequate to him.
And noncommissioned officers ­ soldiers supervising the unit ­
harangued or disciplined him when he arrived late to formation or violated rules.”

“Last August, Crawford attempted suicide with a bottle of whiskey and
painkillers. By the end of last year, he was begging to get out of the unit.”

http://www.boston.com/news/nation/articles/2010/04/25/some_soldiers_find_no_
relief_in_transition_units/

Some soldiers find no relief in transition units

Army defends efforts to help returning troops

By James Dao and Dan Frosch

New York Times / April 25, 2010

COLORADO SPRINGS ­ A year ago, Specialist Michael Crawford wanted
nothing more than to get into Fort Carson’s Warrior Transition Battalion, a
special unit created to provide closely managed care for soldiers with
physical wounds and severe psychological trauma.

A strapping Army sniper who once brimmed with confidence, he had returned
emotionally broken from Iraq, where he suffered two concussions from
roadside bombs and watched several platoon mates burn to death. The transition
unit at Fort Carson seemed the surest way to keep suicidal thoughts at bay,
his mother thought.

It did not work. He was prescribed a list of medications for anxiety,
nightmares, depression, and headaches that made him feel listless and
disoriented.

His weekly session with a nurse case manager seemed inadequate to him. And
noncommissioned officers ­ soldiers supervising the unit ­
harangued or disciplined him when he arrived late to formation or violated rules.

Last August, Crawford attempted suicide with a bottle of whiskey and
painkillers. By the end of last year, he was begging to get out of the unit.

“It is just a dark place,’’ said the soldier, who is waiting to be
medically discharged from the Army. “Being in the WTU is worse than being in Iraq.
’’

Created in the aftermath of the scandal in 2007 over shortcomings at
Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Warrior Transition Units were intended to be
sheltering way stations where injured soldiers could recuperate and return to
duty or gently process out of the Army. There are about 7,200 soldiers at
32 transition units across the Army, with about 465 soldiers at Fort Carson’
s unit.

But interviews with more than a dozen soldiers and health care
professionals from Fort Carson’s unit, along with reports from other posts, suggest
that the units are far from being restful sanctuaries.

For many soldiers, they have become warehouses of despair, where damaged
men and women are kept out of sight, fed a diet of powerful prescription
pills, and treated harshly by noncommissioned officers. Because of their
wounds, soldiers in Warrior Transition Units are particularly vulnerable to
depression and addiction, but many soldiers from Fort Carson’s unit say their
treatment there has made their suffering worse.

Some soldiers in the unit, and their families, described long hours alone
in their rooms, or in homes off the base, aimlessly drinking or playing
video games.

“In combat, you rely on people and you come out of it feeling good about
everything,’’ said a specialist in the unit. “Here, you’re just floating.
You’re not doing much. You feel worthless.’’

At Fort Carson, many soldiers complained that doctors prescribed drugs too
readily. As a result, some soldiers have become addicted to their
medications or have turned to heroin. Medications are so abundant that some
soldiers in the unit openly deal, buy, or swap prescription pills.

Heavy use of psychotropic drugs and narcotics makes it difficult to
exercise, wake for morning formation, and attend classes, soldiers and health
care professionals said. Yet noncommissioned officers discipline soldiers who
fail to complete those tasks, sometimes over the objections of nurses and
doctors.

At least four soldiers in the Fort Carson unit have committed suicide
since 2007, the most of any transition unit as of February, according to the
Army.

Senior officers in the Army’s Warrior Transition Command declined to
discuss specific soldiers. But they said Army surveys showed that most soldiers
treated in transition units since 2007, more than 50,000 people, had liked
the care.

Those senior officers acknowledged that addiction to medications was a
problem, but denied that Army doctors relied too heavily on drugs. And they
strongly defended disciplining wounded soldiers when they violated rules.
Punishment is meted out judiciously, they said, mainly to ensure that soldiers
stick to treatment plans and stay safe.

“These guys are still soldiers, and we want to treat them like soldiers,’’
said Lieutenant Colonel Andrew Grantham, commander of the Warrior
Transition Battalion at Fort Carson.

The colonel offered another explanation for complaints. Many soldiers, he
said, struggle because they would rather be with regular, deployable units.
In some cases, he said, they feel ashamed of needing treatment.

“Some come to us with an identity crisis,’’ he said. “They don’t want to
be seen as part of the WTU. But we want them to identify with a purpose
and give them a mission.’’

Sergeant John Conant, a 15-year Army veteran, returned from his second
tour of Iraq in 2007 a changed man, according to his wife. Angry and sullen,
he reported to the transition unit at Fort Carson, where he was prescribed
at least six medications a day for sleeping disorders, pain, and anxiety,
keeping a detailed checklist in his pocket to remind him of his dosages.

The medications disoriented him, Delphina Conant said, and he would often
wander the house late at night before curling up on the floor and falling
asleep. Then in April 2008, after taking morphine and Ambien, the sleeping
pill, he died in his sleep. A coroner ruled that his death was from natural
causes. He was 36.

Delphina Conant said she felt her husband never received meaningful
therapy at the transition unit, where he had become increasingly frustrated and
was knocked down a rank because of discipline problems. “They didn’t want
to do anything but give him medication,’’ she said.

© Copyright 2010 Globe Newspaper Company.
.

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PROZAC: Young Woman Dreams of Committing Suicide: Illinois

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):

This young woman has NO IDEA how lucky she is! What she is
describing here in dreaming about various ways of killing herself after starting
on Prozac is the beginning of the REM Sleep Behavior Disorder or RBD – a
condition that was not very common before Prozac hit the market.
RBD is a condition in which 86% of those being diagnosed with
it are taking an antidepressant. It is a condition in which people act out their
nightmares and 80% of those hurt themselves or someone else in doing
so.
__________________________________
Paragraphs 13 and 14 read:  “One antidepressant user, who
asked that her name be withheld, said when she sought help for what she
considered to be minor depression, doctors immediately told her drugs
were the answer.
‘They made it seem like my world was falling
apart,’  the 29-year-old said.  ‘They really pushed hard for me to
take drugs, and
I didn’t want to, but they made me think
I really needed it. So I took them’.”

“She said that after a

few weeks on Prozac, she felt numb then started having
dangerous thoughts. ‘I became emotionless.  Like,
things that should’ve made me happy, I was not excited about. Things that should
have made me sad didn’t upset me. I started dreaming about driving my car
into a wall.’
She said that according to her doctor, these were
all symptoms of her depression, but
she thinks it was
the drugs.”

http://news.medill.northwestern.edu/chicago/news.aspx?id=154761

Researchers say that antidepressants are no more effective than placebo
in cases of mild or moderate depression.

Depressing truth about antidepressants

by Tina
Amirkiai

Jan 27, 2010

If you are one of the millions of people taking
antidepressants for mild depression symptoms, you might as well be taking a
placebo.

A study released by a team of researchers led by Jay C.
Fournier, of the Department of Psychology at the University of Pennsylvania,
found that the most commonly prescribed antidepressants do little for mild to
moderate symptoms of depression, having the same results as a placebo.

The study, published in the Jan.6 edition of the Journal of the American
Medical Association, combining previous studies with research from new clinical
trials, concluded, “There is little evidence to suggest that [antidepressants]
produce specific pharmacological benefit for the majority of patients with less
severe acute depressions.”

Dr. Paul Dobransky, a Chicago psychiatrist,
believes professionals need to look closely at each individual patient’s
symptoms and carefully diagnose the best treatment. He said there are three
angles that must be looked at when it comes to mood disorders, which he referred
to as the “bio-psycho-social” aspects.

“The biological or physical
symptoms of mood disorders are where medications are often useful,” he said.
“They cannot however, alter one’s character, personality or fix any external or
social stress the patient might be dealing with.”

Researchers used a
severity scale to evaluate the level of depression symptoms in the hundreds of

clinical trial patients, which ultimately helped determine that the
antidepressants were most effective for those with more severe disorders.

Researchers evaluated the 728 men and women, half of them had severe
depression and the other half had more moderate symptoms. They found that
compared to the placebos, the drugs caused a much steeper reduction of symptoms
in people who scored higher on the severity scale.

Researchers concluded
that, “For patients with very severe depression, the benefit of the medications
over placebo is substantial.”

Dobransky and other critics maintain that
the drug companies should be held accountable for all the advertising and sales
hype in recent years, leading directly to the overuse of drugs like
antidepressants.

In 1997, the Food and Drug Administration loosened the
restrictions on the direct-to-consumer advertising by drug companies. Since
then, pharmaceutical companies have spent billions of dollars advertising their
products to the general public.

Dobransky said a big part of the problem
is patients see advertisements and want to use these drugs as a quick fix.
According to him, patients often assume that mild cases of depression involving
stressful situational causes can be resolved with medicine. But he said quick
fixes like that do not exist.

“Each case needs to be set in its proper
place and in many of these cases, therapy between the patient and their doctor
is the best solution,” Dobransky said.

One antidepressant user, who
asked that her name be withheld, said when she sought help for what she
considered to be minor depression, doctors immediately told her drugs were the
answer. “They made it seem like my world was falling apart,” the 29-year-old
said. “They really pushed hard for me to take drugs, and I didn’t want to, but
they made me think I really needed it. So I took them.”

She said that
after a few weeks on Prozac, she felt numb then started having dangerous
thoughts. “I became emotionless.  Like, things that should’ve made me
happy, I was not excited about. Things that should have made me sad didn’t upset
me. I started dreaming about driving my car into a wall.” She said that
according to her doctor, these were all symptoms of her depression, but she
thinks it was the drugs.

“I just felt like instead of my doctor doing
her job as a therapist, she looked to some drug to cure me, which is
ridiculous,” she said. “It’s basically a quick fix, it solves nothing, and in my
case turned mild symptoms into severe ones.”

A spokesman for
GlaxoSmithKline, who makes paroxetine, sold as Paxil, told Bloomberg News that
“the study used for the analysis in the JAMA paper differ methodologically from
studies used to support the approval of paroxetine for major depressive
disorder, so it is difficult to make direct comparisons between the study
results.”

If you think you might be depressed, the Depression Health
Center on the WebMD Web site advises relying on licensed professionals trained
to treat depression who can help you chose the best course of treatment, which
may or may not include antidepressant drugs.
Dashed line

©2001 – 2009 Medill Reports – Chicago, Northwestern
University.  A publication of the Medill
School
.

1,280 total views, 2 views today

ANTIDEPRESSANT: Murder: Man Stabs Wife Muliple Times Killing Her: England

Paragraph 21 reads:  “Supt Slattery said Davidson’s
medical problems started in 2007 and he had been prescribed some
medication but  ‘clearly the
treatment and intervention hadn’t been successful’.”

Paragraph 13
reads:  “During Davidson’s court appearance on Thursday, it emerged that he
had been battling depression for some time and would sit in
bed, not wash and not help around the house. He refused to accept that he had a
problem.”

Paragraph 18 reads:  “Supt Slattery admitted that people
would find it difficult to understand how a placid, withdrawn man

who showed no hint of violence could suddenly commit
such an horrific act.”

http://www.newsandstar.co.uk/news/cumbrian_woman_who_saw_her_dad_kill_her_mum_still_has_nightmares_a_year_on_1_630860?referrerPath=home

Cumbrian woman who saw her dad kill her mum still has nightmares a year
on

By Victoria Brenan

Last updated at 12:03,
Saturday, 31 October 2009

A daughter who saw her father murder her mother
in a frenzied attack in their Penrith home lives with the brutal images every
day.

Twenty-three-year-old Collette Davidson suffers from nightmares and
sleep problems after witnessing the assault in which her mother was stabbed 50

times on August 21 last year.

She has essentially lost both parents after
her father Robert, 48, was this week ordered to be detained indefinitely in a
mental hospital after admitting manslaughter.

“I become very upset when I
think of what she went through and the horrific end to her life,” Collette said
in a statement.

“After the incident I hardly slept at all and I don’t
like being around knives. I look at them and think about what they can
do.”

Detective Superintendent Andy Slattery, who led the investigation
into the death of 43-year-old Judith Davidson, paid tribute to Collette’s
strength saying she had witnessed “the most unimaginable, horrific
scenes”.

The family had eaten a meal together before Davidson took two
knives upstairs and subjected his wife of 24 years to a sustained, brutal
stabbing in the bedroom of their home in White Ox Way. Collette overheard them
arguing – her mother had earlier asked her father to leave – then heard a scream
and a cry.

She saw her mother – whom she described as her best friend –
cornered and being stabbed by her father. She grabbed one of the knives and went
to a neighbour for help. When they returned, the attack was still
continuing.

“Collette was extremely traumatised,” said Supt Slattery,
head of the public protection unit. “She will never forget what happened but she
has been very strong throughout this, remarkably so. Right from the start she
was able to explain to officers what had happened and give a very detailed
account of what had gone on at the house.”

Supt Slattery was called to
the scene after Davidson had already been arrested.

“It was obvious from
the start that we weren’t looking for anyone else in connection with this,” he
said.

“Something significant happened in the mind of Robert Davidson and
he turned from a quiet and depressed man to being extremely
violent.”

During Davidson’s court appearance on Thursday, it emerged that
he had been battling depression for some time and would sit in bed, not wash and
not help around the house. He refused to accept that he had a
problem.

Supt Slattery described him as “very quiet and unemotional”,
even at the scene. “He didn’t speak. Not at all. In his first interview he
didn’t comment. He said very little but what he did say was that Judith was a
good woman and he loved her.”

Davidson was examined by a doctor and
psychiatrist at the police station and was deemed fit to be interviewed. He was
later assessed by three psychiatrists – one for the defence, the prosecution and
the court. All agreed that he was suffering from an “abnormality of the mind”,
stemming from depression.

“He was suffering from hopelessness and
depression. It was long-term build up of a history of mental depression,” Supt
Slattery said.

When his wife asked him to leave, Davidson was “so
depressed, so anxious” that he viewed it as “a catastrophic event”, the
psychiatrists concluded – although the court heard she had asked him to leave on
previous occasions.

Supt Slattery admitted that people would find it
difficult to understand how a placid, withdrawn man who showed no hint of
violence could suddenly commit such an horrific act.

“There was no
build-up in terms of threats or violence of any sort, no reason to believe that
Judith was afraid in any way,” he added.

“It’s something I don’t think
the family or anyone else will understand. There was clearly a degree of
planning involved and forethought in what he did. He took two kitchen knives
upstairs.”

Supt Slattery said Davidson’s medical problems started in 2007
and he had been prescribed some medication but “clearly the treatment and
intervention hadn’t been successful”.

The psychiatrists’ assessment made
it difficult to pursue a murder charge and the CPS agreed to accept a plea to
manslaughter, meaning Davidson would not have to go to trial, something Mrs
Davidson’s side of the family criticised. “We have no faith in this country’s
justice system,” they said in a statement. “It should be a life for a
life.”

Supt Slattery said Davidson’s children – Collette and Craig, who
was at university at the time of the attack – would never forget what happened.
Neither of them attended court.

They were a close-knit family and the
impact of “having a parent die at the hands of another parent adds another
dimension of difficulty for anybody”.

“They have lost their mother and
got to come to terms with the fact their father killed her in a brutal and
ferocious way,” he said. “They both found it difficult to come to terms with
what happened and to carry on with normal life.

“Collette will never
forget what happened but she has got to find a way to move on.”

Davidson,
who must remain at a secure hospital indefinitely, will be monitored by doctors
and a report produced every year on his condition and progress. His family will
be kept updated and he will be released only when no longer considered a risk to
the public.

The judge said he expected him to spend a “very long” time in
hospital.

First published at 09:11, Saturday, 31 October
2009
Published by http://www.newsandstar.co.uk

1,329 total views, 4 views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS & PAINKILLERS: Soldier Dies in his Sleep: Virginia

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy:

The first four paragraphs of this article reads like a classic
recipe for antidepressant adverse reactions, listing all of the most common and
then the reference to them being the signs of PTSD even though he was never in
combat. What is interesting is that the family understood enough to relate
it all to the drugs. And then to know that the drugs did kill him.
What they did not understand though is how much of a part of
the sexual assault the drugs might have played.
First of all false accusations of sexual assault is so
commonly reported by someone on antidepressants that for two decades I have
generally asked who the patient believes has sexually assaulted them if they
have been on these drugs more than a couple of years. The extremely vivid
drug-induced nightmares are often sexual in nature leading patients to believe
these attacks were real because they were so vivid and because the
patient can no longer detect dreams from reality while on these
drugs.
But the second component is the widespread use of these drugs
in the military and their potential to produce sexual compulsions which would
produce more sexual attacks as well as the potential of antidepressants to
produce homosexual reactions in those previously heterosexual.
So if this young man really was attacked and it was not a
delusion, the attacker may have been on an antidepressant and experiencing
the adverse reaction of mania – in particular, nymphomania-a pathological
compulsion for sex:
_____________________________________
“For years after the parachute accident that ended his Army
service, Cody Openshaw spiraled downward.

He entered college but couldn’t
keep up with his studies. He had trouble holding a job. He drank too much. He
had trouble sleeping, and when he did sleep, he had nightmares. He got married
and divorced in less than a year. He had flashbacks. He isolated himself from
his friends and drank more.

His anxiety level was out of this world,” his father said. “This was a young man who got straight A’s in high school, and
now he couldn’t function.”

Openshaw had the classic symptoms of
post-traumatic stress disorder, even though he had never been in combat. His
parents attributed the trauma to the accident and the heavy medications he was
taking for the continuing pain.

Paragraphs 61 through 64 read:  “He was still heavily
medicated, however –
with narcotics for the lingering
pain from his parachute accident and antidepressants for his
post-traumatic stress disorder.”

His first night at home,
he went to bed and never woke up.”

“The
cause of death was respiratory arrest from prescription drug
toxicity.
He was 25.”

” ‘These medications that he was on, they
build up in your bloodstream to the point of toxicity,’  his father
said.  ‘And that’s what we’re assuming happened’.”

http://hamptonroads.com/2009/10/military-men-are-silent-victims-sexual-assault

Military men are silent victims of sexual assault

By Bill
Sizemore

The Virginian-Pilot
© October 4, 2009

For years after
the parachute accident that ended his Army service, Cody Openshaw spiraled
downward.

He entered college but couldn’t keep up with his studies. He
had trouble holding a job. He drank too much. He had trouble sleeping, and when
he did sleep, he had nightmares. He got married and divorced in less than a
year. He had flashbacks. He isolated himself from his friends and drank
more.

His anxiety level was out of this world,” his father said. “This
was a young man who got straight A’s in high school, and now he couldn’t
function.”

Openshaw had the classic symptoms of post-traumatic stress
disorder, even though he had never been in combat. His parents attributed the
trauma to the accident and the heavy medications he was taking for the
continuing pain.

But there was more.

Finally, he broke down and
told his father.

A few months after his accident, as he was awaiting his

medical discharge from the Army, he had been sexually assaulted.

The
attack left him physically injured and emotionally shattered. Inhibited by
shame, embarrassment, sexual confusion and fear, it took him five years to come
forward with the full story.

What truly sets this story apart, however,
is not the details of the case, horrific as they are, but the gender of the
victim.

There is a widespread presumption that most victims of sexual
assault in the military services are women. That presumption, however, is
false.

In a 2006 survey of active-duty troops, 6.8 percent of women and
1.8 percent of men said they had experienced unwanted sexual contact in the
previous 12 months. Since there are far more men than women in the services,
that translates into roughly 22,000 men and 14,000 women.

Among women,
the number of victims who report their assaults is small. Among men, it is
infinitesimal. Last year the services received 2,530 reports of sexual assault
involving female victims – and 220 involving male victims.

One of them
was Pfc. Cody Openshaw.

Now his family has made the difficult decision to
go public with his story in the hope that it will prompt the military services
to confront the reality of male sexual assault.

As Openshaw’s father put
it in an interview, “Now that they know, what are they going to do about it.”

Openshaw grew up in a large Mormon family in Utah, the fifth of
nine children. He was a mild-tempered child, an Eagle Scout who dreamed of
becoming a brain surgeon.

He was an athlete, a tireless hockey player and
a lover of the outdoors. He was prone to take off on a moment’s notice to go
hiking or camping – sometimes with a friend, often just him and his tent – among
Utah’s rugged canyons and brown scrub-covered mountains.

He had a
sensitive side, too: He was a published poet.

He looked big and menacing
but he was really a teddy bear, one of his brothers said.

When he walked
into a room, a sister said, everyone would light up.

He also had a
mischievous streak. Once after joining the Army in 2001, he went home on leave
unannounced for his mother’s birthday. He had himself wrapped up in a big
cardboard box and delivered to the front porch. When his mother opened the box,
he popped out.

Openshaw volunteered for the 82nd Airborne Division, based
at Fort Bragg, N.C., where he excelled as a paralegal and paratrooper. But his

military career came to an untimely end shortly after the Sept. 11, 2001,
terrorist attacks.

As his unit was training to invade Afghanistan, a
parachute malfunction sent Openshaw plummeting 60 feet to the ground, causing
severe stress fractures in his spine and both legs.

For months as he
awaited his medical discharge, he was plagued by chronic pain. The medications
prescribed by the Army doctors only helped so much, and alcohol became a kind of
self-medication.

After a night on the town with a fellow soldier, his

father learned later, Openshaw returned to the barracks and encountered a
solicitous platoon sergeant.

His legs were hurting, and the sergeant
said, “Let me rub your legs.” Then the contact became violently sexual. Openshaw
– drunk, disabled and outranked – was in no position to resist.

The next
day the sergeant told him, “Just remember, accidents happen. They can happen to
you and to your family. You know, people show up missing.”

The story came
out in tortured bits and pieces.

Openshaw confided in his older sister
the next day in an agonized phone call but swore her to secrecy. He took his

assailant’s warning as a death threat.

“He was worried about me and the
rest of the family,” his sister said. “He said ‘We need to keep it quiet.’

Because of the reported threat to Openshaw’s family, their names and
locations have been omitted from this story.

He finally told his
therapist at the Department of Veterans Affairs hospital in Salt Lake City, who
referred him to a VA sexual assault treatment center in Bay Pines, Fla. As part
of his therapy there, Openshaw shared more of the traumatic episode in a letter
to his father.

“He wanted to get better,” his brother said. ” He decided,
‘I’m going to beat this. I’m tired of five years of depression. I want to feel
alive again.’ ”

A longtime friend thinks guilt was a factor in Openshaw’s
reluctance to come forward with his story.

“I think he blamed himself
because he was drinking,” the friend said. “When the assault happened, he said
he remembered laying there and he was so drunk that he couldn’t do anything
about it.

“It really affected him. He struggled even with asking a girl
out on a date. He felt unworthy.”

Trauma from sexual assault has
become so commonplace in the military that it now has its own designation: MST,
for military sexual trauma.

The VA was first authorized to provide sexual
assault outreach and counseling to female veterans after a series of
congressional hearings in 1992. As the realization dawned that this was not just
a women’s issue, those services were extended to male veterans.

According
to a 2007 study by a team of VA researchers, a nationwide screening of veterans
seeking VA services turned up more than 60,000 with sexual trauma. More than
half of those – nearly 32,000 – were men.

Those numbers almost certainly
understate the problem, the researchers wrote, concluding that the population of
sexually traumatized men and women under the treatment of the VA is “alarmingly
large.”

Sexual trauma, the researchers found, poses a risk for developing
post-traumatic stress disorder “as high as or higher than combat
exposure.”

Among active-duty personnel, the Defense Department has
embarked on what it says is an unprecedented effort to wipe out sexual assault

in the ranks.

Key to that effort, the department says, is encouraging a
climate in which victims feel free to report the crime without fear of
retribution, stigma or harm to their careers.

In 2005, Congress
authorized the creation of the Defense Task Force on Sexual Assault in the
Military Services to examine how well the services are carrying out that
mission. Its final report is being prepared now.

The task force fanned
out across the world, hearing stories from dozens of service members who had
been victimized by sexual predators. In April, at a public meeting in Norfolk,
the group saw a slide presentation prepared by Cody Openshaw’s father.

As
the story unfolded, the hotel conference room fell silent. By the end, the
staffer who presented it – a crusty retired general – was close to
tears.

It was a rare event: Of 58 stories collected by the task force
over a year of meetings and interviews, only seven involved male
victims.

If the crime is seldom reported, it follows that it is seldom
prosecuted. According to Army court-martial records, 65 sexual assault cases
involving male victims have been prosecuted worldwide in the past five years.
There were almost 10 times that many cases, 621, involving female
victims.

The Air Force, Navy and Marines were unable to provide a
breakdown of sexual assault cases by gender.

Jim Hopper, a psychology
instructor at Harvard Medical School who has studied male sexual abuse, said
victims’ reluctance to come forward is rooted in biology and gender
socialization.

Males are biologically wired to be more emotionally
reactive and expressive than females, Hopper said, but they are socialized to
suppress their emotions.

“Boys are not supposed to be vulnerable, sad,
helpless, ashamed, afraid, submissive – anything like that is totally taboo for
boys,” he said. “The messages come from everywhere. Right from the start, a
fundamental aspect of their being is labeled as not OK.”

Military
training reinforces that socialization, Hopper said. “It conditions men to
accept physical wounds, death and killing while leaving them unprepared for
emotional wounds that assault their male identity.

“When they get
assaulted, they’re unprepared to deal with their vulnerable emotions. They
resist seeking help. They believe that their hard-earned soldier-based
masculinity has been shattered. They’re going to feel betrayed, alienated,
isolated, unworthy. They feel like they’re a fake, a fraud, not a real man,”
Hopper said.

Openshaw’s father, a marriage and family therapist, fears
that the plight of male victims will continue to get short shrift.

“The
military should take a more proactive role in understanding male sexual
assault,” he said. “They need to set up some way that these young men can get
some services without feeling so humiliated. They don ‘t have to be so macho.”

When Openshaw returned home from treatment in Florida in April
2008, his family and friends were buoyed by hope that he had turned a
corner.

The two months of treatment “did a world of good,” one friend
said.

“He texted me and said, ‘I’ve learned so many things. I’ve learned
that bad things can happen to good people, and it’s not their fault.’

“He was so excited to come home,” a sister said. “He was planning a big
party. He wanted everybody to see he was better.”

He was still heavily
medicated, however – with narcotics for the lingering pain from his parachute
accident and antidepressants for his post-traumatic stress disorder.

His

first night at home, he went to bed and never woke up.

The cause of death
was respiratory arrest from prescription drug toxicity. He was 25.

“These
medications that he was on, they build up in your bloodstream to the point of
toxicity,” his father said. “And that’s what we’re assuming happened.”

He
does not think his son committed suicide.

“I have nine children,
including Cody, and 15 grandchildren,” he said. “Cody had made arrangements for
them all to come over the next day. There was absolutely nothing in his affect
or demeanor that would suggest that he would kill himself.”

He is buried
beside a pine tree on a flat, grassy hilltop in the shadow of his beloved
mountains. His gravestone is adorned by U.S. flags, flowers and cartoon bird
figures recalling his whimsical streak.

A year later, his death remains
an open wound for the family. One younger brother is “very angry with God,” his

father said. He refuses to visit the grave.

Openshaw’s young nieces and
nephews still talk about him and ask when he’s coming over to play.

“Kids
loved him to pieces,” his mother said. “He affected everybody he
met.”

She, like her husband, hopes her son’s story will prompt the
military services to take male sexual assault more seriously: “Something needs
to be done so other service members and their families don’t have to go through
this.”

The Army Criminal Investigation Command investigated the case, but
with the victim dead and no eyewitnesses, the initial conclusion was that there
was insufficient evidence to prosecute.

The suspect has been questioned
but remains on active duty. He has been recently deployed in Iraq.

If the
case is not prosecuted, the suspect may be subject to administrative
sanctions.

Louis Iasiello, a retired rear admiral and chief of Navy
chaplains who co-chairs the sexual assault task force, said that when commanding
officers take the crime seriously, victims – whether male or female – are more
likely to come forward.

“The command really does set the tone,” he said.
In places where the command set a positive tone and also set a zero tolerance
toward this crime, it was very obvious that people felt more comfortable coming
forward and reporting an incident and getting the help they needed to begin the
healing process.”

In the Openshaw case, that clearly didn’t happen, said
Thomas Cuthbert, the task force staffer who presented the story in

Norfolk.

At the time of his attack, Openshaw was in a holding unit at
Fort Bragg for soldiers awaiting medical discharge.

“Instead of
protecting him while he was being treated, he was left alone and subject to a
predator,” said Cuthbert, a retired brigadier general.

“The kid was not
in a position where he was fully capable of defending himself, and he got hurt
by some hoodlum wearing a uniform. Any Army officer worth his salt, looking at
those facts, would get angry.

“He needed help, and instead he received
abuse of the worst kind. Leadership can’t prevent all crime. But when someone in

authority takes advantage of a subordinate, leadership should be held
accountable.”

If the services are serious about coming to grips with male
sexual assault, Cuthbert said, there is still much work to be done.

If it
can happen to a talented, promising soldier in the 82nd Airborne, he said,
plenty of others who aren’t as independent or as capable of taking care of
themselves also are at risk.

“Nobody in uniform is very happy talking
about this issue. They don’t want to publicly admit it’s there, although we all
know it’s there.”

Bill Sizemore, (757) 446-2276,
bill.sizemore@pilotonline.com

1,258 total views, 1 views today