AUSTIN STATESMAN – UNCOUNTED CASUALTIES: IRAQ VETS: HOME, BUT NOT SAFE

Scores of recent Texas war veterans have died of overdoses, suicide and vehicle crashes, investigation finds

1 jwj Dead Veterans day1 drugs[1]

Daniel Pilgrim, 12 , and his grandparents Randy and Judy Pilgrim visit the grave of Daniel’s father, Lance.

10 jwj Dead Veterans day1 drugs[1]

Kimberly Mitchell weeps at the grave of her husband, Chad Mitchell, who died of an accidental prescription drug overdose.

The Austin Statesman ran an incredibly well done & way overdue article today on what is happening to our veterans!!! True investigative reporting – something I thought had died an untimely death in this country! Thank you Austin Stateman!

For the past 20 years I have directed the International Coalition for Drug Awareness, www.drugawareness.org, to track these cases because so many are directly related to the massive use of antidepressants by our military. We have many cases documented in a database put together by our Texas Director which you can find at www.SSRIstories.com

Suicide, homicide, alcoholism & REM Sleep Behavior Disorder

These drugs are being given to a population generally within the age group (under 25) who the FDA has warned has double the chance of suicide if they take an antidepressant. They are dying in their sleep due to interactions between antidepressants & pain killers, or becoming alcoholic as antidepressants produce overwhelming cravings for alcohol. We have been seeing far too many veterans come home & commit murder/suicide on these drugs, or commit mass murders. Many remain unaware that antidepressants have not just suicidal ideation as an increased side effect, but also homicidal ideation. Ideation is constant ruminating thoughts or almost a compulsion … so these are increased compulsions or thoughts that will not be quieted about either killing themselves or others or both. They are even more dangerous for veterans because of the fact that 86% of those diagnosed with REM Sleep Behavior Disorder, where you act out nightmares in a sleepwalk state – some driving many miles to kill others, are those taking antidepressants. Anyone knows that someone recently returning from war is going to have nightmares worse than most. The problems due to meds are absolutely staggering.

Eric Harris unqualified for military service due to antidepressant use

All of this is absolutely insane when you see the changes in policy from just over a decade ago when anyone on one of these drugs would be turned away from the military because they did not want someone on a mind altering drug (especially those that can produce suicide, homicide & paranoia) carrying a gun in a war situation. The use of an antidepressant is why Eric Harris, one of the Columbine shooters, was turned down by the military in 1999. Seeing the extreme dangers can be made obvious in the case of Sgt. John Michael Russel of Sherman while having a toxic reaction to his antidepressant opened fire at a mental health clinic in Iraq killing 5 fellow soldiers. And as more comes out in similar cases we will see these drugs were involved in them as well.

Stan White, a father with a mission

Stan White is a father who has been fighting to get the truth out about what these drugs are doing to our troops. He lost one son in combat & the other to a medication interaction after he returned home. I would hope that families contact him & join together to put an end to this nightmare. You are welcome to find him as one of my friends on Facebook if you cannot find him otherwise.

www.statesman.com/news/news/local-military/texas-war-veteran-deaths-studied/nSPJs/

To read a more extensive report on this problem following are the follow-up stories in the Austin Statesman:

Loved ones cope with veterans’ suicides

Uncounted Casualties: Part II

_______________________________________

Prescription drug abuse, overdoses haunt veterans seeking relief from physical, mental pain

_____________________________________

Which veterans are at highest risk for suicide?

_______________________________________

Suicide among veterans receiving less attention than active-duty deaths

Many family members noticed dramatic changes in their loved ones after they returned from the war and before committing suicide.

_________________________________________

After returning home, many veterans get into motor vehicle accidents

Some say risky driving is related to their time spent overseas.

______________________________________________

About the Author: Ann Blake-Tracy is the author of PROZAC: PANACEA OR PANDORA?, and the director of the International Coalition For Drug Awareness [www.drugawareness.org]. She has testified before the FDA and testifies as an expert in legal cases involving serotonergic medications.

Ann Blake Tracy, Executive Director,

International Coalition for Drug Awareness
www.drugawareness.org & www.SSRIstories.com
Author: “Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin Nightmare – The Complete Truth of the Full Impact of Antidepressants Upon Us & Our World” & Safe Withdrawal CD “Help! I Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant!”

BOOK: Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin Nightmare! Anything you ever wanted to know about antidepressants is there along with everything drug companies hope you never find out about these drugs. SAFE WITHDRAWAL CD “Help! I Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant!” on how to safely withdraw from antidepressants & most psychiatric medications is saving lives! Available at www.drugawareness.org

BOOK TESTIMONIALS:

“VERY BOLD AND INFORMATIVE”

“PRICELESS INFORMATION THAT IS GIVING ME BACK TO ME”

“THE ABSOLUTE BEST REFERENCE FOR ANTIDEPRESSANT DRUGS”

“WELL DOCUMENTED & SCIENTIFICALLY RESEARCHED”

“I was stunned at the amount of research Ann Blake-Tracy has done on this subject. Few researchers go to as much trouble aggressively gathering information on the adverse reactions of Prozac, Zoloft and other SSRIs.”

WITHDRAWAL HELP CD TESTIMONIALS:

“Ann, I just wanted to let you know from the bottom of my heart how grateful I am God placed you in my life. I am now down to less than 2 mg on my Cymbalta and I have never felt better. I am finally getting my life back. I can feel again and colors have never been brighter. Thanks for all that you do!!” … Amber Weber

“Used your method of weaning off of SSRI’s and applied it to Ambien. Took 6 months but had been on 15 mg for years so what was another 6 months. I have been sleeping without it for 2 weeks and it is the first time I have been able to sleep drug free for 15 years. What a relief to be able to lay down and sleep when I need or want to. Ambien may be necessary for people at times but doctors giving a months worth of it at a time with unlimited refills is a prescription for disaster. It is so damn easy to become dependent on. Thanks for your council Ann.”… Mark Hill

“I’m so thankful for Ann Blake-Tracy and all her work. Also for taking the time out to talk to me and educate everyone! She has been a blessing to me during this awful time of antidepressant hell!” … Antoinette Beck

 

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BAN ON DRIVING FOR ANTIDEPRESSANT USERS? STUDY INDICATES 70% INCREASED RISK OF ACCIDENTS

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As usual early warnings about driving risks went unheeded.

FINALLY someone has done a study to investigate the problems with antidepressants & car accidents….and it only took 25 years since the drugs were introduced to get around to someone doing it! Let’s put it on record here that I approached a group focusing on prescription drug DUIs in 1991 asking them to seriously consider looking at the problems with Prozac & driving. Obviously it fell on deaf ears as so many other warnings I have given over the years.

When I first began interviewing patients about their reactions to the SSRI antidepressants in the early 90’s I stopped driving on freeways whenever possible. Why? Because patient after patient reported that although back then it was not allowed for pilots to fly planes while on SSRIs, they while on Prozac were:

#1 “flying their cars” down freeways,

#2 “having compulsions to ram other cars” as they drove the freeway, and

#3 “dreaming while driving” and having little recollection of how they got from Point A to Point B.

I also began watching my rear view mirror closely to make sure no one dreaming on Prozac had neglected to include my car in their dream so that they could react properly & allow for it being in front of them.  And  I began watching for cars coming at me going the wrong direction since so many attempted suicide reports came in of crossing into oncoming traffic & driving on the wrong side of the road to attempt suicide.

I would also encourage you to read the Road Rage document written by Rosie Meysenburg & posted in the mid 90’s on our www.drugawareness.org website.

From this recent study we learn:

“They have found that taking common antidepressants such as Prozac and Seroxat [Paxil] heightens the risk by 70 per cent.

AND in looking at drugs like Xanax, Valium, Ambien, & the newer atypical antipsychotics like Zyban, Abilify, Geodon, Risperdol, etc. the antidepressants are far worse: “Those taking a common group of antidepressants known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) which include Prozac and Seroxat [Paxil] were 72 per cent more at risk.”

But what if someone had just started on an antidepressant?

According to the study: “Even patients who have only been on the pills for a few hours are far more likely to have a crash if they get behind the wheel.”

Now keep in mind that patients are told when they are given an antidepressant that it will take two weeks before the “beneficial” effects begin to appear. Bear in mind that the adverse effects DO NOT wait two weeks to appear. This is one example. The Paxil-induced murder/suicide case of Donald Schell is another glaring example after the jury ruled after hearing all the evidence (which few have ever heard), that taking only two Paxil pills over two days was the main cause of him shooting his wife, daughter, infant granddaughter, & himself. (Read more on this case called Tobin vs Glaxo Smith Kline at www.justiceseekers.com)

Two years ago I got a report out of Utah where the officer in a Ogden, Utah area reported that in a one month period he had 150 DUIs issued. ONE of those involved alcohol & all the rest were prescription drugs! But many remain unaware that you can face a DUI for driving while taking one of these medications. And now these researchers were so completely appalled by what they found in the way of impairment of driving skills by antidepressants that they are recommending that users be banned from driving!

Ban all antidepressant users from driving?

“Researchers say the study shows that doctors should be banning patients from getting behind the wheel as soon as they put them on a course of drugs.”

Now that would certainly clear up traffic congestion in Utah, Oregon, Washington, Michigan, Florida, & North Carolina – long known as hot spots for these meds! But the use of these drugs is so widespread at this point it would likely clear the traffic nationwide & if imposed in Australia, 25% of the Australian parliament would have to take a cab to work. I am sure far more American law makers would have to do the same!

What is even more frightening to consider is that truck drivers, bus drivers, taxi drivers, and now pilots are allowed to take these medications that severely impair driving skills.

Revisiting Princess Di’s Death

Remember that Princess Di’s driver, Henri Paul was on Prozac. When I saw his blood alcohol level of three times the legal limit coupled with the reports from his family that he was not a drinker yet was drinking hard enough to be on a medication like antabuse, I knew he had to be taking Prozac. It was the only thing that added up. (See my article on SSRIs & alcohol cravings as an excerpt from my book just below the book picture at www.drugawareness.org)

So I called the police in Paris & explained that Prozac was the only thing I knew that would cause someone to crave alcohol like that & raise the level of alcohol so high in a man who was reportedly a non-drinker. The following week the Paris police announced publicly that they had confirmed that Henri Paul was indeed on Prozac at the time of the crash that took the lives of Princess Di & Dodi Al-Fayed. This report only adds to my conclusion that Prozac was the main cause for their deaths with the chances of an accident being increased by 70% with Prozac alone & who knows by what percent with the alcohol cravings producing a synergistic effect between the alcohol & Prozac & forcing the blood alcohol content even higher than normal.

Was there a failure to warn by manufacturers? Without a doubt!

“Although some manufacturers put warning notices on boxes telling patients their judgment may be impaired, they don’t specifically tell them not to drive.
“But it is now thought that the same chemical changes that improve mood among those who take the pills also slows down reaction times.”

That last sentence should read: “But it is now thought that the same chemical changes that DESTROY mood among those who take the pills also slows down reaction times.” But if they have not yet read my book, Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? Our Serotonin Nightmare they likely are not yet aware of that fact either.

Read full article here: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2202434/Taking-Prozac-Don-t-drive-Pills-raise-risk-having-accident-70.html#ixzz26ln3sPqE

About the Author: Ann Blake-Tracy is the author of PROZAC: PANACEA OR PANDORA?, and the director of the International Coalition For Drug Awareness [www.drugawareness.org]. She has testified before the FDA and testifies as an expert in legal cases involving serotonergic medications.

Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive Director,

International Coalition for Drug Awareness
www.drugawareness.org & www.SSRIstories.com
Author: “Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin Nightmare – The Complete Truth of the Full Impact of Antidepressants Upon Us & Our World” & Safe Withdrawal CD “Help! I Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant!”

BOOK: Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin Nightmare! Anything you ever wanted to know about antidepressants is there along with everything drug companies hope you never find out about these drugs. SAFE WITHDRAWAL CD “Help! I Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant!” on how to safely withdraw from antidepressants & most psychiatric medications is saving lives! Available at www.drugawareness.org

BOOK TESTIMONIALS:

“VERY BOLD AND INFORMATIVE”

“PRICELESS INFORMATION THAT IS GIVING ME BACK TO ME”

“THE ABSOLUTE BEST REFERENCE FOR ANTIDEPRESSANT DRUGS”

“WELL DOCUMENTED & SCIENTIFICALLY RESEARCHED”

“I was stunned at the amount of research Ann Blake-Tracy has done on this subject. Few researchers go to as much trouble aggressively gathering information on the adverse reactions of Prozac, Zoloft and other SSRIs.”

WITHDRAWAL HELP CD TESTIMONIALS:

“Ann, I just wanted to let you know from the bottom of my heart how grateful I am God placed you in my life. I am now down to less than 2 mg on my Cymbalta and I have never felt better. I am finally getting my life back. I can feel again and colors have never been brighter. Thanks for all that you do!!” … Amber Weber

“Used your method of weaning off of SSRI’s and applied it to Ambien. Took 6 months but had been on 15 mg for years so what was another 6 months. I have been sleeping without it for 2 weeks and it is the first time I have been able to sleep drug free for 15 years. What a relief to be able to lay down and sleep when I need or want to. Ambien may be necessary for people at times but doctors giving a months worth of it at a time with unlimited refills is a prescription for disaster. It is so damn easy to become dependent on. Thanks for your council Ann.”… Mark Hill

“I’m so thankful for Ann Blake-Tracy and all her work. Also for taking the time out to talk to me and educate everyone! She has been a blessing to me during this awful time of antidepressant hell!” … Antoinette Beck

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ZOLOFT Withdrawal: Murder: Idaho

Paragraph one reads: “On May 28, 2002, Briggs pleaded guilty to one count
of murder in the first degree, Idaho Code § 18-4003(a), and two counts of
aggravated battery, I.C. §§ 18-903, 18-907(b). After being sentenced to a
unified term of life imprisonment with twenty-five years determinate for the
murder conviction and several lesser concurrent sentences for the battery
convictions, he appealed the sentences as excessive. On May 15, 2003, this
Court affirmed the sentences in an unpublished opinion. State v. Briggs,
Docket No. 28867 (Ct. App. May 15, 2003). A remittitur issued on June 6,
2003.”

Paragraph three reads: “Briggs appealed the summary dismissal of his
petition in regard to two grounds­that counsel was ineffective for failing
to investigate and subpoena seven possible witnesses for the sentencing
hearing and that counsel was ineffective for failing to investigate and
present evidence on the effects of Briggs’s alleged withdrawal from Zoloft (a
prescription medication) at the time of the underlying crime. In an
unpublished opinion, this Court affirmed the district court’s summary dismissal,
Briggs v. State, Docket No. 32502 (Ct. App. Feb. 28, 2007), holding that Briggs
had failed to present evidence of what the testimony of the seven
individuals would have been or how that testimony would have mitigated his
sentence, and failed to present evidence of what facts would have been uncovered as
a result of further investigation into Briggs’s withdrawal from Zoloft or
how those facts would affect a sentencing hearing. A remittitur issued on
March 22, 2007.”

http://www.leagle.com/unsecure/page.htm?shortname=inidco20100414262

BRIGGS v. STATE

TODD ROBERT BRIGGS, Petitioner-Appellant,
v.
STATE OF IDAHO, Respondent.

Docket No. 35530.

Court of Appeals of Idaho.

Filed April 14, 2010.

Todd R. Briggs, Boise, pro se appellant.

Hon. Lawrence G. Wasden, Attorney General; Kenneth K. Jorgensen, Deputy
Attorney General, Boise, for respondent.

THIS IS AN UNPUBLISHED OPINION AND SHALL NOT BE CITED AS AUTHORITY
GUTIERREZ, Judge.

Todd Robert Briggs appeals from the district court’s summary dismissal of
his successive petition for post-conviction relief. We affirm.

I.

FACTS AND PROCEDURE
On May 28, 2002, Briggs pleaded guilty to one count of murder in the first
degree, Idaho Code § 18-4003(a), and two counts of aggravated battery,
I.C. §§ 18-903, 18-907(b). After being sentenced to a unified term of life
imprisonment with twenty-five years determinate for the murder conviction and
several lesser concurrent sentences for the battery convictions, he appealed
the sentences as excessive. On May 15, 2003, this Court affirmed the
sentences in an unpublished opinion. State v. Briggs, Docket No. 28867 (Ct. App.
May 15, 2003). A remittitur issued on June 6, 2003.

Briggs filed a pro se petition for post-conviction relief on April 30,
2004, asserting several constitutional violations as well as multiple claims
of ineffective assistance of counsel. The sole evidence submitted in support
was an affidavit executed by Briggs on April 13, 2004. Counsel was
subsequently appointed and on August 16, 2005, Briggs­through
counsel­filed an amended petition for post-conviction relief asserting six instances of
ineffective assistance of trial counsel. Again, the only evidence filed in
support of the petition was an affidavit executed by Briggs on August 16,
2005. The state filed a motion for summary dismissal and after the parties
agreed to forego argument on the motion, the district court issued a
memorandum decision and order granting the motion on October 25, 2005, finding
that Briggs had failed to state specifically how his counsel’s performance
was deficient or how the alleged deficient performance was prejudicial to him.

Briggs appealed the summary dismissal of his petition in regard to two
grounds­that counsel was ineffective for failing to investigate and
subpoena seven possible witnesses for the sentencing hearing and that counsel was
ineffective for failing to investigate and present evidence on the effects
of Briggs’s alleged withdrawal from Zoloft (a prescription medication) at
the time of the underlying crime. In an unpublished opinion, this Court
affirmed the district court’s summary dismissal, Briggs v. State, Docket No.
32502 (Ct. App. Feb. 28, 2007), holding that Briggs had failed to present
evidence of what the testimony of the seven individuals would have been or how
that testimony would have mitigated his sentence, and failed to present
evidence of what facts would have been uncovered as a result of further
investigation into Briggs’s withdrawal from Zoloft or how those facts would
affect a sentencing hearing. A remittitur issued on March 22, 2007.

Briggs filed a second pro se petition for post-conviction relief on
December 10, 2007, asserting that his post-conviction counsel was ineffective for
failing to prove that his trial counsel’s ineffective assistance had
prejudiced him, for failing to assert certain due process violations, for
failing to assert that he had been denied his right to confront witnesses, and
for failing to present oral argument on the state’s motion for summary
dismissal. In support, he filed an affidavit executed by him. The state filed a
motion for summary dismissal, contending, among other things, that such a su
ccessive petition is not allowed and that Briggs failed to provide any
evidentiary basis to support his claims. After a hearing, the district court
granted the motion. Briggs now appeals.

II.

ANALYSIS
Briggs contends that the district court erred in summarily dismissing his
successive petition for post-conviction relief. All grounds for relief
available to an applicant under the Uniform Post-Conviction Procedure Act must
be raised in an applicant’s original, supplemental, or amended application.
I.C. § 19-4908. The language of Section 19-4908 prohibits successive
applications in those cases where the applicant “knowingly, voluntarily and
intelligently” waived the grounds for relief sought in the successive
application or offers no “sufficient reason” for omitting those grounds in the
original application. Baker v. State, 142 Idaho 411, 420, 128 P.3d 948, 957 (Ct.
App. 2005) (citing Palmer v. Dermitt, 102 Idaho 591, 593, 635 P.2d 955,
957 (1981)). However, Section 19-4908 allows an applicant to raise a ground
for relief, which was addressed in a former application, if he or she can
demonstrate sufficient reason why that ground was inadequately raised or
presented in the initial post-conviction action. Baker, 142 Idaho at 420, 128
P.3d at 957; Hernandez v. State, 133 Idaho 794, 798, 992 P.2d 789, 793 (Ct.
App. 1999). A showing that a claim was not adequately presented in the
first post-conviction action due to the ineffective assistance of prior
post-conviction counsel provides sufficient reason for permitting issues that were
inadequately presented to be presented in a subsequent application for
post-conviction relief. Id. A petitioner has the burden of providing the
district court with factual reasons upon which the court could conclude there
was a “sufficient reason” why the grounds for relief asserted in his second
petition were “not asserted or were inadequately raised in the original,
supplemental or amended application.” Hooper v. State, 127 Idaho 945, 948, 908
P.2d 1252, 1255 (Ct. App. 1995) (citing I.C. § 19-4908).

On appeal, Briggs contends that post-conviction counsel inadequately
presented his contentions of ineffective assistance of his trial counsel in his
first post-conviction petition. Specifically, he contends that his
post-conviction counsel failed to comply with the second Strickland prong[ 1 ] to
show prejudice stemming from trial counsel’s alleged ineffectiveness where
trial counsel was operating under an alleged conflict of interest and was
not death-penalty certified, where trial counsel did not utilize
court-allocated funds to investigate possible defenses including the possibility that
Briggs’s withdrawal from Zoloft may have been the source of his violent
behavior, and where trial counsel did not “confront” several sentencing hearing
witnesses.

In Wolfe v. State, 113 Idaho 337, 743 P.2d 990 (Ct. App. 1987), this Court
noted that in examining a successive petition, while I.C. § 19-4908
permits an inquiry into why the applicant’s attorney on the first application did
not fully present his client’s grounds for relief, the ultimate focus of
the proceeding would remain on whether the second application has raised not
merely a question of counsel’s performance but substantive grounds for
relief from the conviction and sentence. Id. at 339, 743 P.2d at 992 (emphasis
added). Thus, adopting the approach followed in Wolfe, we examine the
claims raised by Briggs to determine whether he has set forth any “ground for
relief . . . which for sufficient reason was not asserted or was
inadequately raised in the original . . . application.” I.C. § 19-4908. See also
Nguyen v. State, 126 Idaho 494, 887 P.2d 39 (Ct. App. 1994).

An application for post-conviction relief initiates a proceeding that is
civil in nature. State v. Bearshield, 104 Idaho 676, 678, 662 P.2d 548, 550
(1983); Clark v. State, 92 Idaho 827, 830, 452 P.2d 54, 57 (1969); Murray v.
State, 121 Idaho 918, 921, 828 P.2d 1323, 1326 (Ct. App. 1992). Like a
plaintiff in a civil action, the applicant must prove by a preponderance of
evidence the allegations upon which the request for post-conviction relief is
based. I.C. § 19-4907; Russell v. State, 118 Idaho 65, 67, 794 P.2d 654,
656 (Ct. App. 1990). An application for post-conviction relief differs from
a complaint in an ordinary civil action. An application must contain much
more than “a short and plain statement of the claim” that would suffice for
a complaint under I.R.C.P. 8(a)(1). Rather, an application for
post-conviction relief must be verified with respect to facts within the personal
knowledge of the applicant, and affidavits, records or other evidence supporting
its allegations must be attached, or the application must state why such
supporting evidence is not included with the application. I.C. § 19-4903. In
other words, the application must present or be accompanied by admissible
evidence supporting its allegations, or the application will be subject to
dismissal.

Idaho Code Section 19-4906 authorizes summary disposition of an
application for post-conviction relief, either pursuant to motion of a party or upon
the court’s own initiative. Summary dismissal of an application pursuant to
I.C. § 19-4906 is the procedural equivalent of summary judgment under
I.R.C.P. 56. Summary dismissal is permissible only when the applicant’s
evidence has raised no genuine issue of material fact which, if resolved in the
applicant’s favor, would entitle the applicant to the requested relief. If
such a factual issue is presented, an evidentiary hearing must be conducted.
Gonzales v. State, 120 Idaho 759, 763, 819 P.2d 1159, 1163 (Ct. App. 1991);
Hoover v. State, 114 Idaho 145, 146, 754 P.2d 458, 459 (Ct. App. 1988);
Ramirez v. State, 113 Idaho 87, 89, 741 P.2d 374, 376 (Ct. App. 1987).
Summary dismissal of an application for post-conviction relief may be
appropriate, however, even where the state does not controvert the applicant’s
evidence because the court is not required to accept either the applicant’s mere
conclusory allegations, unsupported by admissible evidence, or the
applicant’s conclusions of law. Roman v. State, 125 Idaho 644, 647, 873 P.2d 898,
901 (Ct. App. 1994); Baruth v. Gardner, 110 Idaho 156, 159, 715 P.2d 369, 372
(Ct. App. 1986).

On review of a dismissal of a post-conviction relief application without
an evidentiary hearing, we determine whether a genuine issue of fact exists
based on the pleadings, depositions, and admissions together with any
affidavits on file. Ricca v. State, 124 Idaho 894, 896, 865 P.2d 985, 987 (Ct.
App. 1993). In post-conviction actions, the district court, as the trier of
fact, is not constrained to draw inferences in favor of the party opposing
the motion for summary disposition; rather the district court is free to
arrive at the most probable inferences to be drawn from uncontroverted
evidence. Hayes v. State, 146 Idaho 353, 355, 195 P.3d 712, 714 (Ct. App. 2008).
It is also the rule that a conclusory allegation, unsubstantiated by any
fact, is insufficient to entitle a petitioner to an evidentiary hearing. Smith
v. State, 94 Idaho 469, 473, 491 P.2d 733, 737 (1971) (overruled on other
grounds); Nguyen, 126 Idaho at 497, 887 P.2d at 42; King v. State, 114
Idaho 442, 446, 757 P.2d 705, 709 (Ct. App. 1988); Drapeau v. State, 103 Idaho
612, 615, 651 P.2d 546, 549 (Ct. App. 1982). Idaho Code § 19-4903 states
that “[a]ffidavits, records, or other evidence supporting its allegations sha
ll be attached to the application or the application shall recite why they
are not attached.”

Here, a review of Briggs’s successive petition reveals that he did not
present sufficient evidence of any facts beyond what was asserted by his
initial post-conviction counsel in regard to his allegations of ineffective
assistance of trial counsel. His successive petition and affidavit in support
merely state (in various ways) his contention that post-conviction counsel
failed to show prejudice in regard to his ineffective assistance of trial
counsel claims. He failed to cite to authority for his proposition that he
should be allowed to file a successive petition due to his post-conviction
counsel’s inadequacy. In his response to the state’s motion for summary
dimissal,[ 2 ] Briggs attached several pages of the “Petitioner’s Response and
Opposition to Motion for Summary Dismissal” filed by his initial
post-conviction counsel in response to the state’s motion for summary dismissal of his
initial post-conviction petition. Presumably as his argument to avoid
summary dismissal of his successive petition, Briggs made handwritten notations
on the excerpted pages, emphasizing and attempting to elucidate some
points. Finally, in his response he stated:
For the foregoing reasons [presumably in reference to the excerpted
response], and for the potential, in all likelihood, for discovering more
evidence in his favor by way of testimony from expert witnesses regarding the
effects of the Zoloft withdrawal, more witnesses regarding Mr. Briggs’ bizarre
behavior the week of 10/21-10/28 2001 [sic] (including Dori Lott, TSI
employees, Camilla Vanderlinden, Bowlero employees, Garcias [sic] personnel,
Jackson’s employees and video, Deralee Beck, Jared, Mays, Ameritel Inn clerk,
Texas Rhodehouse [sic] bartender, the dentist, and others), the list of
evidence found in petitioner’s car, new evidence showing a history of
depression dating back to at least 1999 with accompanying medical records, hearsay
of Deana Higgins/B. Park, new PSI evidence re: Toni Castaneda, and overall
what the investigation would have revealed in mitigating evidence to impact
the sentencing, if not to have made a trial initially possible­that
this matter proceed to evidentiary hearing [sic].

Assessing the entirety of Briggs’s successive application and supporting
affidavit, and taking into account his response to the state’s motion to
dismiss, he has failed to allege facts, which, if true would entitle him to
relief.[ 3 ] Initially, we note that his successive petition and accompanying
affidavit merely included statements of the issues without including any
facts allowing the district court to conclude (1) that there was sufficient
reason why his claims had been inadequately pursued initially, and (2) that
there was a basis for post-conviction relief. And, as we noted above, bare
or conclusory allegations, unsubstantiated by any fact, are inadequate to
entitle an applicant to an evidentiary hearing. Nguyen, 126 Idaho at 497,
887 P.2d at 42; King, 114 Idaho 442, 757 P.2d 705. See also I.C. § 19-4903
(noting that an application for post-conviction relief must be verified with
respect to facts within the personal knowledge of the applicant, and
affidavits, records or other evidence supporting its allegations must be
attached, or the application must state why such supporting evidence is not
included with the application).

In addition, Briggs’s response to the state’s summary dismissal motion
failed to assert the necessary bases for the district court to find in
Briggs’s favor on the two issues above. In fact, reasserting what was advanced by
his initial post-conviction counsel belies his claim that there was
sufficient reason­namely his post-conviction counsel’s inadequate
performance­that he did not raise the claims he now asserts in a successive
petition. In addition, simply asserting the possibility of mitigating evidence
being discovered, and listing potential witnesses, is not sufficient to
entitle him to an evidentiary hearing­such assertions are bare and conclusory
and included no affidavits or other evidence showing the actual existence
of mitigating evidence that could have been discovered and presented by
Briggs’s defense counsel. In short, Briggs has presented nothing but
speculation. See Drapeau, 103 Idaho at 617, 651 P.2d at 551 (noting that allegations
asserted in a petition for post-conviction relief, without supporting
affidavits based upon otherwise verifiable information, cannot be a basis for
post-conviction relief). See also Hooper, 127 Idaho 945, 908 P.2d 1252
(holding that in his successive post-conviction petition, petitioner failed to
assert any basis on which the district court could conclude that there was
sufficient reason why the grounds for relief asserted in his second petition
had not been raised­ or were inadequately raised­in his initial
petition); Nguyen, 126 Idaho at 497, 887 P.2d at 42 (affirming summary
dismissal of a successive application where it contained only allegations,
without supporting affidavits based on otherwise verifiable information, and thus
contained no evidence regarding the merits of his underlying claims or
that his counsel was ineffective for failing to raise the issues in the first
post-conviction proceeding); King, 114 Idaho 442, 757 P.2d 705 (affirming
summary dismissal of successive petition where there were no affidavits,
records or other evidence offered in support of the petition other than an
affidavit by King outlining the factual circumstances of the underlying crime
and his dissatisfaction because of the lesser penalties meted out to
co-defendants on the charge, as well as because of King’s failure to provide a
sufficient reason why the grounds alleged in the successive application were
not raised in the first application). Compare Stuart v. State, 127 Idaho
806, 907 P.2d 783 (1995) (holding that successive petition set forth facts,
with accompanying affidavits, alleging newly discovered information not known
to the applicant at the time of the filing of his first petition).[ 4 ]

In sum, because Briggs did not present evidence of facts showing that
there was sufficient reason his claims were inadequately presented in his first
post-conviction petition or that there were substantive grounds for relief
in regard to his claims of ineffective assistance of trial counsel, we
affirm the district court’s summary dismissal of Briggs’s successive petition
for post-conviction relief.

Chief Judge LANSING and Judge MELANSON CONCUR.
1. To prevail on an ineffective assistance of counsel claim, the defendant
must show that the attorney’s performance was deficient and that the
defendant was prejudiced by the deficiency. Strickland v. Washington, 466 U.S.
668, 687-88 (1984); Hassett v. State, 127 Idaho 313, 316, 900 P.2d 221, 224
(Ct. App. 1995). Where, as here, the defendant was convicted upon a guilty
plea, to satisfy the prejudice element, the claimant must show that there is
a reasonable probability that, but for counsel’s errors, he or she would
not have pled guilty and would have insisted on going to trial. Plant v.
State, 143 Idaho 758, 762, 152 P.3d 629, 633 (Ct. App. 2006).
2. This response was filed pro se, because, Briggs claims in the document,
he presumed that he was without counsel due to a potential conflict of
interest resulting in the “voluntary dismissal” of both attorneys appointed to
represent Briggs in regard to his successive petition. Subsequent to the
filing of this response, Briggs apparently moved to dismiss his
court-appointed counsel, a motion the district court denied. While counsel then
proceeded to represent Briggs at the summary dismissal hearing on his successive
petition, there is nothing in the record indicating that counsel filed any
substantive documents on Briggs’s behalf in regard to his successive
petition.
3. In his brief to this Court, Briggs alleges additional facts and
possible prejudice that he contends stemmed from his trial counsel’s ineffective
assistance of counsel. However, on appeal we review whether the successive
petition, as filed with the district court, was sufficient to survive summary
dismissal. Thus, contentions contained only in Briggs’s appellate brief
are irrelevant to our inquiry.
4. We also note, as the district court in this case pointed out, the mere
fact that the district court which adjudicated Briggs’s first petition
found there was no prejudice shown does not conclusively establish that
counsel’s performance was defective such that Briggs should have the opportunity
to file a successive petition. Just as likely, as the first district court
concluded, is that Briggs had not established prejudice not because
post-conviction counsel was ineffective, but because there were, in fact, no facts
establishing prejudice stemming from trial counsel’s alleged defective
representation.

1,629 total views, 1 views today

ANTIDEPRESSANT: City Councilman Candidate’s Wife Attacked Him: Texas

Paragraphs three through five read:  “She told of being
diagnosed with cancer shortly after their marriage in 1997, of suffering
depression after the treatment and of
medication
that magnified her issues.

“I have a
mean-spirited side and I took it out on him,” she told the gathering of about
100. “All those months of treatment and I was fed up. And
he was the one I could beat the hell out of.”

“But when the husband
made it a two-way fight before turning to leave the home, she said, she called
police. She ditched the prescription medication and they have long
since gotten through their issues
, she said, adding that David McNeely
is today a candidate worthy of the voters’ faith.

http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/news/politics/local/stories/042810dnmetgarcouncil.2e165f3.html

Garland council candidate’s wife defends him despite domestic violence
charge

03:11 PM CDT on Tuesday, April 27, 2010
By RAY LESZCYNSKI / The Dallas Morning News
rleszcynski@dallasnews.com

A wife‘s story of ovarian cancer and domestic
violence added yet another layer of passion to Garland’s lone contested city

council race Monday night.

Sharp questions, finger-pointing between
incumbent John Willis and challenger David McNeely and a moderator calling for
order had already made for a lively forum. Then, as parties were dismissed,
Donna McNeely stepped to the podium at Shiloh Worship Center.

She told
of being diagnosed with cancer shortly after their marriage in 1997, of
suffering depression after the treatment and of medication that magnified her
issues.

“I have a mean-spirited side and I took it out on him,” she told
the gathering of about 100. “All those months of treatment and I was fed up. And
he was the one I could beat the hell out of.”

But when the husband made
it a two-way fight before turning to leave the home, she said, she called
police. She ditched the prescription medication and they have long since gotten
through their issues, she said, adding that David McNeely is today a candidate
worthy of the voters’ faith.

During the forum, the candidate had ducked
questions about the 1999 assault charge that was dismissed after he served a
year’s probation, restating that it was long ago and not relevant. He said later
that the decision to make a public statement was Donna’s.

1,490 total views, no views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS & ALCOHOL: Death: Ireland

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):

Death by misadventure!” What is that? “Death by medicine” is
far more accurate! When antidepressants CAUSE overwhelming cravings for alcohol

or Dipsomania (an uncontrollable urge to drink alcohol) why was this case not
determined to be murder by medicine? That is what it was. When the drug causes
you to mix a deadly combo that takes your life then it is murder by medicine in
my book!

______________________________________
First three paragraphs read:  “AN A&E consultant has
warned of the “lethal” consequences of combining alcohol and prescription
medication
following the death of Bertie Ahern’s
nephew from a mixture of drink and anti-depressants.”

“Dr Chris
Luke said people were admitted every day suffering from the effects of legal
drug and alcohol cocktails. Dr Luke, a consultant at Cork University Hospital,
said legal drugs were as dangerous as illegal drugs
and the public needed to be made aware of the dangers”.

“He was
commenting after an inquest found that Dylan Ahern, the son of former Dublin
City Councillor Maurice Ahern, had been killed by a combination of
anti-depressant medication and alcohol.
A jury returned a verdict of

death by misadventure.”

http://www.herald.ie/national-news/booze-and-pills-alert-after-bertie-tragedy-2139007.html

Booze and pills alert after Bertie tragedy

Thursday April 15 2010

AN A&E consultant has warned
of the “lethal” consequences of combining alcohol and prescription medication
following the death of Bertie Ahern’s nephew from a mixture of drink and
anti-depressants.

Dr Chris Luke said people were admitted every day
suffering from the effects of legal drug and alcohol cocktails. Dr Luke, a
consultant at Cork University Hospital, said legal drugs were as dangerous as
illegal drugs and the public needed to be made aware of the dangers.

He
was commenting after an inquest found that Dylan Ahern, the son of former Dublin
City Councillor Maurice Ahern, had been killed by a combination of
anti-depressant medication and alcohol. A jury returned a verdict of death by
misadventure.

Toxic

“Every week on our observation ward at CUH, we
have several cases of people who have poisoned themselves with booze and
whatever was in the medicine cabinet,” Dr Luke said.

“When giving talks
to parents, teenagers and colleagues, I always start by saying the first drug is

alcohol and it’s always the first chapter in any story of substance abuse.

“Nine out of 10 times when people poison themselves, it involves
alcohol. We would rarely get a case of an overdose of anti-depressants or other
drugs without alcohol being consumed first.

Alcohol also sensitises
parts of the body like the heart, brain and stomach lining, making them more
susceptible to being affected by other drugs.

“It amplifies the toxic
effect of each compound so the synergy they have is greater than the sum of
their parts in their effect on the body.”

Dr Luke said the effect could
be either a more intense tranquilising effect, or a paradoxical stimulation,
leaving people either almost comatose, or “off their heads”.

He said a
large number of people who self-harmed with alcohol and drugs did so either
accidentally or impulsively.

They can become aggressive, violent and
paranoid and can suffer from a rapid heart rate, high blood pressure or
“electrical chaos” in the brain, leading to seizures or even heart attacks and
fatal strokes. “Booze and drugs are always a dangerous combination,” he
added.

hnews@herald.ie

– Andrew
Phelan

1,742 total views, 1 views today

ANTIDEPRESSANT DUI: Vehicular Homicide: Woman Gets 6 Years in Prison: W Va

Paragraph six reads:  “Brown was taking
prescription medication for depression
and panic attacks
the morning of the crash. But during that plea hearing She admitted publicly she
was taking much more than what was
prescribed.

http://www.wsaz.com/news/headlines/50136157.html?ref=157

NEW INFO: Erma Brown Sentenced In DUI Crash that Killed Mother, Two St.
Joe Students
Erma Brown sentenced to three consecutive 2-10 year prison

terms.


Posted: 11:31 AM Apr 12, 2010
Reporter: Carrie
Cline
Email Address:
carrie.cline@wsaz.com


mip://058efea0/default.html??.htm UPDATE 4/12 11:30 am

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. (WSAZ) — The woman who pleaded
guilty to causing a fiery crash that killed a mother and two high school
students will spend a minimum six years behind bars.

In February, Erma
Brown pleaded guilty to three counts of DUI causing death.

The 2-vehicle
accident happened at about 7:30 a.m. on April 2, 2009 on Alternate Route 10 near
the intersection of Eden’s Branch Road in Barboursville.

Investigators
say Brown crossed the center line and hit the car driven by 47-year-old Carole
Crawford. Crawford, her daughter Meaghan, 16, and Kelsey Kuhn, 15, died in the
crash after their car caught fire.

During Monday’s hearing in Cabell
County Circuit Court, Judge Dan O’Hanlon sentenced Brown to three consecutive
2-10 year prison terms. That is the maximum sentenced allowed for her
plea.

Brown was taking prescription medication for depression and panic
attacks the morning of the crash. But during that plea hearing She admitted
publicly she was taking much more than what was prescribed.

Before
handing down the sentence, the court heard from both families.

Keep
clicking on WSAZ.com for updated
information

2,127 total views, 1 views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Two Brothers Commit Suicide One Week Apart: Arkansas

Paragraphs eight and nine read:  ”  ‘One guy last
year locked himself inside a bathroom and shot himself, and this was a
retired military man that was highly decorated
, Bearden said. “Then
come to find out, his brother had done the same thing the week before in
another state.”

“The correlation between the two brothers was

anti-depression medications, Bearden said. While he can’t confirm
that the prescription medication was what led to the brothers’ suicides, Bearden
said it happens too often that prescription drugs change
the mindset of a person.”

Paragraph four reads:  “Bearden
added,  ‘People need to know that we do, in fact, have a problem in Saline
County. We don’t really have many ‘hard’ drugs here anymore. Every once in
awhile you’ll see cocaine or marijuana or other street drugs, but most of the deaths … 90 percent come from prescription
drugs’.”

http://www.bentoncourier.com/content/view/204346/1/

Coroner: Teen Drug Death Rate High

Saturday, 06
February 2010

The hand reaches down as another parent
enters the room fearing the worst. The large black bag slowly unzips and the
worst fear a parent never wants to believe, that moment is here. Inside the
darkness of the body bag lies someone’s son, daughter, nephew, their niece ­
someone’s good friend, and another family is torn apart with grief, confusion,
and a wish it was them instead.

It is a day that
Will Bearden has seen too often in his 13 years as the Saline County Corner, and
18 years previously riding on an ambulance as an EMT. Nearly everyday Bearden
has to tell yet another family what caused the death of a loved one, and
surprising to many, he said nearly 90 percent are due to drugs and
alcohol.


In fact, in 2009 alone, Bearden said that about 60 deaths were related
to drugs and alcohol, and nearly 30 of those deaths involved teenagers living in
Saline County, and state officials say the county leads the state in the number
of fatal drug overdoses.

“When you say it won’t happen to me or my family,
you are about to eat your words, because I have seen it happen time and time
again,” Bearden said. “I work in it every day, and I see a lot of sad families
asking what they could have done to help their son or daughter.”
Bearden added, “People need to know that we do, in fact,
have a problem in Saline County. We don’t really have many ‘hard’ drugs here
anymore. Every once in awhile you’ll see cocaine or marijuana or other street
drugs, but most of the deaths … 90 percent come from prescription
drugs.”
Bearden said even Arkansas Chief Medical Examiner
Charles Kokes believes “Saline County has one of the highest percentages of
deaths caused by drug overdoses.”
But it isn’t just teens that are dying from prescription
drugs or alcohol; everyone is at risk, he said. From fatality accidents to
accidental overdoses to suicides, people “age 85 and down” have deaths related
to the rise in prescription drug abuse.
One guy last year locked himself inside a bathroom and
shot himself, and this was a retired military man that was highly decorated,”
Bearden said. “Then come to find out, his brother had done the same thing the
week before in another state.”
The correlation between the two brothers was
anti-depression medications, Bearden said. While he can’t confirm that the
prescription medication was what led to the brothers’ suicides, Bearden said it
happens too often that prescription drugs change the mindset of a
person.
“Drugs definitely affect a person’s mental state,” he
said. “I also believe that it’s a mental disease when someone gets hooked on
drugs. Many people addicted believe they have pain (whether physical, mental or
emotional) and they take medications for their pain. Some aren’t trying to do
harm; they just take too much and then some just go and take their lives, and
probably wouldn’t have if they wouldn’t have had so much medication affecting
their mental state.”
Bearden said of the nearly 60 deaths in Saline County
last year, around 22 were ruled suicides. After the bodies are sent to the
Arkansas State Crime Lab for toxicology screens, most come back with some type
of drugs in their system, the majority being prescription drugs.
“I’ve had to help out with a lot of those autopsies
because the medical examiner is overloaded with cases all the time, and I’ve
seen where pills aren’t even digested in the stomach yet and sometimes are still
in a person’s mouth,” Beard said. “What makes this job tough is when you have to
approach the loved ones of those that died. I’ve seen a lot of divorces and
hatred with families after a son or daughter’s death because the parents keep
blaming each other … it’s just a real sad thing to see, and I see it too
often.”
Bearden also recalls many trips to the Saline Memorial
Hospital in which a person survived an overdose. But it isn’t in any way
pleasant for anyone, he said.
“Three or four times a night I bet someone overdoses on
drugs, but survives from having their stomachs pumped and they fight with the
doctors and nurses,” Bearden said. “It’s got to be a unbelievable pain to have a
stomach pumped, but they shouldn’t have put themselves in that situation if they
didn’t want that to happen and the medical staff has to do whatever they can to
save their life.”
Then there is the criminal side of people hooked on
drugs. Once, Bearden said he left the home of an older person that had just
died  and later returned to the home to retrieve medications to help with
the death investigation.
“It wasn’t even 30 minutes later that I returned to the
home,” he said. “I found the back door kicked in and inside were two teenagers
going through the medicine cabinets. They were ambulance-listening and chasing
in hopes of finding prescription drugs.”
Bearden said police and others are now even warning
families to not list the addresses of the deceased. He said the prescription
drug abusers do everything from listen to police/fire/ambulance scanners, to
chasing ambulances to even reading obituaries in newspapers.
“It has unfortunately come to that point,” Bearden said.
“Don’t tell people where the family is because they’ll break in and look for
whatever (prescription) drugs they can find.”
However, Bearden believes this can be overcome. He said
people first need to listen and believe there is a problem and then work
together to find solutions.
“We’ve got to get the message to the younger kids and we
can do that by getting the parents and grandparents involved in teaching them
and making them realize that it can happen to them,” Bearden said. “I think we
need more programs in school to recognize and talk about this problem. And the
younger the children we can reach, the better we can be in helping it all end.
But really the best way is by word of mouth.”

One program Bearden said he is
“100 percent behind” is the Operation Medicine Cabinet. (See related
article.)

Most importantly, Bearden said people have to truly
believe there is a problem with prescription drug abuse in Saline County.

Unzipping another body bag and
having to tell parents that their child is gone is a part of the job Bearden
wishes he never has to do again, but it happens ­ much too often.

“ … It will send chills up
your spine,” he said. “ … Letting parents in to identify the body … that’s
real stuff, and I want to change that. If we can all work together, we can end
it.”

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ANTIDEPRESSANT WITHDRAWAL: Mother Kills Baby: Pennsylvania

Paragraph 16 reads:  “The defendant’s defense lawyer,
Pietro Joseph D’Angelo, told the court that at the time of the baby’s death,
Brown should have been taking medication for depression and
anxiety.”

“Brown, who is currently back
on prescription medication,
testified she is better able to
cope.”

http://www.timesherald.com/articles/2009/11/21/news/doc4b0772fcf0acd165303912.txt

By KEITH PHUCAS
Times Herald Staff

COURTHOUSE
­ A Norristown woman who admitted causing fatal injuries to her 20-month-old
toddler last November, when she shook him and banged his head against a bed
headboard, was sentenced to prison Friday.

Jennifer Brown, 24, who
pleaded guilty in September to involuntary manslaughter and endangering the
welfare of a child, was sentenced by Montgomery County Judge William R.
Carpenter to 11 1/2 to 23 months behind bars and three years’
probation.

Brown has already been incarcerated for seven months and is
eligible for Montgomery County Correctional Facility’s Work Release
Program.

She severely injured her son, Lathario Brown-Jacobs, on Nov. 25
in his bedroom at the family’s East Jacoby Street home, and the child died in
the hospital three days later.

After paramedics attempted to treat the
child at the scene, he was taken to Montgomery Hospital. Physicians there
suspected the severe trauma was not accidentally inflicted, and the child was
transferred to Children’s Hospital in Philadelphia, where he was put on life
support.

When the injured boy was initially hospitalized, the woman
claimed she was awakened by sounds coming from her son’s room at 3 a.m.,
according to court papers, and when she went to check on him, he was having
difficulty breathing.

The mother claimed she tried to wake him, but he
reportedly didn’t respond, and she got upset and began shaking him and hit his
head several times, according to authorities. Around 4 a.m., the mother called
911 to report her son was having breathing problems.

A Norristown day
care center that took care of Lathario Brown on a regular basis told
investigators that the boy frequently had a bloody nose or bloody lip when he
was dropped off in the morning, according to court papers.

When
Norristown Detective David Mazza and County Detective Rich Nilsen interviewed
Brown a second time, she admitted shaking the boy and hitting his head several
times on the headboard or the wall, and at some point the toddler “went
limp.”

According to court records, Dr. Chase Blanchard, a forensic
pathologist with the Philadelphia Medical Examiner’s Office, performed an
autopsy. Dr. Lucy Rorke-Adams, an expert in neuropathology, examined the child’s
brain tissue, and concluded he died as a result of a severe brain
injury.

The defendant’s mother, Eleanor Brown, and the child’s father,
Terrence Jacobs, testified at the sentencing hearing.

“My daughter has
been through a lot of pain and suffering,” Eleanor Brown said. “This has made
her stronger.”

Jacobs, who is also the father of the 24-year-old woman’s
other children, described her as a “very passionate” person. He said the couple
had lived together in Augusta, Ga., but the couple split up and Brown returned
to Norristown.

“She was the thread that held our family together,” he
said.

The defendant’s defense lawyer, Pietro Joseph D’Angelo, told the
court that at the time of the baby’s death, Brown should have been taking
medication for depression and anxiety.

Brown, who is currently back on
prescription medication, testified she is better able to cope.

“It makes
me feel real calm,” she said.

Brown, who graduated from Norristown Area
High School in 2003, played on the school’s field hockey and lacrosse
teams.

Just prior to sentencing, Carpenter said the defendant had no
prior criminal record and was actively participating in counseling programs in
prison.

“I find she is genuinely remorseful, and has the support from her
family,” the judge said.

Since the child’s death nearly a year ago,
Brown’s brother and father have also died.

“She has suffered, and we all
have suffered,” Eleanor Brown said.

1,972 total views, no views today

CELEXA: Suicide Attempt: Arizona

Sentences two and three read:  “According to police, she
was semi-alert and slurring her speech. She informed police that she had
taken fifteen 20mg Celexa pills approximately two hours
before
calling police.”

http://wildcat.arizona.edu/police-beat/police-beat-oct-22-1.796330 #

Woman tries to overdose on
depression medication

UAPD officers were dispatched to the La
Aldea apartment complex at 825 E. Fifth St. on Oct. 11 at 1:56 p.m. in reference
to a resident who had attempted to overdose on prescription medication. Upon
arrival, officers made contact with the resident. According to police, she was
semi-alert and slurring her speech. She informed police that she had taken
fifteen 20mg Celexa pills approximately two hours before calling police. She
admitted that she did not want to die and had taken the pills because she was
upset that her therapist had terminated her sessions, believing she was unable
to further assist the woman. Tucson Fire Department emergency medical personnel
arrived on scene and transported the woman to University Medical Center for
treatment. While at UMC, mental health professionals signed an emergency
petition to commit the woman until additional mental health evaluations could be
performed

1,196 total views, no views today

ZOLOFT & ADDERALL: Linsay Lohan’s Family Plans Intervention: California

Paragraph six reads: “Among the pills she apparently takes are Attention Deficit Disorder medication Adderall, anti-depressant Zoloft and pills to treat anxiety and bi-polar disorder.”

http://tvnz.co.nz/entertainment-news/lindsay-lohan-s-family-plan-intervention-3065386

Lindsay Lohan’s family plan intervention
Published: 12:54AM Saturday October 10, 2009

Source: BANG Showbiz

ReutersLindsay Lohan

Lindsay Lohan’s family is planning to stage an intervention.

Lindsay’s father Michael Lohan – who claims she is addicted to prescription medication – revealed he and her mother Dina are concerned the star’s life is spiralling out of control and have discussed forcing their daughter to get professional help.

Michael said: “I had a conversation with her, her mother and everyone. Over the next couple of weeks I’m going to be doing things in a pretty public way.

“But Dina has got to get on the same page with me. It’s a serious situation. You can’t just talk about it and tell me that you want to do an intervention and then do nothing.”

It has been claimed Lindsay – who has completed three previous stints in rehab – is addicted to a cocktail of different prescription medications.

Among the pills she apparently takes are Attention Deficit Disorder medication Adderall, anti-depressant Zoloft and pills to treat anxiety and bi-polar disorder.

Michael says he has been forced to speak out publicly about his 23-year-old daughter’s substance problem as it is the only way to make her pay attention to him.
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He explained to website RadarOnline: “When Lindsay doesn’t adhere or listen to what I say about serious situations, I feel I have to speak publicly to put pressure on her. If she doesn’t take my advice and do what I say & the more pressure I put on her, the more likely she is to eventually do the right thing.”

Meanwhile, it has been claimed Lindsay is close to having a mental breakdown.

A source told gossip website X17online: “Lindsay is so close to going to rehab, but what she really needs is something way more than most rehabs can offer. This is way beyond just drugs and alcohol.”

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