ANTIDEPRESSANT WITHDRAWAL: NC man gets 27 years in mother’s beating death

YET ANOTHER INDICATION OF HOW HORRIFIC
ANTIDEPRESSANT WITHDRAWAL CAN BE. REACHING FOR ILLEGAL DRUGS OR ALCOHOL IN ORDER
TO LESSEN THE WITHDRAWAL EFFECTS WHEN YOU CANNOT GET YOUR ANTIDEPRESSANT IS A
COMMON REPORT.

His attorney says Heath had been drinking and smoking
crack the night of the killing. She also says her client had been waiting for an
appointment at a Veteran’s Affair clinic for a refill of his antidepressant
medication.

NC man gets 27 years in mother’s beating death

The Associated Press
Posted: Friday, Apr. 30, 2010

CHARLOTTE, N.C. A North Carolina man has been sentenced to nearly three
decades in prison in the beating death of his 83-year-old mother.

The Charlotte Observer reported that 56-year-old Jerry Heath was sentenced to
27 years in prison after pleading guilty Thursday to second-degree murder.

Authorities say Heath killed his mother over $35. Prosecutors say Jerry Heath
hit Annie Heath with a lamp in November after she refused to give him more
money.

The Charlotte man wept as his relatives told a judge they weren’t mad at
Heath.

His attorney says Heath had been drinking and smoking crack the night of the
killing. She also says her client had been waiting for an appointment at a
Veteran’s Affair clinic for a refill of his antidepressant medication.

Information from: The Charlotte Observer,
http://www.charlotteobserver.com

Read more: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2010/04/30/1407185/ncmangets27yearsin-mothers.html#ixzz0mbP8tmbC

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show details Apr 30 (6 days ago)
NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):
Welcome to abrupt antidepressant withdrawal!!!! Few things are more
dangerous! I have warned of this for 18 years now and in 2005 the FDA warned
that ANY abrupt change in dose of an antidepressant can produce suicide,
hostility and/or psychosis as a result. How tragic that the Heath family has
learned how true that is by first hand experience. To safely withdraw patients
MUST go extremely slowly down off these drugs.
And the fact remains that if Jerry Heath had substance abuse problems
before his use of an antidepressant he should NEVER have been prescribed one and
if he had no substance abuse problems before the prescription, those cravings
were induced by the use of the antidepressant. I AM SO SICK OF SEEING PEOPLE
WITH THESE PROBLEMS BEING GIVEN THESE DEADLY DRUGS WE CALL “ANTIDEPRESSANTS” AND
THE VA ARE AMONG THE VERY WORST AT HANDING THEM OUT LIKE CANDY!

NC man gets 27 years in mother’s beating death

The Associated Press
Posted: Friday, Apr. 30, 2010

CHARLOTTE, N.C. A North Carolina man has been sentenced to nearly three
decades in prison in the beating death of his 83-year-old mother.

The Charlotte Observer reported that 56-year-old Jerry Heath was sentenced to
27 years in prison after pleading guilty Thursday to second-degree murder.

Authorities say Heath killed his mother over $35. Prosecutors say Jerry Heath
hit Annie Heath with a lamp in November after she refused to give him more
money.

The Charlotte man wept as his relatives told a judge they weren’t mad at
Heath.

His attorney says Heath had been drinking and smoking crack the night of the
killing. She also says her client had been waiting for an appointment at a
Veteran’s Affair clinic for a refill of his antidepressant medication.

Information from: The Charlotte Observer,
http://www.charlotteobserver.com

Read more: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2010/04/30/1407185/ncmangets27yearsin-mothers.html#ixzz0mbmg96tK

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Court overturns conviction in 2005 child neglect case

When Schieck discussed the plea agreement, the court said he was aware that
Snyder “had a significant history of mental health problems, including a
previous institutionalization, antidepressant prescriptions and recent suicide
attempts.”

  • Saturday, January 30, 2010
  • 54° | Mostly Cloudy

    Court overturns conviction in 2005 child

    neglect case

    By Cy Ryan

    Fri, Jan 15, 2010 (3:40 p.m.)

    CARSON CITY – In a 2-1 decision, the Nevada Supreme Court has voided the
    second-degree murder conviction of Charlene Snyder in a highly publicized child

    neglect case in Las Vegas.

    The court said trial lawyer David Schieck failed to request a psychiatric
    evaluation prior to advising her to plead guilty.

    Snyder’s 2-year-old daughter, Adacelli, had cerebral palsy and weighed only
    11 pounds at the time of her death in the summer of 2005. She was found dead
    inside the family’s mobile home in a room filled with animal and human feces and
    rotting food.

    When Schieck discussed the plea agreement, the court said he was aware that
    Snyder “had a significant history of mental health problems, including a
    previous institutionalization, antidepressant prescriptions and recent suicide
    attempts.”

    The court said the lawyer was aware “of the highly unusual behavior she
    exhibited in allowing her home to, in effect, become a cesspool.

    In light of trial counsel’s knowledge, he was unreasonable in failing to
    request a psychiatric evaluation prior to counseling appellant (Snyder) to plead
    guilty.”

    Schieck had testified he did not order the evaluation because he believed
    Snyder was competent. The court said, “the standard for competency is not the
    same as that for insanity, nor is it relevant to appellant’s state of mind when
    her daughter died.”

    The court said a psychiatric evaluation may have supported the only line of
    defense for Snyder of “insanity or that she lacked the requisite state of
    mind.”

    The majority decision was signed Justices Michael Cherry and Michael Douglas.
    Dissenting was Justice Mark Gibbons, who said Snyder had not met her burden to
    show her lawyer was incompetent.

    Snyder, now 32, will return to district court in Las Vegas for new
    proceedings.

    Both Snyder and her boyfriend Jack Richardson, now 29, were sentenced to
    terms of 10 years to life on the second-degree murder conviction.

    Discussion: 2 comments so far…

    1. By LasVegasLawyerGal
      1/15/10 at 4:57 p.m.

      Of course, the part not mentioned by the article is that in practice,
      requesting a psych eval for one’s client means a transfer of the matter to
      Judge Glass–who rarely, if ever, finds anyone incompetent. This is not to
      dispute that attorneys should request psych evals when it appears to them that
      mental competency is in issue–but it is a bit rich for our Supreme Court to
      posit that a psych eval would have magically changed the outcome.

    2. By Launce
      1/16/10 at 4:19 p.m.

      LVLG is correct, but nonetheless, the Court shows some intestinal fortitude
      in sending this back to District Court. The mob’s hunger for blood
      notwithstanding, this is a clear example of someone who could not, should not
      be responsible for the care of a disabled infant. The mob wants to punish
      Snyder for the community’s failure to look out for the most
      vulnerable.

  • 1,203 total views, no views today

    ANTIDEPRESSANT: 14 Year Old Girl Kills 3 Year Old: Canada

    Paragraph 15 reads:  “But fetal alcohol syndrome,
    attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, disruptive, hostile and threatening
    behaviour ­ behaviour that escalated before her period and required
    anti-depressant and anti-anxiety medication to quell ­
    and functioning at the level of a child half the girl‘s age didn’t faze
    Hamilton.”

    http://www.stcatharinesstandard.ca/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=2367695

    Inquest opens into boy’s killing

    Posted By TIFFANY MAYER Standard Staff

    The three-yearold boy signed the word across the dinner table to the daughter of
    his Welland foster mom.

    He did it to show he understood the young
    woman’s message to him ­ also said with sign language to quiet the talkative
    tot ­ that the 14yearold girl joining them at the table, who arrived that
    mid-December day in 2005 to stay with them, was a friend.

    The next
    morning, foster mom Margaret Hamilton found the gregarious boy lying on his
    bedroom floor, cold and grey.

    He had been smothered by his friend, a
    Crown ward in the care of Family and Children’s Services Niagara, who confessed
    her crime in a note left near the boy’s body and calmly brushed her freshly
    washed hair in her bedroom as Hamilton and her daughter frantically called for
    help.

    The girl, who cannot be identified, was given a seven-year

    sentence in November 2007 for second-degree murder.

    On Monday, during
    the first day of a coroner’s inquest that will examine the events surrounding
    the tragedy, Hamilton relived the events leading to the Dec. 15, 2005 death of
    the boy, who was in the care of the Haldimand-Norfolk Children’s Aid Society.

    Due to a publication ban, the boy can’t be named.

    The inquest,
    presided over by Dr. James Edwards, is being held at the Quality Hotel Parkway
    Convention Centre on Ontario Street. It is expected to take three weeks.

    A five-person jury will hear from about 30 witnesses, including police,
    a forensic pathologist, social workers, educators who worked with the girl,
    foster families and, possibly, the perpetrator herself.

    At the end of
    the proceedings, the jury can choose to make recommendations that can be used to
    prevent similar deaths in the future.

    The circumstances surrounding the death “cry out for some kind of
    examination,” coroner counsel Eric Siebenmorgen said.

    As she answered
    Siebenmorgen’s questions, Hamilton talked about the notes she took when she got
    the call that FACS Niagara would like to make use of a bed in her Welland home.
    It was a bed that she decided to reserve for the agency after moving to Niagara
    from neighbouring Haldimand County a year earlier.

    She had been a foster
    parent with Haldimand-Norfolk CAS for more than four years when the 14yearold

    girl, who had recently been raped and was arrested for stealing a van, would be
    coming to stay with her.

    The list of issues plaguing the teen was long
    and troublesome to anyone unfamiliar with caring for foster children,
    Siebenmorgen noted.

    But fetal alcohol syndrome, attention deficit
    hyperactivity disorder, disruptive, hostile and threatening behaviour ­
    behaviour that escalated before her period and required anti-depressant and
    anti-anxiety medication to quell ­ and functioning at the level of a child
    half the girl‘s age didn’t faze Hamilton.

    “I fostered a lot of teenage
    girls, a lot of runners, and almost always seemed to have good rapport with
    them,” she said.

    What she did question, though, was how the girl was
    with young children, Hamilton told the inquest.

    The boy, who had
    recently been returned to Hamilton’s home after time with his biological mother,
    had been roughed up by an eight-yearold girl who had stayed briefly with
    Hamilton a couple weeks earlier.

    “I wanted him to get settled and feel
    comfortable,” Hamilton said. “I didn’t want anything upsetting him …. The
    response to that was, ‘No, she likes little kids.’ ”

    But looking back,
    as Siebenmorgen asked her to do, Hamilton said she felt the half-hour that the

    girl‘s caseworker spent at her home when dropping off the teen seemed short and
    rushed.

    That evening, as dinner was eaten, TV was watched and everyone
    called it a night, nothing seemed out of the ordinary, until she went to rouse
    the boy the next morning and get him ready for a pre-school Christmas party.

    In hindsight, Hamilton said she would have liked to have seen some of
    the notes in the girl‘s file with FACS, written between 2000 and 2003, before
    agreeing to accept her. The teen was the first foster child from FACS Niagara
    that Hamilton welcomed into her home.

    Two incidents in particular
    concerned Hamilton: a report of the girl allegedly putting another child’s head
    through a window and another accusation of her pushing a child down stairs.

    “I believe if I had those notes, I wouldn’t have chosen to have someone
    with that background in the home, just because there was a small child in my
    home,” Hamilton said.

    The inquest continues Tuesday with
    cross-examination by counsel for the boy’s biological family.
    Article ID#
    2367695

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    PROZAC: Soldier Stabs to death Two Fellow Soldiers: Iraq/New York

    Paragraphs 5 through 8 read:  “Investigators found the
    23-year old’s body and along with the body of 20-year old Waide James of Port
    St. John in Brevard County in their apartment just outside Ft. Drum in New York.
    The two failed to report for duty on base.

    Police say the Army Specialists had been stabbed to death.

    New York

    authorities tracked their other roommate, military police officer Joshua
    Hunter,
    to Ohio.

    “Hunter, 20, was expected to be arraigned on
    second-degree murder charges Friday morning, three days after the bodies
    of James and Valbuena were found in their apartment just outside Fort Drum,
    a
    bout 140 miles northwest of Albany. Hunter and the two victims served
    in Iraq at the same time in the same battalion.”

    Paragraph 11
    reads:  “‘He was a gunner and he was active,’  says his father, Jim
    Hunter.  ‘He said he saw some things he couldn’t get out of his mind. I
    know he was seeing a therapist and taking

    Prozac.”

    http://www.tcpalm.com/news/2009/dec/04/slain-port-st-lucie-soldier-recalled-loving-person/

    Slain Port St. Lucie soldier recalled as ‘loving person’ who put others
    first

    • BY CAROLYN SCOFIELD WPTV NewsChannel 5
    • Posted December 4, 2009 at 6:18 a.m.

    PORT ST. LUCIE ­ Nicole
    Aviles will always remember his smile.

    Diego Valbuena, a 2006 St. Lucie
    West Centennial graduate, had a big grin and knew how to make his younger cousin
    laugh.

    “He was like the life of the party,” says Nicole Aviles. “He
    always had a big grin on his face.”

    There’s not a lot of laughter in the
    family right now as they prepare for the funeral of the Port St. Lucie
    resident.

    Investigators found the 23-year old’s body and along with the
    body of 20-year old Waide James of Port St. John in Brevard County in their
    apartment just outside Ft. Drum in New York. The two failed to report for duty
    on base.

    Police say the Army Specialists had been stabbed to

    death.

    New York authorities tracked their other roommate, military police
    officer Joshua Hunter, to Ohio.

    Hunter, 20, was expected to be arraigned
    on second-degree murder charges Friday morning, three days after the bodies of
    James and Valbuena were found in their apartment just outside Fort Drum, about
    140 miles northwest of Albany. Hunter and the two victims served in Iraq at the
    same time in the same battalion.

    They all were based at the wind-swept
    Army post near the Canadian border, home of the much-deployed 10th Mountain
    Division, and shared an off-base apartment.

    Investigators have not
    released a motive, but Hunter’s family says he served 15 months in Iraq and came
    back scarred.

    Relatives of Hunter said Thursday that he told them he saw
    his best friend “blown to pieces” in Iraq and came back a changed man: abusive,
    violent, sleepless, edgy and plagued by flashbacks.

    “He was a gunner and
    he was active,” says his father, Jim Hunter. “He said he saw some things he
    couldn’t get out of his mind. I know he was seeing a therapist and taking

    Prozac.”

    Hunter’s wife, Emily Hunter, told The Associated Press in a
    phone interview that her husband was outgoing before he went to war, but when he
    returned stateside, he was an emotional wreck.

    “He’d just burst into
    tears; spouts of anger or sadness,” she said. “There’d be one emotion but it
    would be really deep, just extremely happy or extremely sad. His emotions were
    always on the rocks.”

    “He’d take his rage out on the wall, or throw
    something,” she said.

    While he wasn’t violent toward his buddies, he was
    toward her, she said, adding that she went to the hospital a couple of times for
    treatment of an injured arm and thumb.

    She said she moved out two weeks
    ago because of his violence and is pursuing a divorce.

    Valbuena also
    served 15 months in Iraq. His family says he loved his country and excelled in
    the Army.

    He earned the Army Commendation Medal, Army Achievement Medal
    and Iraq Campaign Medal among other awards.

    More important than the
    medals was his love of family.

    “A guy like him is like, one in a trillion
    basically,” says Aviles. “He was just such a loving person, like he always put
    others in front of himself.”

    Sergio Valbuena said his brother was a good
    man.

    “He’s a pretty good boy, a pretty good kid,” he said. “He was loved
    by everybody. He was a very good brother, a very good son.

    “He was always
    a problem-solver. He loved this country. That’s the reason he joined the
    military.”

    In September, James and Valbuena graduated from Fort Drum’s
    Warrior Leaders Course, which teaches skills required to lead, train, fight and
    accomplish the mission as noncommissioned officers. The two and Hunter all
    listed each other as friends on their MySpace pages.

    Valbuena wrote on
    his MySpace page that he was born in Bogota, Colombia, and had joined the
    military in August 2008.

    James and Valbuena served as motor transport
    operators with the Headquarters Battalion of the 10th Mountain Division,
    according to Fort Drum’s public affairs office.

    James arrived at Fort
    Drum in July 2007, while Valbuena joined in August 2007 and came to Fort Drum in
    January. Both have received awards and decorations including the Army
    Commendation Medal, Army Achievement Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Iraq

    Campaign Medal and overseas service ribbon.

    James’ grandparents, who live
    in Port St. John, described him as an avid outdoorsman who loved
    fishing.

    James lived in Brevard County for three years before joining the
    Army in March 2007. He arrived in Fort Drum in July of that year.

    “He
    returned from his first tour of Iraq about seven months ago,” said his
    grandfather, Chuck Mills. “If he could go fishing every hour of the day, he
    would. He loved four-wheeling, being out in the mud.”

    Valbuena’s family
    is making arrangements to hold his funeral in Port St. Lucie.

    Staff
    writer Eric Pfahler, Kaustuv Basu of Florida Today and The Associated Press
    contributed to this report.

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    10/13/1999 – Attempted Murder by Man on Zoloft

    This case out of Maryland is so tragic. The perpetrator took Zoloft
    and now has no memory of the incident. Even his mother said he
    “hallucinated” on the drug. The young couple were deeply in love and
    had a great relationship. This story, too, combines elements of “road
    rage” with the attempted murder.

    This is just one of many stories we continue to review, now almost
    daily, on how these drugs can cause psychotic breaks in some
    individuals and no memory of the violence later. Notice also, how sleep
    deprivation, a known side-effect of these drugs, contributed to this
    incident.

    Thanks to one of our ICFDA directors for passing this along.

    As a reminder to interested subscribers, if you see articles like
    these, please bring them to our attention by forwarding them to
    <mmiller1@…>.

    ———–
    Sep. 22, 1999, The Capital

    Police Say Man Tried to Kill Wife

    An Annapolis man with no history of prior violence was charged
    yesterday with trying to kill the wife he adored in a car crash near
    the State House earlier this month.

    In a mysterious case that still puzzles city police, Douglas Lund, 36,
    of 1 Colonial Ave., was ordered held without bond on a charge of
    attempted second-degree murder.

    He awaits a competency evaluation today in the county detention center,
    where he’s being held. Another bail review hearing will follow within
    the next few days, a spokesman for the State’s Attorney’s Office said.

    Police have found no motive for Mr. Lund’s actions on Sept. 7, when he
    crashed his car on Bladen Street and allegedly beat his wife, Amy Lund,
    32, an assistant state’s attorney for Dorchester County.

    “They were doing great,” said city police Detective Jim Bryant, who
    investigated the case with the State’s Attorney’s Office. “He never
    abused her in any way. This was one of those off-the-wall things.”

    But Mr. Lund’s mother, Jo Ann Lund, blames the drug Zoloft, which her
    son was taking for depression.

    “He took the drug and started hallucinating,” she said.

    Mr. Lund, a full-time student at Bowie State University, had been
    suffering sleeplessness for several weeks and had asked his wife to go
    for a drive.

    About 3 a.m., they were headed home when Mrs. Lund saw her husband run
    a red light and switch lanes on Rowe Boulevard, heading toward the
    State House, police said.

    Driving toward construction site barriers on Bladen Street, he
    allegedly unfastened his wife’s seat belt before intentionally crashing
    his 1990 Honda Accord into a metal fence, running over several “Road
    Closed” signs without hitting the brakes, police said.

    Mr. Lund forced his wife from the car, grabbed her neck and hair and
    beat her head against the pavement several times, police said.

    Grunting, but never speaking, he dragged her about 30 feet from the
    scene, Detective Bryant said. Then he slung her body over his shoulder
    and carried her across the grassy median between Bladen Street and Rowe
    Boulevard.

    Crossing Rowe Boulevard, he dumped her on the grass behind low-hanging
    tree branches and flagged down a passing vehicle.

    It took six hours of surgery to repair her shattered vertebrae,
    Detective Bryant said. She also suffered a broken collarbone and
    finger, abrasions and a black eye.

    She was released Sept. 15 from the Shock-Trauma Center at University
    Hospital in Baltimore and is no longer staying in the area, police
    said.

    According to Mr. Lund’s mother, the Lunds had a loving relationship,
    still holding hands after 11 years of dating and marriage.

    The message on their anniversary cards this summer was identical:
    “Thank you for the best six years of my life.”

    With no children, the Lunds, who lived in Annapolis sporadically for
    eight years, were apparently on a career track. Mr. Lund had just begun
    student teaching in his final semester of college.

    According to his mother, he never suffered mental problems, other than
    worrying too much. His family calls him “Mr. Applesauce” for his
    healthy lifestyle and eating habits, she said.

    But Mr. Lund is dyslexic and has Attention Deficit Disorder, and in the
    past few months his worries and stress over student teaching became
    overwhelming, she said.

    “He just panicked about going to the board, and the children being able
    to spell better than he did,” Mrs. Lund said.

    One morning he visited his mother in tears, and gave her his guns for
    fear that he might kill himself.

    After three weeks without sleeping and eating, Mr. Lund went to a
    doctor who prescribed Zoloft — a drug with warnings of fatal reactions
    and mental status changes. He was told to take it on a weekly basis.

    Mrs. Lund believes her son was overcome by hallucinations on the
    morning of the attack.

    Mr. Lund was committed to Sheppard Pratt Health System in Baltimore
    County following the offense after he told police he felt like hurting
    himself, Detective Bryant said.

    He told Detective Bryant he was “dazed” and has no memory of the
    incident.

    “All he remembers is driving down the road and carrying his wife to the
    hospital,” Detective Bryant said. “I thought it was strange that he was
    headed the wrong way.”

    Mr. Lund had no history of violence, and his wife’s main concern was
    that the arrest would tarnish his clean record, Detective Bryant said.

    Annapolis Attorney Gill Cochran, who is tentatively representing Mr.
    Lund, said he plans to seek detention for his client at a medical
    facility such as Sheppard Pratt. He will eventually enter a plea of
    “not criminally responsible,” he said.

    “Psychological difficulties are clearly involved in this case,” he
    said.
    Copyright © 1999 The Capital, Annapolis, Md.

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