ANTIDEPRESSANTS ARE FAR FROM ALONE IN DANGERS! & BEWARE OF DRUG ADVERTIZING!

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):
The following article on drug advertising, “Side Effects Include Denial” is an
EXCELLENT article on how the public is brainwashed into using drugs without a
thought. This is how we have ended up on all of these new “Designer Drugs” that
seem to be more the norm in our society now than the abnormal. When I was
growing up someone who was ill was out of the ordinary. Most we well. Now it
seems the exact opposite with even the very young discussing their serious
disorders – things we never saw in children before.

Although our site has focused on antidepressants for many
years, that focus has nothing to do with lack of concern over a myriad
of other deadly medications. The focus on antidepressants has been due to
the extremely widespread use of these drugs along with their potential to lead
the user to extreme out of character violence toward themselves or others
coupled with their potential to lead to many other drugs being prescribed for
the antidepressant side effects they suffer (new symptoms such as a
diagnosis for Psychosis or Bipolar Disorder, Panic or Anxiety attacks,
extreme insomnia, sleep apnea and other sleep disorders, Restless Leg Syndrome,
alcohol or nicotine use/abuse, diabetes, Fibromyalgia, thyroid problems,
headaches, IBS, MS, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, ADHD, etc., etc., etc.)
Many of the newer medications out there were designed specifically for the
increase in patients with these “symptoms” that are nothing more than
antidepressant side effects which would subside upon the safe withdrawal of the
individual from the offending medication – the antidepressant. And far too many

of these new drugs are just remakes of antidepressantsfar too similar in
action to these drugs. One example would be Chantix’ similarity to Zoloft.
Sarafem, prescribed for PMS, is nothing more than Prozac with a new name and
different color capsule (pink to give it a feminine touch). Duloxetine
is the chemical name for Lilly’s Cymbalta and the name generally given to a
patient prescribed the drug for urinary incontinence so that they
remain unaware that it is really an antidepressant (antidepressants have LONG
been given to children for bed wetting). Yet another antidepressant is
prescribed for tuberculosis. Then there are all of the headache medications and
too many pain killers which all have serotonergic effects and can cause many of

the same serious adverse reactions that antidepressants cause.

WE URGE YOU TO USE EXTEME CAUTION, NO MATTER THE DRUG PRESCRIBED!!!
PRESCRIPTION DRUGS ARE KILLING FAR MORE NATIONWIDE THAN ILLEGAL DRUGS!! READ
ANYTHING AND EVERYTHING BEFORE EVER PUTTING A DRUG IN YOUR MOUTH!!! INSIST ON A
PACKAGE INSERT RATHER THAN THE SHORT HANDOUT ON THE DRUG PROVIDED BY THE
PHARMACACY WHCIH DOES NOT EVEN SCRATCH THE SURFACE IN GIVING YOU THE TRUE
WARNINGS REFLECTED IN THE PACKAGE INSERTS.
__________________________________________
But last July the Food and Drug Administration, which approved Chantix in
2006, said it had received 4,762 reports of “serious psychiatric events” —
including paranoia, homicidal thoughts, hallucinations, 188 attempted suicides
and 98 suicides — and it ordered Pfizer to put a “black box” warning on the
drug.
Pfizer’s not worried for the same reason that Bristol-Myers Squibb isn’t
worried about its Abilify ad, with piano music under, showing a happy family’s
outing to a pier, accompanied by a voiceover about seizures, thoughts of
suicide, risk of death or stroke. It’s why Sanofi-aventis, the manufacturer of
Ambien, doesn’t mind spending half an ad (sleeping lady, rooster, harp) warning
of side-effects like sleep-driving and sleep-eating. And it’s why
GlaxoSmithKline is unconcerned about undercutting the effectiveness of its Requip ad

for Restless Leg Syndrome (relaxing lady, crossword puzzle, strings) with
warnings about (this is my favorite) compulsive gambling.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/marty-kaplan/side-effects-include-deni_b_463996.html

Marty Kaplan

Director, Norman Lear Center and Professor at the USC
Annenberg School
Posted: February 16, 2010 12:31 PM

Side
Effects Include Denial

Why would Pfizer spend $100 million on two-minute TV ads that use a minute of
that time admitting that their drug Chantix can cause “changes in behavior,
hostility, agitation, depressed mood,” “weird, unusual or strange dreams,” and
“suicidal thoughts or actions”?

Because they have to, and because it doesn’t matter.

With the patent on Pfizer’s cash cow Lipitor expiring next year, Chantix, a
smoking cessation pill, had been one of their big hopes for the future. Chantix
sales in 2007 approached $900 million; by 2009, it accounted for 90 percent of
smoking cessation prescriptions. But last July the Food and Drug Administration,
which approved Chantix in 2006, said it had received 4,762 reports of “serious
psychiatric events” — including paranoia, homicidal thoughts, hallucinations,
188 attempted suicides and 98 suicides — and it ordered Pfizer to put a “black
box” warning on the drug.

What to do? One tack Pfizer took was to launch a “help-seeking ad” that’s now running all over cable TV. You might easily mistake it
for a public service ad. As a voiceover reads sentences appearing on a black
screen, a match-flame turns the words to smoke: “You wanted to quit before you
got married… You wanted to quit before you turned thirty-five. You wanted to
quit when you had your first child.”

At the end, you’re invited to go to MyTimeToQuit.com, which takes you not to
the Surgeon-General or to the American Cancer Society, but to a Pfizer site that
in turn leads you to Chantix. There’s no legal requirement to include the
suicide warning on the faux-PSA, because it never mentions Chantix by name.

Pfizer’s other marketing tactic was to air a testimonial. We spend two
minutes getting to know Robin, a real-life success story. In her kitchen, over a
lovely soundtrack, Robin tells us how Ben, one of her boys, asked her to stop
smoking. Her doctor prescribed Chantix. As she and her family walk around a
neighborhood of gracious lawns and fall foliage, we hear what good support and a
good drug can do. Back at home, her husband makes coffee while she slices apples
and cheese for a snack at the kitchen table. Radiant, laughing, she says that
Ben finally tired of counting the days since she quit. At the end, an
announcer’s voiceover invites us to “talk to your doctor to find out if
prescription Chantix is right for you.”

But wait a minute — literally. During half the ad, that same announcer is
also telling us about the mental health problems that can be worsened by
Chantix. Not once, but twice, he says what should be alarming words: agitation,
hostility, depressed mood, suicidal thoughts or actions. The words appear yet a
third time in the same ad, in a boxed text at the bottom of the screen.

Why isn’t Pfizer nuts to spend so much money scaring us to death about their
product? While Robin is slicing that apple, why isn’t Pfizer worried that the
voice warning about suicidal thoughts or actions will make us fret whether it’s
safe to let Robin be around sharp objects?

Pfizer’s not worried for the same reason that Bristol-Myers Squibb isn’t
worried about its Abilify ad, with piano music under, showing a happy family’s
outing to a pier, accompanied by a voiceover about seizures, thoughts of
suicide, risk of death or stroke. It’s why Sanofi-aventis, the manufacturer of

Ambien, doesn’t mind spending half an ad (sleeping lady, rooster, harp) warning
of side-effects like sleep-driving and sleep-eating. And it’s why
GlaxoSmithKline is unconcerned about undercutting the effectiveness of its Requip ad
for Restless Leg Syndrome (relaxing lady, crossword puzzle, strings) with
warnings about (this is my favorite) compulsive gambling.

Pictures are more powerful than words. Language and logic don’t have the kind
of immediate access to our brains that images and instruments do. Feeling comes
before thinking. We can be as skeptical about marketing as we like, but media
literacy isn’t much of a match for music. No wonder Plato banished the poet in

The Republic: he couldn’t think of a curriculum that could protect people from
being enthralled by fiction, spellbound by illusion. The bards who sang the
Homeric epics were the ancestors of today’s Mad Men.

Robin’s harmless kitchen knife brilliantly neuters the suicide warnings, as
does the rest of her happy-ending story. In 2005, Duke University researcher Ruth Day presented a study to the FDA demonstrating how ads
can use distracting images and music to minimize attention to risk warnings. Her
infamous example: the fast-fluttering wings of the Nasonex bee (voiced by
Antonio Banderas) prevented viewers from remembering the side effects
information. Partly as a result, last May the FDA issued draft regulations declaring that ads will be judged by their
net impression as a whole, not just whether they’re technically accurate.

Pfizer denies that increased regulatory oversight led them to
raise the time devoted to safety warnings in its Chantix ads from 14 seconds to
a minute. I suspect they could run a two-minute crawl about suicide risks, and
it still wouldn’t distract from Robin’s heartwarming testimonial. We’re suckers
for mini-movies. No wonder the corporations just unleashed by the Supreme Court
to spend unlimited funds on campaign ads are salivating at the opportunity to
enthrall us.

This is my column from The Jewish Journal of Greater Los Angeles.
You can read more of my columns here, and e-mail me there if you’d
like.

Follow Marty Kaplan on Twitter: www.twitter.com/martykaplan

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12/29/2000 – Tis the Season for Drug Pushing

I would hope that you have been carried away by the hustle
and bustle of the Christmas season – celebrating Christmas
as it should be celebrated as you recalled the real purpose
of this holiday season.

Pharmaceutical companies look at this season as the time
of opportunity for recruiting new guinea pigs for their drug
trials. The holidays are a time for families to visit and celebrate
together, but, for some, it can be depressing as they look at a
broken family, loss of a loved one, not enough money for gifts,
etc. In those situations, the drug companies want us to believe
that they have the only answer for those holiday blues – their
little green, blue and pink pills.

Eli Lilly, for one, is most definitely taking advantage of the season
– offering to one and all their own brand of “holiday cheer” – Prozac.
One evening on prime time TV during the CBS Christmas special we
were forced to tolerate their “Welcome back to Prozac” commercial
where we see an athletic young woman jogging through the screen
to come back to Prozac. And another woman in the commercial
opens her shutters to welcome the morning sun again.

The honest commercial would show an overweight woman with
globs of hair falling out, who could barely catch her breath due
to the severe fatigue of the post drug period along with the
involuntary muscle jerking and jumping from the electrical
shocks running through her body. She would also be suffering
the severe panic and anxiety attacks that come with withdrawal
as she then drags herself back to the Prozac bottle! After all,
it is the serious delayed withdrawal with its terrible bouts of
rebound depression caused by the drugs that brings
the large majority of users back to Prozac or any of the
other drugs in the Prozac family of antidepressants.

Then the other woman who opens her shutters would be
welcoming the late afternoon sun, rather than the morning sun,
as she would not be able to get up before noon due to the total
upheaval in her sleep patterns. She would also be covering her
eyes from the sun due to pain the light would cause – a result of
the elevated serotonin levels she is left to deal with after her
first round of Prozac.

Just last month an ad ran in our papers here in Salt Lake City
(better known as “Prozacopolis” or the “Prozac laboratory” due
to our extremely high use of these drugs here) asking for elderly
guinea pigs. The caption above the photo of an elderly oriental
woman read in big bold print “EARN MONEY FOR CHRISTMAS!”
They were offering $750 to those 65 – 85 years of age (most on a
fixed income who could certainly use an extra $750 for Christmas)
to take Prozac for 42 days.

The ad stated that there was no need for these volunteers to be
depressed, but they needed to be healthy in order to take part in
the study. There was no warning at all that these volunteers would
most likely need to use the $750 for burial expenses or for a drug
withdrawal clinic to help them off the drug. And there was no hint
that they might need the extra $750 for additional Prozac to ward
off the terrible withdrawal symptoms.

The drug companies are definitely targeting the weakest among
us – the elderly and the children. Both are far more vulnerable to
the effects ofdrugs as the metabolism is weaker in both plus the
children have systems that are yet developing. US News and
World Report recently published an article on what is going on
with children in the testing of these drugs and the why behind
the testing – extended patents of these drugs bringing in MILLION$
for the drug companies. See it below. Note that the magazine is
protecting their advertising dollars by soft pedaling the most
horrific drug disaster this world has ever faced – the mass
drugging of helpless children with these very powerful
mind-alterning drugs.

How many more mass shootings do we need to witness? How
many more must die to awaken us to the terrible position we are
in as a result of these drugs? The horrors of medical “research”
are indelibly etched in one’s mind with a visit to Auschwitz or
Dachau. The picture of one man grasping his head with both
hands as he screamed out in pain was enough to send me
running out of Dachau as fast as possible and swearing never
to return. The emotions and memory of that experience will be
with me forever. The difference here is that Hitler did not have
mass media to entice people through flowery ads to come to the
camps “drug clinics” willingly to undergo “treatment” and the
human guinea pigs were not offered money to participate in
his horrific medical research projects.

If using the most helpless and dependent upon us as guinea
pigs does not incur the wrath of God as we have never seen
before, I do not know what will. Surely this must serve as a
wake up call to the terrible state of our society. If it does not,
we are not worth saving as a world, as a country, or as a people.

A pharmacist who has witnessed many of his customers end up
with criminal charges after using SSRI antidepressants stated to
me only a few months ago that he fears that in the next 10 to 20
years we will see thousands of “little Hitlers” running around as a
result of our use of these drugs on our children. He then pleaded
with me, “Please tell me that you and I are not the only ones who
see this!”

I urge you to not sit back in silence a moment longer. There is not a
family in our country that has not been adversely affected in some
way by these drugs at this point. Escaping this mass drugging of
our population is impossible in our world today. We are all surrounded
by it and must address such a serious assault on life as we know it. If
you have not yet done so, please contact local radio stations, television
stations, newspapers, government officials, police and firemen who have
to deal with the end result of these drugs, and give them our website as
a reference. Ask them to have one of our directors on as a guest on a
show to discuss this issue. Then warn your own families, friends and
neighbors before you are faced with a death you that you might have
been able to prevent by sharing this information. Stop worrying about
how someone will react to your message. Think of how you will feel
knowing that you did nothing to save a life or several lives that are
now gone as a result of these drugs.

We cannot stand by and watch this happen any longer – especially
at this time of year. I know of no greater gift we can give this
Christmas season than one of truth and life and health and
peace of mind – a life free of these drugs.

Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive Director,
International Coalition For Drug Awareness
www.drugawareness.org

http://www.usnews.com/usnews/issue/000417/nycu/kids.htm

Drug companies are clamoring for kids, but scrutinize the study before
signing up

By Stacey Schultz

Five-year-old Emily Morock is being very brave. As the nurse at Children’s
Mercy Hospital in Kansas City, Mo., draws blood from her left arm, the small
girl watches, fascinated, and doesn’t flinch. It wasn’t so easy for little
Teyonna Latimer, also 5, who, moments earlier, kicked and screamed as her
mom and a nurse held her still for a needle stick.

The girls are not sick: They are enduring the needles in the name of
science. Like thousands of children across the country, Emily and Teyonna
are taking part in a clinical trial of a drug approved for adults but never
studied in children–in this case an antihistamine. Doctors at Children’s
Mercy Hospital are trying to figure out how much is needed to relieve
allergies in a small child. “Up until a few years ago, if you had a
200-pound man and the dose was 200 mg, you would guess that a child who
weighs 10 pounds should get 10 mg,” says Kathy Johnson, clinical research
coordinator at the hospital. “But there is so much more we need to
understand about drug metabolism before we give medicines to young
children.”

A concerted drug-testing effort is filling that gap. In 187 pediatric trials
now planned or underway, researchers are studying the safety of
antidepressants, the proper doses of heart medication, and the best ways to
use potent antibiotics, among other things. The boom was sparked in 1997
when Congress granted drug companies an extra six months of patent
exclusivity, potentially worth millions of dollars, for medicines tested in
children; after December, the Food and Drug Administration will require that
virtually all new drugs be tested in kids.

“I have been doing pediatric research for 25 years,” says Philip Walson,
professor of pediatric pharmacology and pharmacy at Ohio State University.
“And I can honestly say that there has been more research done in the past
three years than in all the others combined.”

Risk and reward.
The effort will require more than 17,000 children–and increasing numbers of
doctors are asking parents to sign up their kids. The decision of an adult
to enter a clinical trial is rarely easy; deciding to sign up a child can be
even trickier.

Some experts worry that the rush to test drugs in kids has led to ethically
questionable behavior, such as taking children off a standard medication to
study the effects of a newer one or offering families large sums of money
for taking part. On the plus side, children in trials get close medical
attention and a chance to make a difference to other kids.

For sick children, a study of a new drug also offers a chance of getting
more-effective therapy. And the risks are small, providing parents choose
trials conducted by experts in pediatric medicine and closely supervised by
local review boards.

Prescribing drugs for children is a kind of experiment in any case, medical
researchers are quick to point out, because 80 percent of the drugs given to
kids have been tested only in adults.

Under FDA regulations, doctors are free to use these drugs in children, but
dosages and toxic effects can be guesswork. In rare cases, those guesses
have been fatally wrong. Decades ago, chloramphenicol, an FDA-approved
antibiotic, killed several infants when it accumulated to toxic levels in
their systems. Doctors later discovered that children do not metabolize the
drug the same way adults do. “We didn’t study it in kids before we gave it
to them,” says Dianne Murphy, associate director for pediatrics at the FDA.
“And we really didn’t understand the harm we were causing.”

The new wave of trials addresses the problem by testing approved drugs in
healthy kids like Emily and Teyonna, to see how their bodies process the
drugs, and by comparing the effectiveness of different drugs in sick kids.
No clinical research is without risks, says Ralph Kauffman, director of
medical research at Children’s Mercy Hospital, but the hazards of pediatric
clinical trials usually amount to inconvenience, not danger. “Studies may
include additional visits to the doctor, extra blood tests, X-rays, and
urine samples,” Kauffman says. “These are not things that inflict lasting
harm on a child.”

Most drugs tested in children have been studied previously in adults,
Kauffman adds. “There is always a small risk of an adverse reaction to a
drug,” he says. But because kids are so closely monitored in clinical
trials, “children are at much lower risk of an adverse event in a study than
they are taking a drug that has never before been tested.”

Still, parents have been spooked by rare but well-publicized clinical trial
disasters such as the death last fall of 18-year-old Jesse Gelsinger in a
study of gene therapy at the University of Pennsylvania. “You ask some
parents to join a clinical trial, and they immediately turn off,” says
Jeffrey Blumer, professor of pediatrics and pharmacology at Case Western
Reserve University School of Medicine in Cleveland.

Other participants sour later, when they discover that their child got the
old therapy during a trial of a new drug or got a dose of the new medication
too small to do any good. When a family doctor or pediatrician suggests
joining a clinical trial, Blumer says, parents should check out who is
running it. Look for researchers who have university affiliations, he
advises, because university-based research often gets more careful ethical
scrutiny.

Committees of experts called institutional review boards (IRBs) act as the
ethical watchdogs, and university-based hospitals are likely to have an IRB
on site, rather than relying on a centralized IRB that may not monitor
individual trials as carefully. On trial. Mark Brown, associate professor
of clinical pediatrics at the University of Arizona, learned how big the
difference can be when he tried to recruit patients for a trial of a new
asthma drug. The study sought kids with asthma who were not already taking
inhaled antinflammatory drugs. “Our IRB felt that it would be unethical to
take a child off medication if it was already controlling the condition,”
Brown says. Every asthmatic child his office could identify was already on
medication, preventing him from recruiting a single patient.

But just blocks away another doctor who was also taking part in the study
exceeded his quota. The reason: The physician encouraged patients to stop
their medication and join the trial. Brown suspects a less stringent IRB had
OK’d this potentially risky step. Parents should also get a full explanation
of the purpose and plan of the study, along with potential risks and
benefits.

Emily’s mother says that a nurse called her and explained the trial. Later,
she signed a six-page consent form detailing the same information. Ben
Wilfond, a bioethicist at the National Institutes of Health, says parents
should discuss these materials with their child’s primary-care physician as
well as with the study staff. “Take your time making the decision,” Wilfond
says. “If someone is trying to pressure you to sign up, that’s a red flag.”
Don’t be surprised if the trial organizers offer money or gifts.

Roughly a quarter of pediatric studies pay for participation, typically from
$200 to $400, according to Jonathan Rackoff, a researcher at NIH. Emily and
Teyonna both received $200 for their cooperation. NIH’s Wilfond says
incentives are not necessarily unethical. But some studies are offering
$1,000 or more, which bothers Wilfond: “When the money becomes too large and
distorts people’s judgment, that’s a problem.”

Ultimately, experts say, taking part in a well-run trial can be rewarding
for children. They stand to gain a sense of pride in helping other kids and,
along the way, learn a little bit about medical science. Loren Persley, a
16-year-old from Kansas City who entered a study of an antihypertensive drug
last year, says she was paid about $400. But her favorite part of the study
wasn’t the cash. It was staying overnight in the hospital and watching
technicians test her blood in the lab. “I got to see a readout on paper of
how high the levels of the drug were in my blood,” Persley says. “I had so
much fun, the money didn’t really matter to me.” But, she adds, “it was a
nice way to say thank you.”

© U.S.News & World Report Inc. All rights reserved. Disclaimer

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Kerri’s Story – My Dark Place on Psychotropic Drugs and ECT

“I had the “electric jitz which feels literally like hot coals inside your back.”

 

An Introduction by Ann Blake-Tracy

I am so concerned at how many I continue to see go through ECT because of reactions they are having to the SSRIs that doctors refuse to see! There is absolutely no need for someone to go through the additional trauma and damage caused by forced seizure activity from an electrical current when what is needed is withdrawal from the offending medication. And why do these doctors remain ignorant of the fact that ECT contraindicated while on SSRI medication due to the risk of the life threatening reaction of “Serotonin Syndrome”? We continue to suffer from an abundance of ignorance about these meds.
———-
I wanted to share my story as a psychiatric drug survivor. I am a college student, I was a senior earlier but this year I had withdraw because of the above problem (i.e. psychiatric drugs) so next year I am to have my senior year.
In August I went to the doctor to refill my anxiety med, Xanax, and because I was concerned with my increasing number of panic attacks. The nurse practitioner refused to give me klonopin (my friend is on that for her anxiety) and instead thrust Paxil at me.

She told me I would “feel crummy for a week” but that after 6-8 weeks it would help my anxiety attacks and it would feel like I wasn’t on anything at all. Stupidly and to my detriment I believed her. I was put on 10 mg. I only lasted 6 days on the stuff! I lost 10 pounds in that period, was dry-heaving and horribly nauseated, I had the “electric jitz” which feels literally like hot coals inside your back (I swear that to God!), palpitations, WORSE anxiety that could not be diminished, I became detached, was unable to concentrate, was crying uncontrollably, had awful stomach gas so tight I couldn’t breathe, had breathing problems, my period lasted 11 days and was heavier than I could ever remember it being, I was constipated, then I had constant diarrhea. Then my thoughts started to race. I went back to the doctor and he just looked at me and asked me why didn’t I just take my Xanax for the anxiety! They told me I was fine, and that it was panic and that I’d be fine. But oh no, fine was the last thing I was. I tried to keep working at my job and had to quit, went back to school and they found me a psychiatrist, who told me that I’d get better and that there were lots of things out there to help me. So he tried me on Celexa.

I was now TERRIFIED of the SSRIs so I didn’t want to, but I tried it for 2 days and stopped it because it made my jitteriness much worse again. So then Dr. H gave me Desipramine. I tried to go to classes, but finally had to withdraw because the meds were making me sicker and sicker and more depressed. I was now down to 84 pounds. This was in early October. My parents took me home to GA, where we found a meds doctor, Dr. W. I slipped farther and farther into the abyss, and then suddenly the Desipramine lifted my mood. It worked like that for ten days, but all the while the racing thoughts were prominent, and my hands kept shaking, and I was well, “high.” Then it kicked out.

So Dr. W upped my dosage (I was at 150 mg) too 200mg, and overdosed me, so I wound up in the hospital because apparently I was threatening to throw myself over the railing of our house or something. (NOTE: not once during the whole ordeal did I ever attempt anything, I merely thought about it).

I saw a Dr. K, there, and he started me on Effexor. This med didn’t work, and it never did anything too bad to my body or mind. Finally, since that wasn’t working, Dr. K put me on this stuff called Risperdal and Depakote. He overdosed me again!! My parents tell me (I have no recollection of this and am thankful to God that I don’t) that I was literally running up and down the stairs because my body couldn’t keep still, the tremors were so bad.

Dr. K wound up going on vacation, and this great doctor, Dr. A. filled in for him. I knew one thing. Dr. A. did ECT. Dr. A. suggested I try Prozac (I was even more terrified after both Paxil, Celexa, and the other meds) but apparently I asked him if I could get ECT done since I knew it was the very last resort and I didn’t really think I’d like to stay like that for the rest of my life. So I got the ECT and within 3 treatments, I was COMPLETELY BACK TO NORMAL. I had all my feelings back, I was ME, I was peppy like usual, I felt terrific! I wish I could remember how it was to wake up that way. My mother told me that I went to sleep and woke up at 4 one afternoon, completely myself again. It was a true miracle. Apparently this is very unusual with ECT because it’s supposed to take many more treatments before you are anywhere near well. After I was done with he ECT the doctors still had me on Prozac.

While I will ill, all I ever said were 3 things: 1) “I’m never going to get better” 2) It’s permanent brain damage” and 3) I want to die. So the idiot doctors diagnosed me as OCD. So I’m fine by February, but all of a sudden my body starts rejecting the Prozac. My vision started blurring out (this was also because of the ECT medication), my anxiety level was rising (I was popping an anxiety pill every 2 days at this point), my limbs were twitching and jumping, I was getting more of that awful stomach gas, and I was starting to get scared. So I made my doctor get me off it and he let me stop it abruptly (since doing that with the other SSRIs is hazardous to your health!!!) and now I am only on 7 mg of Remeron which I am getting off of late this month.

I wanted to sue because of all the losses I suffered this year including: my mental and physical health; my dumping my boyfriend while I was stoned on tranquilizers, the loss of my senior year of college with friends that I have been with for the last 4 years, all the trouble getting reinstated at my college, the nightmares, my fear of even taking ibuprofen for a headache, or even a vitamin, my hatred of psychiatric medicines, therapists, and the drug companies, my fear of going back to that dark place, all that lost time!!!! But I can’t sue because I’m not in the mood to wait a few years for any decision.

So I am just going to file with the FDA. Thank you for reading this, if I sent this wrong, please post it up on this site for me.

God bless you for your intelligence on these matters.

Kerri

 

Years 2000 and Prior

This is Survivor Story number 50.
Total number of stories in current database is 96

 

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Weight Gains on Effexor ER

“In less than a year I have gone from 120lbs to more than 200lbs.”

 

After I had my daughter I became depressed and my family doctor put me on Zoloft and lorazipam. Around the same time my OBGYN put me on the Deproprevara shot for birth control. When I rapidly gained weight the doctor suspected the Deproprevara. I was taken off of it and my Zoloft script was increased. My family doctor said that this would help with weight loss as well as the depression. Why not kill two birds with one stone?

The weight came off but every 3 months or so I noticed that my depression, along with panic and anxiety attacks, would return and be worse, so the Zoloft and lorazipam scripts continued to be increased in dosage. When I approached my family doctor about my concerns on the increased dosage without relief she suggested that I change medications. I was immediately switched to Effexor XR.
I am still taking Effexor XR and since I switched, my weight gain has been tremendous. I am also sleeping most of the day, and I crave alcohol. I am a smoker but as of late, I have increased my habit from less than a pack a day to about 2 and 1/2 packs a day.

In less than a year I have gone from 120lbs to more than 200lbs (I am 5’6″, and 27yrs old). When I started these drugs I was a water aerobics instructor, and taught 6hrs of swimming lessons Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays. Now I can barely get out of bed in the afternoon to clean the house. I need help. I know what it does to me body and brain when I simply miss a dosage, let alone quit it completely.

D.R.

 

8/17/2000

This is Survivor Story number 14.
Total number of stories in current database is 96

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