ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Murder-Suicide: Four Dead: Oregon

Paragraph three reads:  “The reports also indicates that Clackamas
County Sheriff’s Sgt. Jeffrey A. Grahn was taking antidepressants that
can trigger suicidal thoughts. Grahn also told witnesses he had a
couple of drinks before heading out on what would become a horrific
shooting rampage.”

Last three paragraphs read:  “He then grabbed Charlotte and hustled
her out a door near the bandstand. Once out in the alley, he pulled a
.40-caliber Glock 27 semiautomatic pistol from his sweatshirt pocket,
placed it against her head and fired.”

“Grahn then went back into the club and shot Schulmerich in the back
of the head, execution-style. He shot Hoffmeister in the face.”

“In the ensuing chaos, Grahn went back out in the alley, put the
pistol in his mouth and fired his fourth fatal shot.”

http://www.oregonlive.com/gresham/index.ssf/2010/02/post.html

Reports detail jealousy, suspicion behind Clackamas sergeant’s murder-suicide

By Rick Bella, The Oregonian

February 26, 2010, 6:15PM

GRESHAM — In the end, age-old jealousy and suspicion fueled an
off-duty sheriff’s sergeant’s blinding rage, culminating in a Feb. 12
triple murder-suicide at a Gresham lounge.

Complete report online
Gresham police released the complete report Friday into the Feb. 12
shooting rampage at the M&M Lounge.
That’s the conclusion that emerges from hundreds of pages of
investigative reports released Friday by Gresham police.

The reports also indicates that Clackamas County Sheriff’s Sgt.
Jeffrey A. Grahn was taking antidepressants that can trigger suicidal
thoughts. Grahn also told witnesses he had a couple of drinks before
heading out on what would become a horrific shooting rampage.

The reports, forming a two-inch-thick stack, detail interviews with 53
witnesses, seven members of victims’ families and eight other people.
In all, 40 police officers from Gresham, Troutdale, Fairview, Oregon
State Police and the Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office worked on the
reports.

 Also Friday, the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office released a
separate report on a 2009 investigation of domestic abuse allegations
against the same sergeant.

The reports provide new information about the Grahns’ relationship and
Jeffrey Grahn’s actions.

According to interviews, Grahn and his wife, Charlotte M. Grahn, were
trying to repair what had been a volatile marriage. Grahn had moved
back to their Boring-area home after ending an affair with a Clackamas
County Courthouse employee.

Meanwhile, Grahn had tried to befriend other women through Facebook,
at one time carrying on sexually tinged conversations with a married
woman, all while telling friends he suspected his wife was cheating.

On Feb. 12, Charlotte Grahn and four friends went on a “ladies night
out” to Gresham’s Fourth Street Brewing Co. for dinner. Two friends
then went home, and Charlotte Grahn continued on to the M&M Lounge &
Restaurant with Kathleen Hoffmeister and Victoria Schulmerich to hear
some music.

Around 9:45 p.m., Jeffrey Grahn drove up to the M&M in a white pickup
and bulled his way into the crowded lounge and confronted his wife,
who was sitting at a table with Hoffmeister and Schulmerich. Grahn
then picked up a glass of beer and threw it in Schulmerich’s face,
yelling “What are you doing, bringing my wife into a place like
this?!”

He then grabbed Charlotte and hustled her out a door near the
bandstand. Once out in the alley, he pulled a .40-caliber Glock 27
semiautomatic pistol from his sweatshirt pocket, placed it against her
head and fired.

Grahn then went back into the club and shot Schulmerich in the back of
the head, execution-style. He shot Hoffmeister in the face.

In the ensuing chaos, Grahn went back out in the alley, put the pistol
in his mouth and fired his fourth fatal shot.

— Rick Bella


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DEPRESSION MED: Murder-Suicide: Man Shoots three Deputies: Kills One

Paragraph five reads:  “Fresno Police Chief Jerry Dyer
said Friday that Liles
had been taking medication
for depression and probably took his own life with a gunshot to the
head.”

http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-minkler27-2010feb27,0,2450243,full.story

A slow burn suddenly turns deadly in Minkler, Calif.

First there was a series of fires in the small town east of Fresno. Then
came the shootings. On Thursday, a shootout left a sheriff’s deputy dead and two
other law enforcement officers injured.

(Paul Sakuma /
Associated Press / February 26, 2010)

By Diana Marcum

February
27, 2010

Reporting from Minkler ­ Trouble had been brewing in tiny
Minkler, a Sierra foothills community about 20 miles east of Fresno, for months.
But residents never envisioned that it would end with two people — one a
sheriff’s deputy — dead and two other law enforcement officers
wounded.

Joel Wahlenmaier, 49, a veteran with the Fresno County Sheriff’s
Department who investigated homicides and other violent crimes, was killed in
Thursday’s gunfire. Deputy Mark Harris, 48, was injured.

Javier Bejar, a
Reedley police officer who responded to the call for backup in the minutes after
Wahlenmaier was shot, is on life support at Community Regional Medical Center in
Fresno and is not expected to survive.

The suspect, Ricky Ray Liles, 51,
died during the gun battle that erupted when authorities attempted to serve him
with a search warrant.

Fresno Police Chief Jerry Dyer said Friday that
Liles had been taking medication for depression and probably took his own life
with a gunshot to the head.

Liles had told his wife “that he would not go
to prison,” Dyer said at a news conference. “He would take the lives of several
officers before taking his own life.”

On Friday, what there is of Minkler
was cordoned off as a crime scene, helicopters buzzing overhead.

But
Minkler’s worries began about five months ago with small fires. A bunch of
leaves here, a patch of grass there.

“You’d come out and say, ‘How did
that tractor seat catch on fire?’ ” said rancher Jeff Rodenbeck,
51.

Eventually, a shed and a trailer burned. Then the shootings started.
Someone shot up the Minkler Cash Store six times since January. On Monday,
someone fired four bullets into Sally Minkler’s mobile home.

“Sally said
she bent over to get her cellphone and the bullet went right where her torso had
been,” said Mary Novack, who runs the Minkler Cash Store, the nerve-center and
commercial entirety of Minkler, a town so small it once was listed for sale on
EBay.

Residents were convinced the culprit was Liles, a former security
guard renting a mobile home on Minkler family property across from the
store.

“He was just your average pasty white guy with a bad back,” said
Jeff Butts, who grows grapes and plums along the Kings River.

“But when
you know all your neighbors, you look around and say, ‘Well, I know it’s not
Mary, and it’s not Charlie and it’s not Sally’ . . . and pretty soon everyone
came up with Liles,” Butts said. “He wasn’t friends with anyone. But no one ever
actually saw anything they could prove. Things were getting tense out
here.”

On Thursday morning, Novack was relieved when she saw law
enforcement vehicles pull up to Liles’ place. She called Butts and told him cops
were about to knock on Liles’ door.

“Hey, this guy is finally going down,
let’s go to the store and watch,” Butts said he told one of his
workers.

A small crowd gathered on the front porch of the general store,
which has held court in Minkler since 1920. They watched as a deputy kicked in
the door, shots were fired, an officer slumped, more law enforcement came and a
prolonged gun battle raged.

“I was stunned. I didn’t even get down,”
Butts said. “I kept thinking, ‘What are they doing? Those can’t be real
bullets.’ The cops are saying hundreds of rounds were fired, but it had to be
thousands.”

He was incredulous when a woman, later identified as Liles’
wife, Diane, and a dog emerged from the trailer. “I don’t see how anyone came
out of that alive,” Butts said.

Half a mile down the road, Rodenbeck
heard the first volley of shots. He loaded a pistol and rifle, and got his wife
and teenage daughter away from the house in case gunmen emerged from the woods
behind their home. Then he went to see what was going on.

When the bigger
gun battle began, he crouched inside his truck’s tire well.

“Look, this
is the country, gunfire is not a big deal, you hear it all the time. Someone’s
shooting at coyotes. Or skeet,” he said. “But this was a war zone. It sounded
like the cops had automatic rifles and they kept shooting. If you’d been here,
you would have hit the ground. It rocked this place. He killed a cop right in
front of them, and they don’t take lightly to that and I can’t say I blame
them.”

Rodenbeck moved to Minkler from Huntington Beach to raise his
family away from the city. He likes the beauty — “this is river bottom, green
all the time” — the quiet, and the fact that men such as Charles Minkler, the
great-grandson of Orzo Minkler, who founded the town in 1892, can still load
1,000 bales of hay. Minkler is in his 70s.

“Out here, men don’t get old.
They get beat up and wrinkled, but they don’t use canes,” Rodenbeck said. “They
have chores to do.”

But he was never under any illusion that violence
couldn’t touch this place.

“They say they used to hang people from that
tree over there,” he said. “Charlie can tell you about the bandits that used to
hide out in these hills. Different people have different reasons for wanting to
be out somewhere quiet.”

Novack, 54, recalls drug-dealing motorcycle
gangs in the 1970s. As a teenager, she glimpsed white-robed Ku Klux Klan members
burning crosses at the river’s edge.

“That’s a sight you never forget,”
Novack said. “It’s chilling.”

She looked around at the orchards in bloom,
snow-dusted peaks and sheepdogs trying to make friends with the
police.

“People are saying, ‘In Minkler? It’s so beautiful and quiet
there.’ But good and evil are everywhere,” she said. “Right in front of you.
Right next to each other all the time.”

metrodesk@latimes.com

Marcum is a
special correspondent for The Times.

The Associated Press contributed to
this report.

Copyright © 2010, The Los Angeles
Times

ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Murder-Suicide: Father Kills Two Children & Self: Ohio

Paragraph 12 reads:  ” ‘Daniel is in counseling and
on antidepressants,
the detective
wrote.”

http://www.dispatch.com/live/content/local_news/stories/2009/12/05/murder-suicide_westerville_f.ART_ART_12-05-09_A1_3TFT8G8.html?sid=101

Were their deaths preventable?
As details of the Westerville

murdersuicide emerge, there are questions about what was known of the family,
when and by whom
Saturday,  December 5, 2009 3:10 AM
By
Theodore Decker, John Futty and Rita Price
THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

CHRIS RUSSELL | Dispatch

A memorial for Nicole and Sarah
Dobson sits outside the home where they were killed by their father. The girls
met with a child-welfare worker, who asked if their dad had hurt them, three
weeks before they died.

Three weeks before their father killed them,
Nicole and Sarah Dobson met with a child-welfare worker who asked whether he had
hurt them.

“The girls denied that they were abused or maltreated,” said
Eric Fenner, executive director of Franklin County Children

Services.

With no physical evidence or statements supporting the
allegations that had been made in a referral, the caseworker saw no grounds to
remove the children from Daniel J. Dobson’s Westerville home, Fenner said
yesterday.

Police say Dobson, divorced this year from the children‘s
mother, Joyce, shot the girls and then himself Thursday in an upstairs bedroom
of the house at 813 Westray Dr., just west of Sunbury Road.

Now the
agency is left to wonder: Were the girls so scared that they lied? And if so,
did investigators, who had been called about the Dobsons twice before, do
everything they could to find the truth?

“A child who is afraid may not
say everything,” said Fenner, who had tears in his eyes as he talked about the
shooting deaths of Nicole, 15, and Sarah, 11. “What worries me is, ‘Did they
reach out to someone? Did they try?’  ”

In early 2008, both girls
reportedly said that, on a scale of 1 to 10, their fear of their father “was
close to 10,” according to the complaint Children Services supplied to
Westerville police.

The report indicated that Mr. Dobson sometimes hurt
the girls by tickling them and bruised them by squeezing them too hard, usually
while he was intoxicated. Sarah reportedly said she “wished she could hurt her

father so he doesn’t kill us.”

But Fenner said those comments came not
from a caseworker but from the person who referred the case to the agency, whose
identity is protected by law. He said those were the type of claims that the
agency was unable to confirm.

Police closed their investigation of the
2008 case as “unfounded” after the mother told them “this whole thing was blown
out of proportion and has been resolved,” a detective’s report
shows.

“Daniel is in counseling and on antidepressants,” the detective
wrote.

Fenner said the agency will investigate and review all its work in
the case. In addition to the recent allegation, he said caseworkers had received
referrals about the treatment of the children in October 2007 and February
2008.

In each case, no abuse was substantiated, although it was clear
that the mother and father had a volatile relationship, Fenner said. “Dad was
drinking; there was some domestic violence.” Franklin County records, however,
show that Dobson had never been charged criminally.

Fenner said the
most-recent complaint, that Dobson had slapped his older daughter on the leg,
came in to the agency on Nov. 2. The caseworker went to the house several times
before finally finding Mr. Dobson at home on Nov. 13.

The caseworker
notified Westerville police about the case, standard practice when a
physical-abuse allegation is made, officials said.

Lt. John Petrozzi said
a detective left a voice mail for Dobson Monday night. Dobson didn’t return the
call.

Petrozzi said information supplied by Children Services indicated
that a therapist alerted the agency about Nicole’s claim that her father slapped
her on the leg “because she wasn’t getting ready for school fast
enough.”

Handwritten notes that Dobson left before killing himself make
no mention of child-abuse allegations. He wrote various notes to his family, his
ex-wife, even his doctor, all on the same notepad. He thanked his family for
their love and support through the years and said there was nothing more they
could have done.

The letters expressed no anger toward his ex-wife, or
anyone else, and said that he had entertained suicidal thoughts for decades and
wanted to spare his daughters pain.

“There will be no more worries for
us,” he wrote.

“I could not stand to see Nicole and Sarah suffering and
could not leave them behind.”

He also left a note at the bottom of the
stairs.

“Joyce, do not come upstairs. Call the police.”

The
Dispatch
reviewed the notes at the Franklin County coroner’s office through
a public-records request.

According to a 911 call from the younger girl’s
principal, which led to the discovery of the bodies, school administrators were
aware of domestic problems.

Kathleen Norris, the principal of St. Paul
Elementary School in Westerville, called 911 Thursday after Sarah failed to show
up for school and her father didn’t report her absence.

In her call,
Norris was asked by a 911 operator whether Daniel Dobson might harm
Sarah.

“Mother feels that, yes, but I have, I have no proof,” Norris
said. “She was worried.”

She described the parents’ relationship as
“adversarial.”

After 10 years of marriage, Mr. Dobson filed for the
divorce in August 2008 and it was granted in May. He kept the house and agreed
to a shared-parenting plan with his ex-wife. Nicole was to live primarily with
her father, and Sarah would move between their homes on a week-to-week basis,
court records show.

Although the girls were not in school on Wednesday,
Petrozzi said detectives think they weren’t killed until sometime Thursday
morning, possibly before dawn.

What the three did during the day on
Wednesday is unclear, though he said he thought the girl’s mother spoke to one
or both girls Wednesday morning, and a neighbor reported seeing Mr. Dobson in
his garage about 9 p.m. Wednesday.

Franklin County Coroner Jan Gorniak
could not pinpoint a time of death but said the girls and their father likely
died Wednesday night or Thursday morning. She said all died of single shotgun
wounds to the head.

Fenner said cases involving domestic violence can be
difficult for child-welfare agencies, partly because fear and threats are more
difficult to substantiate — and to read on children‘s faces — than physical
abuse and neglect.

He said the agency is developing a special unit that
will have more training.

“This is an area we want to strengthen,” he
said. “We want to find out how we can, within the confines of the law, delve
deeper.”

tdecker@dispatch.com

jfutty@dispatch.com

rprice@dispatch.com

ANTIDEPRESSANT: Murder-Suicide: Mother Strangles her 2 Children: Kills Self

Paragraph 10 reads:  “Lo Wai-fan, a psychiatrist at East
Kowloon General Out-patient Clinic, said she met Lau in late October last
year
and prescribed her two-week’s worth of sleeping and
anti-depression drugs.
However, Lau turned up at the clinic on
November 6 – a week before her scheduled follow-up session – saying she was
suffering from insomnia and worrying about her son.”

Paragraphs three
through five read:  “But divorcee Lau Hoi-chu, 43, was released from Kwai
Chung Hospital on November 25 last year – two days before her mainland
friend Chen Shaozhen found Lau hanging in a bedroom
next to the body of

her son, Law Chung-yan, 16.

Her daughter, Law Yu-ching, 13, was
unconscious in another room in a flat in Lok On House, Tsz Lok Estate, Tsz Wan
Shan.

All three were certified dead by paramedics. The children were
apparently strangled.

http://www.thestandard.com.hk/news_detail.asp?pp_cat=11&art_id=90995&sid=26191271&con_type=3

Tormented mom told carers `she was ready
to kill’ –

Diana Lee

Tuesday,
November 24, 2009

A mentally-disturbed mother who was found hanged in

her flat near the strangled bodies of her two children told a psychiatrist she
“wanted to take her son’s life and then her own” three weeks before they died, a
coroner’s inquest was told yesterday.

Concerned she might injure herself
and others, she was sent to hospital for compulsory observation.

But
divorcee Lau Hoi-chu, 43, was released from Kwai Chung Hospital on November 25
last year – two days before her mainland friend Chen Shaozhen found Lau hanging
in a bedroom next to the body of her son, Law Chung-yan, 16.

Her

daughter, Law Yu-ching, 13, was unconscious in another room in a flat in Lok On
House, Tsz Lok Estate, Tsz Wan Shan.

All three were certified dead by
paramedics. The children were apparently strangled.

Testifying before a
jury of five, Chen said she took care of the children when Lau was in hospital.

She had a meal with the family shortly before their deaths and Lau
appeared to be at peace with her children.

Among the exhibits presented
in court was a calendar on which was scribbled “afraid to be admitted to
hospital again.”

In a written statement, Lau’s sister-in-law, Chen
Jianqing, said she moved into the flat on November 23 to help look after the
children together with Chen Shaozhen but on November 26 Lau told her not to
spend the night in the flat.

Lo Wai-fan, a psychiatrist at East Kowloon
General Out-patient Clinic, said she met Lau in late October last year and
prescribed her two-week’s worth of sleeping and anti-depression drugs. However,
Lau turned up at the clinic on November 6 – a week before her scheduled
follow-up session – saying she was suffering from insomnia and worrying about

her son.

Lau’s son, a Secondary Four student, had just been put on
probation for shoplifting.

“Lau was emotional and believed there was no
hope for the future. She said she wanted to end her son’s life before she ended
hers,” Lo said.

Fearing she might hurt herself and others, Lo had her
admitted to Kwai Chung Hospital under the Mental Health Ordinance for compulsory
psychiatric observation of at least seven days.

Kwong Lap-kuen, a
medical social worker, observed Lau and agreed with Lo’s diagnosis.

Chan
Wai-ping, an assistant social worker in the Social Welfare Department, said she
talked with Lau for more than an hour on November 19, during which she was calm
though she did express concern about finding a secondary school for her
daughter.

“She said it was just out of impulse when she said she wanted
to hurt herself and her son. She regretted what she had said, as she couldn’t
take care of her children while she was in hospital,” Chan said.

Lau
also wrote notes to remind herself of a “better tomorrow” and that “issues
concerning the growing up of the children do not equate to failure on my part.”

Lau’s ex-husband, Law Chi-pun, said he had not contacted her since 2006,
nor given her alimony.

ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Murder-Suicide: Father Kills Son (22) & Self: California

Last paragraph reads:  “The victims are reportedly Ardo
Novarro, 55, and his 22-year-old son, Noel. Neighbors said the father had
been taking antidepressants a
nd appeared grief-stricken over the
death of his wife earlier in the year.”

http://www.760kfmb.com/Global/story.asp?S=11121686

Police investigating possible murdersuicide in Paradise
Hills

Posted: Sep 13, 2009 11:37 AM CDT Updated: Sep 13,
2009 12:01 PM CDT
[]

Autopsies are scheduled Saturday for a father and son believed to
have been killed in a murdersuicide in Paradise Hills.

A friend who
went to check on the men in a house on Sylvy Way near Omega Drive looked in a
window, saw what appeared to be two bodies and called 911 about 2 p.m. Saturday,
according to the Medical Examiner’s Office.

Neighbors said they heard
several shots coming from the home Wednesday night. Authorities said a handgun
was found near the bodies.

The victims are reportedly Ardo Novarro, 55,
and his 22-year-old son, Noel. Neighbors said the father had been taking

antidepressants and appeared grief-stricken over the death of his wife earlier
in the year.

Glaxo Said to Have Paid $1 Billion So Far to Settle Various Paxil Lawsuits

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy:

Excellent article! Many would still be alive and many more
would have avoided being damaged had they been able to see this coming as
clearly as I did years ago when I began warning about these drugs. But it is not
over! There will tragically be many more losses due to the ability of drug
manufacturers to buy the silence this doctor from Tufts says below should
not happen. These settlements need to be made public!

The one glaring omission in this article is a case I am very
familiar with Tobin vs Glaxo. This Paxil-induced murder/suicide
case was allowed to go to court, rather than being settled by Glaxo.
And after hearing all the evidence the jury ruled
that it was clear that Paxil was the main cause of this tragic
murder/suicide that cost 4 lives in one WY family. They ordered Glaxo to pay
$6.3 Million – in my opinion a very small amount for four lives!

But it will not be the end of these types of cases being filed.
The authors did not figure the losses Glaxo will face from those cases
of murder/suicide so their losses could be far greater than detailed
below.

Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive Director
International Coalition for Drug Awareness
Author: Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin
Nightmare & Help! I Can’t Get Off My Antidepresant!

The company hasn’t specified in regulatory filings
the number of suicide, birth-defect and addiction cases settled.

“It’s important to disclose such settlements because
it raises the red flag for both doctors and patients that there might be a
problem,” said Dan Carlat, a psychiatrist at Tufts University School of Medicine
in Boston who writes and edits a
blog and a monthly

Psychiatry
Report
. “It would motivate
doctors to dig into the literature even more before prescribing these
drugs.”

  • About 450 suicide-related Paxil cases were settled. Only about a dozen
    haven’t been, the people said. The $1 billion total doesn’t include more than
    600 claims that Paxil caused birth defects.
  • A Philadelphia jury on Oct. 13 found the drugmaker should pay $2.5 million
    to the family of Lyam Kilker, a 3-year-old boy born with a heart defect after
    his mother took Paxil while pregnant. Based on that outcome, an analyst
    estimated the company may potentially face additional verdicts in birth-defect
    cases waiting to be tried in Pennsylvania.
  • 600 More Cases
  • “A liability totaling $1.5 billion is possible,” wrote Savvas Neophytou, a
    Panmure Gordon analyst in London, in a note to investors the day after the
    Kilker verdict.
  • In comparison, Pfizer Inc., parent of Wyeth, the maker of diet-drug
    combination fen-phen, has had to set aside about $21 billion to resolve about
    200,000 personal-injury claims over that medicine. Merck & Co. agreed to
    pay $4.85 billion to resolve more than 48,000 claims over the withdrawn
    painkiller.
  • Harris Pogust, an
    attorney for Paxil plaintiffs, couldn’t confirm the total. He said the amounts
    are confidential.
  • The suicide settlements included a suit over the death of a 14-year-old
    boy who had been taking Paxil for two months. The parents of Scott Cunningham,
    of Valparaiso, Indiana, sued after the boy hung himself in 2001. They alleged
    Glaxo suppressed evidence that Paxil use was linked to the risk of suicide
    attempts by adolescents. Glaxo denied the allegations, according to court
    papers.
  • The family settled its suit in May, according to court filings. Family
    attorney Bijan Esfandiari confirmed the settlement, saying the amount was
    confidential.
  • About 150 cases over suicides by Paxil users were settled for an average
    of about $2 million, and about 300 over suicide attempts settled for an
    average of $300,000, they said. Some of the claims were resolved before suits
    were filed, according to the people familiar with the matter.
  • Glaxo has settled about 10 birth-defect cases, Sean Tracey, a
    Houston-based lawyer who represented the family of a child victim, said in
    court Dec. 2. The settlements averaged about $4 million, the people familiar
    with the cases said.
  • Glaxo paid an average of about $50,000 per case to resolve about 3,200
    claims linking Paxil to addiction problems, the people familiar with the cases
    said.
  • In its 2008 annual report, company officials noted they had reached a
    “conditional settlement agreement” in January 2006 with Paxil users who
    alleged they suffered withdrawal symptoms after taking the drug. The case,
    filed in Los Angeles federal court, was marked closed in court records in
    February.
Glaxo Said to Have Paid $1 Billion to Settle Paxil

Lawsuits

By Jef Feeley and Margaret Cronin Fisk

Dec. 14 (Bloomberg) — GlaxoSmithKline Plc has
paid almost $1 billion to resolve lawsuits over Paxil since it introduced the
antidepressant in 1993, including about $390 million for suicides or attempted
suicides said to be linked to the drug, according to court records and people
familiar with the cases.

As part of the total, Glaxo, the U.K.’s largest drugmaker, so far has paid
$200 million to settle Paxil addiction and birth-defect cases and $400 million

to end antitrust, fraud and design claims, according to the people and court
records.

The $1 billion “would be worse than many people are expecting,” said Navid Malik, an analyst
at Matrix Corporate Capital in London. “I don’t think this is within the
boundaries of current assumptions for analysts.”

The London-based company hasn’t disclosed the settlement total in company
filings. It has made public some accords. Glaxo’s provision for legal and other
non-tax disputes as of the end of 2008 was 1.9 billion pounds ($3.09 billion),
according to its latest annual report. This included all legal matters, not just
Paxil. The company said 112 million pounds of this sum would be “reimbursed by
third-party issuers.”

The drugmaker has reduced its insurance coverage to contain costs, “accepting
a greater degree of uninsured exposure,” the annual report states. “Recent
insurance loss experience, including pharmaceutical product-liability exposures,
has increased the cost of, and narrowed the coverage afforded by, insurance for
pharmaceutical companies generally,” Glaxo said.

Glaxo Comment

Glaxo declined to confirm the $1 billion figure. “Paxil has been on the
market in the U.S. since 1993. Like many other pharmaceutical products, it has
been the subject of different kinds of litigation over the years,” said Sarah Alspach, a
spokeswoman for Glaxo, in an e-mailed statement. “It would be inappropriate and
potentially misleading to aggregate payments in these various types of
litigation.”

Chief Executive Officer Andrew Witty has moved
to replace revenue lost to generic versions of drugs such as Paxil. Worldwide,
Paxil generated about 514 million pounds in sales last year, or 2.1 percent of
the total. Glaxo closed up 5 pence to 1,303 pence in London trading Dec. 11,
down 8.8 percent from a year ago.

About 450 suicide-related Paxil cases were settled. Only about a dozen
haven’t been, the people said. The $1 billion total doesn’t include more than
600 claims that Paxil caused birth defects.

A Philadelphia jury on Oct. 13 found the drugmaker should pay $2.5 million to

the family of Lyam Kilker, a 3-year-old boy born with a heart defect after his
mother took Paxil while pregnant. Based on that outcome, an analyst estimated
the company may potentially face additional verdicts in birth-defect cases
waiting to be tried in Pennsylvania.

600 More Cases

“A liability totaling $1.5 billion is possible,” wrote Savvas Neophytou, a
Panmure Gordon analyst in London, in a note to investors the day after the
Kilker verdict. He still recommended buying Glaxo shares because a likely appeal
may reduce the amount paid by the company.

In comparison, Pfizer Inc., parent of Wyeth, the maker of diet-drug
combination fen-phen, has had to set aside about $21 billion to resolve about
200,000 personal-injury claims over that medicine. Merck & Co. agreed to pay
$4.85 billion to resolve more than 48,000 claims over the withdrawn painkiller.

Harris Pogust, an
attorney for Paxil plaintiffs, couldn’t confirm the total. He said the amounts
are confidential.

Paxil Is Different

Paxil’s been different from most drugs,” said Pogust, a lawyer from
Conshohocken, Pennsylvania, who is handling suicide and withdrawal cases.
“You’ve had three major personal injury litigations over one drug — the
suicide, the birth defect and the withdrawal cases. To have three significant
problems with one drug is really unusual.”

The company had $11.7 billion in U.S. Paxil sales for nine years starting in
1997, according to documents made public this year in a Pennsylvania trial. In
2002, the year before Paxil faced generic competition in the U.S., sales of the
drug there were $2.12 billion. Last year, U.S. sales had fallen to $129 million.
Through September of this year, sales were $52 million, down 52 percent from the
same period in 2008.

Since at least 2003, Glaxo has faced claims in U.S. courts that some Paxil
users were subjected to an undisclosed, higher risk for suicide and birth
defects.

A Suicide Settlement

The suicide settlements included a suit over the death of a 14-year-old boy
who had been taking Paxil for two months. The parents of Scott Cunningham, of
Valparaiso, Indiana, sued after the boy hung himself in 2001. They alleged Glaxo

suppressed evidence that Paxil use was linked to the risk of suicide attempts by
adolescents. Glaxo denied the allegations, according to court papers.

The family settled its suit in May, according to court filings. Family
attorney Bijan Esfandiari confirmed the settlement, saying the amount was
confidential.

About 150 cases over suicides by Paxil users were settled for an average of
about $2 million, and about 300 over suicide attempts settled for an average of
$300,000, they said. Some of the claims were resolved before suits were filed,
according to the people familiar with the matter.

Glaxo has settled about 10 birth-defect cases, Sean Tracey, a Houston-based
lawyer who represented the family of a child victim, said in court Dec. 2. The
settlements averaged about $4 million, the people familiar with the cases said.

Hasn’t Specified

The company hasn’t specified in regulatory filings the number of suicide,
birth-defect and addiction cases settled.

“It’s important to disclose such settlements because it raises the red flag
for both doctors and patients that there might be a problem,” said Dan Carlat, a
psychiatrist at Tufts University School of Medicine in Boston who writes and
edits a blog and a monthly Psychiatry Report. “It would motivate doctors to dig into the
literature even more before prescribing these drugs.”

Glaxo paid an average of about $50,000 per case to resolve about 3,200 claims
linking Paxil to addiction problems, the people familiar with the cases said.

In its 2008 annual report, company officials noted they had reached a
“conditional settlement agreement” in January 2006 with Paxil users who alleged
they suffered withdrawal symptoms after taking the drug. The case, filed in Los
Angeles federal court, was marked closed in court records in February.

Glaxo did not admit liability” in the addiction settlements, the company’s
officials said in a March 2009 filing with the U.S. Securities and Exchange
Commission.

The Other $400 Million

In one of eight accords unrelated to individual suicide, addiction or
birth-defect claims, Glaxo agreed in 2003 to pay $87.6 million to the U.S. and
49 states over claims it repackaged and privately labeled Paxil and another
drug, Flonase, to a health maintenance organization at discounted prices.

Glaxo, denying liability, agreed in 2004 to pay $165 million to settle two
antitrust suits over allegations it engaged in sham patent infringement
litigation to stall approval of generic versions of the drug, court records
show. Of that total, $100 million was for direct purchasers of Paxil, such as
drug wholesalers, and $65 million was for indirect buyers, the records show.

In the same year, Glaxo agreed to pay $2.5 million to New York to resolve
accusations the company withheld safety data about the antidepressant. The
company, calling the claims unfounded, agreed to release safety studies on the
medicine’s effect on children.

In 2005, the company added a black-box warning to its Paxil label that the
drug increased the risk of suicidal thoughts among adolescents, following a
request by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to do so.

The Philadelphia case is Kilker v. SmithKline Beecham Corp. dba
GlaxoSmithKline, 07-001813, Court of Common Pleas, Philadelphia County,
Pennsylvania (Philadelphia).

To contact the reporters on this story: Jef Feeley in
Wilmington, Delaware, at jfeeley@bloomberg.net and; Margaret Cronin Fisk in
Southfield, Michigan, at mcfisk@bloomberg.net.

Last Updated:
December 14, 2009 00:01 EST

ZOLOFT: Wrongful Death Suit Filed in Behalf of the Andrea Roberts’ Family

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy:

FINALLY!!!! A wrongful death suit that states these SSRI
wrongful death cases for what they really are: cold blooded premeditated murder!
When the risk is known and not stated, then what else could it be
other than premeditated murder? If it was an individual, rather than a wealthy
corporation who did this you had better believe they would be facing
premeditated murder charges.
___________________________________________
The label did contain a warning that children and teenagers
may have an increased risk of suicidal thinking, but it did not mention adults
being at risk of committing suicide or that the drug could cause any homicidal
thoughts or actions.

Because of the omissions from the label, the

plaintiffs allege Pfizer committed “fraud, misrepresentation, intentional
infliction of emotional distress, aggravated or gross negligence, battery,
assault, and potentially, premeditated murder.” . . .

“Defendants’
conduct was extreme and outrageous in character, and so extreme in degree as to
go beyond all possible bounds of decency as to be regarded as atrocious and
utterly intolerable in a civilized society,” the suit states.

Suit blames anti-depressant drug for 2007 murder-suicide
10/1/2009 2:43 PM By Marilyn Tennissen

[]

SHERMAN — In a suit recently transferred to the East
Texas federal court, the maker of a popular anti-depressant drug is being blamed
for a murder-suicide committed by a woman who had taken the drug.

Court
papers say that after taking Pfizer’s drug Zoloft, 41-year-old Andrea Roberts

shot and killed her two children and husband before turning the gun on
herself.

Her parents, Glenda and John Robert McCoy, and brother, John
Andrew McCoy, acting pro se, first filed a suit in Denton County on July 31 on
behalf of decedents Jon Andrea Roberts, Michael Roberts, Micayla Roberts and
Dylan Roberts.

Pfizer Inc., Pfizer Chairman Jeffrey Kindler, Pfizer
subsidiary Greenstone Pharmaceuticals and Does 1-50 were named as defendants.


Pfizer had the case transferred to the Sherman Division of
the Eastern District of Texas on Sept. 28.

According to the suit, on
July 24, 2007, Andrea Roberts bought Zoloft from a Tom Thumb Pharmacy in Flower
Mound.

Zoloft is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor prescribed to
patients for many psychiatric conditions and is designed to be taken orally once
a day or more often as directed by a physician.

The suit does not state
why Roberts was taking the medication, how long she had taken it or the doctor
who had prescribed it.


One week after she picked up the prescription, Andrea
Roberts and her family were dead.

Andrea Roberts allegedly shot and
killed her two children Micayla and Dylan, her husband, Michael, and then
committed suicide at their home in Denton on July 31, 2007. According to the

suit, in the days leading up to the incident Roberts had become paranoid and
delusional.

The surviving plaintiffs allege that the product Zoloft

caused these violent acts,” the complaint states. “In the alternative, the
surviving plaintiffs allege that the product Zoloft was a contributing cause
accounting for causing or worsening decedent Andrea Roberts‘ condition to the

point of causing paranoia, psychosis, homicidal thinking or other symptoms
inhibiting her judgment leading to the commission of homicidal and suicidal
actions.”

In its Notice of Removal, Pfizer argues there are many
inconsistencies in the plaintiffs’ complaint.

“Although this action can
be fairly characterized as a products liability case, plaintiffs purport to
assert a wide variety of claims in this lawsuit and their Petition is confusing
and contradictory,” Pfizer states.

The plaintiffs argue that because

Andrea Roberts did not consent to taking “a drug that causes homicide,” she
should be considered “involuntarily intoxicated” and therefore not guilty of
contributory negligence or assumption of risk.

Pfizer knew from reports
and studies that Zoloft could cause homicidal actions, the suit alleges, but
failed to include that information on the drug’s warning label.

The

label did contain a warning that children and teenagers may have an increased
risk of suicidal thinking, but it did not mention adults being at risk of
committing suicide or that the drug could cause any homicidal thoughts or
actions.

Because of the omissions from the label, the plaintiffs allege
Pfizer committed “fraud, misrepresentation, intentional infliction of emotional
distress, aggravated or gross negligence, battery, assault, and potentially,
premeditated murder.”

They also claim a safer alternative design of the

drug existed, but Pfizer “chose to manufacture and the dangerous drug anyway.”

“Defendants’ conduct was extreme and outrageous in character, and so
extreme in degree as to go beyond all possible bounds of decency as to be
regarded as atrocious and utterly intolerable in a civilized society,” the suit

states.

The plaintiffs cite several causes of action throughout the
complaint.

Pfizer argues that while the plaintiffs appear to be
asserting a claim for products liability, they also assert claims for negligent
manufacture, design and marketing; a wrongful death and survival action; and
intentional infliction of emotional distress as well as actual and punitive
damages.

They are also claiming breach of warranty, fraud,
misrepresentation, aggravated or gross negligence, battery, assault and even
murder.


Pfizer writes that the complaint incorrectly lists
Greenstone Pharmaceuticals as a subsidiary of Pfizer when it is not.

In
addition, Jeffrey Kindler is listed as a defendant in the style of the case, but

the petition does not identify him as a party to the case and there are no
allegations against Kindler in the complaint.

As to damages, Pfizer
points out the varying amounts mentioned in the plaintiffs’ petition.

In

one place, the plaintiffs state they are seeking to recover $900,000 in Andrea‘s
lost earnings and $4 million for Michael’s.

Then they ask for $23
million for the products liability claims, $20,000 for funeral and burial costs,
$1 million for each of the surviving plaintiffs and $5 million for each of the

decedents to compensate them for their loss of affection, companionship and
pecuniary support.

At other places in the complaint, it states
plaintiffs are limiting damages to $50,000.

The pro se Plaintiffs’
Petition appears to have been put together using a legal form,” Pfizer writes.

Pfizer is represented by Laura E. De Santos of Clark, Thomas &

Winters PC in Houston. Jack E. Urquhart of Clark, Thomas is of
counsel.

The case has been assigned to U.S. District Judge Michael H.
Schneider and referred to Magistrate Judge A. L. Mazzant.

Case No.
4:09-cv-496-MHS-ALM

ANTIDEPRESSANT: Mother of Columbine killer tells of horror 10 yrs after massacre

Michael Moore obtained a copy of Ann Blake-Tracy’s book at the premiere of his movie Bowling for Columbine. Now listen to his bold statement about what really did cause Columbine.


SEE FULL VIDEO Click here

INFO ON OTHER SCHOOL SHOOTINGS

Mark Taylors Site.
NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy: Michael Moore, after reviewing all
the data on Columbine in making his movie, Bowling for Columbine, made his
message clear in the new movie The Drugging of Our Children about what he NOW
believes caused Columbine. Click on his picture to view his video
statement at www.drugawareness.org

In all of these articles out yesterday in the news covering the story by
Dylan’s mother there is STILL no mention of any medication use on Dylan’s part.
Yet we have a friend of Dylan’s who came forward claiming to have been helping
him withdraw from both Zoloft and Paxil.
But the coroner claims they found nothing in his system (I could go into
why that report is suspect but will save that for another time).
IF there really was nothing in his system, was Dylan in withdrawal from his
SSRIs at that point? We know that withdrawal can produce that same extreme out
of character violence since the REM Sleep Behavior Disorder (RBD) is more
prevalent in the withdrawal from these drugs than while on them. And yet of
those being diagnosed with RBD a staggering 86% were taking an antidepressant!
(To learn more about RBD read my FDA testimony on comedian Phil Hartman and is
wife’s Zoloft-induced murder/suicide – a classic case of RBD also found posted
at www.drugawareness.org.)
And if Dylan had been taking antidepressants were they prescribed to
Dylan? If not, where was he getting them? (Let us point out that anyone can
obtain these drugs easily. They have been sold in the streets since the early
90’s to be used recreationally and samples can be found ANYWHERE. Someone just
let me know that they found a bottle of Effexor in a shoe at a second
hand store!) Was a friend sharing their prescription? It happens regularly
from reports I get from kids. Were either of his parents taking one that he was
using for himself?
Years ago I was called in on a case of a 19 year old who was staying with a
married couple where the wife had been prescribed Zoloft and did not like how it
made her feel. She stopped taking it and placed in on top of the fridge. So when
the young man started feeling a little down he remembered the pills were for
depression and were suppose to help you feel better. So he took a couple, waited
a couple of hours and took more because he still was not feeling any better.
Then again took more a little later expecting to feel better right away. After

about five pills he recalls nothing about stabbing a man over 100 times with a
screwdriver.

Mother
of Columbine killer tells of horror 10 years after massacre

•Susan Klebold says she is haunted by school killings
•’I cannot look at a child without thinking about it’

Columbine High School student Dylan Klebold

Dylan
Klebold pictured in the 1999 Columbine High School yearbook. Photograph:
Reuters/© Ho New

The
mother of one of the two teenagers who murdered a dozen fellow students and a
teacher in the massacre at Columbine high school has broken a decade of

silence to say that she is unable to look at another child without thinking
about the horror and suffering her son caused.

Susan
Klebold, whose son Dylan and another youth, Eric Harris, hunted down pupils at
the Colorado school with shotguns, a semi-automatic pistol and a rifle before
killing themselves, has described her trauma over her son’s actions.

“For
the rest of my life, I will be haunted by the horror and anguish Dylan caused,”
she wrote in O, The Oprah Magazine. “I cannot look at a child in a grocery
store or on the street without thinking about how my son’s schoolmates spent the
last moments of their lives. Dylan changed everything I believed about myself,
about God, about family and about love.”

Neither
the Klebold nor Harris families has spoken about the massacre, in which 21
students were also wounded.

Klebold
recounts how the last word she heard from her son was a gruff goodbye as he
rushed out of the door early on the morning of the killings in April 1999.

“I
was getting dressed for work when I heard Dylan bound down the stairs and open
the front door … I poked my head out of the bedroom. ‘Dyl?’ All he said was
‘Bye.’ … His voice had sounded sharp. I figured he was mad because he’d had
to get up early to give someone a lift to class. I had no idea that I had just
heard his voice for the last time,” she said.

Dylan
Klebold was headed to make a final video with Harris to say goodbye and
apologise to their families before they drove to the school to plant bombs,
which failed to detonate, and to carry through their plan to kill their fellow
students.

After
the killings, the authorities said there were indications that the two youths
were disturbed and hints of the looming catastrophe. Harris’s blog included
instructions on how to make explosives and, later, angry denunciations of
society that attracted the attention of the police after Harris posted a death
threat against another student. Closer to the massacre, Harris listed his
stockpile of weapons and posted a hit list. Klebold was less overt but with
Harris made secret videos of their weapons and wrote in his diary of a desire to
plan an attack that would match the bombing in Oklahoma City by rightwing
militiamen that killed 168 people.

Klebold
writes that she had no idea that Dylan was contemplating killing himself or
anyone else. “From the writings Dylan left behind, criminal psychologists have
concluded that he was depressed and suicidal. I’d had no inkling of the battle
Dylan was waging in his mind,” she wrote.

“Dylan’s
participation in the massacre was impossible for me to accept until I began to
connect it to his own death. Once I saw his journals, it was clear to me that
Dylan entered the school with the intention of dying there. In order to
understand what he might have been thinking, I started to learn all I could
about suicide.”

Five
years after the killings, the FBI said they believe that Harris was a clinical
psychopath who masterminded the plan and Klebold depressive.

The
massacre continues to generate debate about the motives of the two youths and
whether anything could have been done to stop them. The magazine said that Susan
Klebold was not paid for the article and will not be making an appearance on
Oprah Winfrey’s television
show.


ANTIDEPRESSANTS: MURDER/SUICIDE: FATHER KILLS YOUNG SON & SELF: CA

Last paragraph reads:  “The victims are reportedly Ardo
Novarro, 55, and his 22-year-old son, Noel. Neighbors said the father had
been taking antidepressants a
nd appeared grief-stricken over the
death of his wife earlier in the year.”

http://www.760kfmb.com/Global/story.asp?S=11121686

Police investigating possible murdersuicide in Paradise
Hills

Posted: Sep 13, 2009 11:37 AM CDT Updated: Sep 13,
2009 12:01 PM CDT
[]

Autopsies are scheduled Saturday for a father and son believed to
have been killed in a murdersuicide in Paradise Hills.

A friend who
went to check on the men in a house on Sylvy Way near Omega Drive looked in a
window, saw what appeared to be two bodies and called 911 about 2 p.m. Saturday,
according to the Medical Examiner’s Office.

Neighbors said they heard
several shots coming from the home Wednesday night. Authorities said a handgun
was found near the bodies.

The victims are reportedly Ardo Novarro, 55,
and his 22-year-old son, Noel. Neighbors said the father had been taking

antidepressants and appeared grief-stricken over the death of his wife earlier
in the year.