nortriptyline (Pamelor)

Last month I was prescribed a low dose of nortriptyline (10mg) to help with nerve pain. After a week I was told to increase my dose to 20mg. On day 9, I woke up with severe depression. I had been feeling mildly depressed on and off because of chronic pain, but this was different. It was on par with losing a family member or going through a difficult breakup. I couldn’t stop crying all day, and I remember thinking that I just wanted to die. Luckily I knew of the drug’s potential side effects, and I my mom and husband were very supportive. I stopped taking the drug immediately, and the next day I was back to normal, at least emotionally.
There was, however, another side effect that has not gone away, even now after being off it for over a month. Several days after I started taking the drug, I developed an extremely itchy rash on all my toes. My feet also became quite sweaty. The next evening, after my shower, my toes and the ball of one foot became red, hot to the touch, and swollen. The heel and my other foot still felt cool. It went away after about an hour. The same thing happened the next evening to the other foot. It progressed until both feet were flaring up every evening, and the symptoms were lasting all night long. It seemed that it was always triggered by heat. It turns out I had developed a condition called erythromelalgia. My online research has shown a link between SSRIs and erythromelalgia, and I believe that TCAs can have the same effect as well. I’ve read that the excess serotonin in the brain causes the body to stop producing serotonin, and the subsequent depletion of serotonin in the blood then causes a vasodilating effect (hence the redness and swelling).
I can only hope that my body will eventually re-regulate its serotonin levels and these symptoms will eventually go away. The neurologist who prescribed the drug is clueless and very hesitant to admit there is a connection.

nortriptyline (Pamelor)

Elisabeth

3,391 total views, 1 views today

DEPRESSION MED: Well-Known Businessman, 52, Dies in Fall Down Stairs: UK

Paragraph one reads:  “A wellknown Suffolk businessman
fell to his death while on anti-depressives prescribed
after the collapse of his company, an inquest heard.”

Paragraph 11
reads:  “After the hearing, Mr Thomas’s widow Jan Thomas thanked the staff
at the coroner’s office for their support and help and told how the
medication her husband was taking before his death had
made him  ‘
dozy’.”

http://www.eadt.co.uk/content/eadt/news/story.aspx?brand=EADOnline&category=News&tBrand=EADOnline&tCategory=xDefault&itemid=IPED17%20Feb%202010%2023%3A34%3A21%3A990

Businessman‘s stairs fall death remains a mystery

LAURENCE CAWLEY

Last
updated: 2/18/2010 11:56:00 AM

A WELLKNOWN Suffolk businessman fell
to his death while on anti-depressives prescribed after the collapse of his
company, an inquest heard.

Clive Thomas, 52, the former managing director
of Anglia Recruitment Group, was reported dead by his wife Jan at their home in

Coddenham Road, Needham Market, in May last year after she found him lying at
the bottom of the stairs.

During an inquest held in Bury St Edmunds
yesterday, it emerged the businessman, who was also a past chairman of the
Suffolk branch of the Institute of Directors and raised tens of thousands of
pounds for a range of charities, had suffered “severe” depression after his firm
went into liquidation.

It was heard that two separate post mortem
examinations to determine the cause of death had proved
inconclusive.

Chief Inspector Nick Bennett said Mr Thomas had suffered a
“nasty injury” to the back of his head during the fall but this had not caused
his death.

He said during the police investigation it emerged Mr Thomas
had endured “quite a severe episode of stress” when his business went into
liquidation earlier in the year for which he was prescribed
medication.

Ch Insp Bennett told how toxicology tests revealed Mr Thomas,
who had an enlarged heart, had consumed alcohol prior to his death and would
have been “unsteady on his feet” at the time of fall.

He also said foul
play had been ruled out.

Greater Suffolk Coroner Dr Peter Dean attributed
cause of death to “postural asphyxiation”, which meant Mr Thomas was unable to
breathe because of the way he was lying at the foot of the stairs.

“We
are not exactly sure how the fall actually occurred,” he said before recording a
narrative verdict that Mr Thomas had died from consequences of a fall down the

stairs.

After the hearing, Mr Thomas’s widow Jan Thomas thanked the staff
at the coroner’s office for their support and help and told how the medication
her husband was taking before his death had made him “dozy”.

Mr Thomas’s mother Cathy Meadows added: “We still don’t know
what happened. There are lots of questions in my mind – but what can you do?”
she asked. “He did lots of things for charities. I am very proud of him. He was
such a good and kindly man and he was always trying to help other people. I
still really cannot believe he has gone. He was such a lovely son to me. I just
can’t believe it – it was such a shock. I just can’t get over this – he was my
only son.”

1,143 total views, 1 views today

JAMA: Mild to severe depression better treated with alternatives to medications

Last month, a team at the University of Pennsylvania found only patients
with very severe depression were measurably helped by antidepressant drugs. Mild
to severe depression might be better treated with alternatives to antidepressant
drugs, they wrote in the Journal of the American Medical Association.


From: nandtbearden@yahoo.com
To: ,
ssri-crusaders@yahoogroups.com, atypical_antipsychotics@yahoogroups.com,
atracyphd2@aol.com
Sent: 2/14/2010 8:12:09 A.M. Central Standard
Time
Subj: Even when treated, depression costs employers

http://uk.mobile.reuters.com/mobile/m/FullArticle/eUK/CHLTUK/nhealthNews_uUKTRE6183DO20100209

Even
when treated, depression costs employers
Tue, 09 Feb 20:05 PM
GMT

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Workers with depression stay home
sick more often than healthy colleagues, even when their disease is treated,
according to a Thomson Reuters report released on Tuesday.

The report,
commissioned by drug maker Sanofi Aventis, suggests that employers would
benefit from better treatments of their workers for depression. Depression is
the leading cause of disability among Americans aged 15 to 44, according to
the National Institute of Mental Health.

“Even when depressed patients
are treated with antidepressants, there are substantial productivity losses.
Therapies that can better manage depression may provide opportunities for
savings to employers,” the Thomson Reuters research team wrote in the Journal
of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

“Despite the widely
acknowledged effectiveness of antidepressant therapy, productivity costs
related to depression persist even after patients receive treatment,” Suellen
Curkendall, director of outcomes research at Thomson Reuters, said in a
statement.

“This may be due to the fact that patients often don’t
respond to the first type of antidepressant that they are prescribed. They
also may fail to take their medications on a regular basis,” added Curkendall,
who led the study.

Curkendall and colleagues analyzed insurance claims
and employee health and productivity data for more than 22,000 patients
treated with antidepressants and compared them to people without
depression.

Workers who had been treated for depression were twice as
likely as others to use short-term disability leave, they found.
Disability-related costs for a year, on average, were $1,038 for patients
treated for depression and $325 for the non-depressed workers.

“Over 40
percent of patients with depression were diagnosed with at least one of the
other included psychiatric conditions besides depression,” the researchers at
Thomson Reuters, parent company of Reuters, added.

Most common were
anxiety, dissociative and so-called somatoform disorders — a group of
disorders with physical symptoms but no apparent physical cause.

Last
month, a team at the University of Pennsylvania found only patients with very
severe depression were measurably helped by antidepressant drugs. Mild to
severe depression might be better treated with alternatives to antidepressant
drugs, they wrote in the Journal of the American Medical
Association.

At least 27 million Americans take antidepressants and
more than 164 million prescriptions for antidepressants were written in 2008,
totaling nearly $10 billion in U.S. sales and $20 billion globally, according
to IMS Health.

(Reporting by Maggie Fox, editing by Jackie
Frank)
Sent via BlackBerry by
AT&T

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ANTIDEPRESSANT WITHDRAWAL: Son Beats Mother: Drives Car into Abutment: CAN

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):
Withdrawal, especially abrupt withdrawal, from
antidepressants can cause severe neuropsychiatric and physical symptoms. It is
important to withdraw extremely slowly from these drugs, often over months
or years depending on length of use, under the supervision of a qualified
and experienced specialist, if available.

Withdrawal is often more severe than the
original symptoms or problems.
Refer to
CD on safe withdrawal for guidelines “Help! I Can‘t Get Off My

Antidepressant!”

Paragraph 11 reads:  “According to an agreed statement,
Roman’s father, Danny Osadca, told police that his son never had a good
relationship with his mother, suffers from severe depression and
doesn’t take his medication as prescribed.”

http://www.ottawacitizen.com/health/pleads+guilty+attacking+mother/2295992/story.html

Man, 28, pleads guilty to attacking his mother

Woman told police she feared for her life

By Andrew Seymour,
The Ottawa CitizenDecember 3, 2009

OTTAWA ­ The 28-year-old son of a
former high tech executive has pleaded guilty to assault causing bodily harm,
for grabbing his mother by the neck, smashing her head on the floor, covering
her nose and mouth to prevent her from breathing and throwing her down a flight
of stairs.

Roman Osadca admitted he was angry at his mother Elizabeth
Osadca on Oct. 7, 2008 after learning his ex-girlfriend had married. So he
charged toward his mother and tossed her on the floor, repeatedly punching and
shaking her head from side to side before placing both hands over her nose and
mouth.

When his mother ­ who described seeing stars and began losing
consciousness ­ fought back by kicking and punching him, he threw her down
the basement stairs.

According to an agreed statement of facts, Elizabeth
Osadca lay dazed at the bottom of the stairs for a few minutes before being able
to quietly climb the stairs and then run to a neighbour’s house to call
police.

Roman Osadca, who had already fled the home in a car, eventually
crashed into a light standard near the corner of Carling Avenue and Moodie
Drive. The light pole fell and hit another car.

Osadca ended up in the
same emergency ward at the Queensway-Carleton hospital as his mother, who had
suffered a cut to the back of her head, a bruised and swollen eye as well as a
red, swollen bump and small cigarette burn to her forehead.

Elizabeth
Osadca ­ who court heard Wednesday doesn’t want her son to go to jail ­
told police she was fearful for her life and believed that her son was going to
kill her.

Following his arrest, Osadca admitted attacking his mother,
telling police he “should have stopped after the first punch,” but never
intended to kill her.

The day of the attack, Roman Osadca had learned his
ex-girlfriend had married a man from the Dominican Republic. Osadca’s mother had
discovered the information and told the woman to tell her son about the new
relationship ­ and he blamed her for what happened.

Police went to
Elizabeth Osadca’s house afterward and found a large hole in the kitchen wall as
well as a knife planted in the wall of the stairs leading to the basement.

According to an agreed statement, Roman’s father, Danny Osadca, told
police that his son never had a good relationship with his mother, suffers from
severe depression and doesn’t take his medication as prescribed.

Danny
Osadca is the founder of the Osadca Group, a Nepean consulting group. He is also
a former chief executive of Med Eng Systems.

Calling the attack a “once
in a lifetime situation,” Roman Osadca’s lawyer Rod Sellar said his “extremely
remorseful” client ­ who apologized in court for his actions ­ is
receiving treatment for depression. Osadca, who has also pleaded guilty to
dangerous driving, should receive a conditional sentence, Sellar argued. But
assistant Crown attorney Shawn Eagles argued a six-month jail term was more
appropriate given the prolonged nature of the “vicious attack” and the “profound
breach of trust” in a child’s attacking his own mother.

Sentencing is set
for Dec. 7.
© Copyright (c) The Ottawa
Citizen

1,930 total views, 1 views today

ANTIDEPRESSANT: Speaker of the House in Georgia Legislature Attempts Suicide

Paragraph 7 reads:  “Sure, he had been under a doctor’s
care, taking medication, but apparently  ‘the black
dog,’ as Winston Churchill once called depression, started
howling so fiercely last Sunday that one of Georgia’s top legislators couldn’t
silence it. Those who suffer from depression are the first to know it is
hardly a simple disease.”

http://www.chattanoogan.com/articles/article_163177.asp

Roy Exum: A Suicide Is Foiled
by Roy Exum
posted November 15,
2009

Roy Exum
Glenn Richardson is the Speaker of

the House in the Georgia legislature. He has been elected to represent those in
the Dallas/Hiram part of the state seven straight times and, when he became

Speaker in 2003, he was the first Republican chosen since Reconstruction.
Earlier this year, he was unanimously chosen as the legislature’s leader for the
third straight time.

In short, he doesn’t fail at many things, but a week
ago he tried to commit suicide. Because of quick action by emergency teams in

Paulding County, his life was spared and, in a moving story that appeared in
Saturday’s Atlanta newspaper, he courageously admitted he fights severe
depression and will use the near-tragedy to better suicide prevention.

His was hardly a publicity stunt or a novel way of attracting
voters. He doesn’t need that. But the anguish in his coming forward, readily
admitting his human flaw, shows that if depression can lay its thick and
suffocating blanket on state legislator Glenn Richardson, it can be a very black
cloud over any of us.

“While depression often seems to be resolved on
occasion, when personal trials or tribulations arise, it flares back up,”
Richardson said in his public statement. “That is what occurred with me. My
depression became so severe that I took substantial steps to do harm to myself
and to take my own life. I am thankful that because of medical intervention I
have instead been able to now receive help and support.”

A couple of

years ago Richardson and his wife were divorced in a high-profile case of a
marriage that was “irretrievably broken.” The couple has three children and
apparently Glenn has never shaken the pain of the divorce. Anyone who has ever
gone through a divorce can understand that, most especially if grief-stricken
children are watching.

“I ask that the media use discernment if they
report this and remember my friends and family who are also hurting,” his
statement read. “I fully believe this has and will continue to push me to find
my best self and use my position of leadership to raise awareness and let others
know they are not alone. Thank you for your thoughts and prayers.”

Sure,
he had been under a doctor’s care, taking medication, but apparently “the black
dog,” as Winston Churchill once called depression, started howling so fiercely
last Sunday that one of Georgia’s top legislators couldn’t silence it. Those who
suffer from depression are the first to know it is hardly a simple
disease.

So instead of giving in to the problem and giving up his
standing in the Georgia House after Sunday night’s scare, Glenn is now going
“public,” urging others to “stay in the game” rather than commit what has been
called “life’s most selfish act” because suicide leaves so many living victims

in its wake.

Both Republicans and Democrats applauded his courage Friday.
Speaker Pro Tem Mark Burkhalter (R-Johns Creek), called Richardson a “brilliant
political leader and dear friend.”

“Most importantly, each of us is
praying for him and his family,” Burkhalter told newspaper reporters. “His
willingness to share this difficult experience clearly demonstrates his amazing
courage. Speaker Richardson is a true champion, and we in the House of

Representatives look forward to his continued leadership and
recovery.”

DuBose Porter (D-Dublin) is the House Minority leader and
added his “thoughts and prayers are with Glenn and his family. I am glad he
sought the help that he needed to. People need to know many people suffer from
depression and there is help that can be provided for that. I am thankful he got
the help he needed.”

So the lesson is not to point out how the strong
have fallen, but rather that those who suffer are not alone. There is help
available no matter where you are, who you are, or how insignificant the disease
might tend to make you feel you are.

The bottom line is that somebody
needs each of us. In the state of Georgia literally millions rely on Glen
Richardson’s wisdom and leadership. He’ll be the first to tell you today that no
matter how black the darkness may be, there is a way out of the maze of severe
depression if you’ll call on others to hold your hand until the professionals
who walk among us can cease its trembling.

Thank God that is what Glenn
Richardson did just last
Sunday.

royexum@aol.com

1,337 total views, 1 views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS: NICE Warns Against Various Antidepressant Uses: UK

First sentence reads: “GPs should not prescribe antidepressants routinely for long periods, or to treat mild depression, NICE has warned.”

http://www.healthcarerepublic.com/news/948602/NICE-warns-GPs-antidepressant-use/

Sanjay Tanday, healthcarerepublic.com,
28 October 2009, 00:15am
GPs should not prescribe antidepressants routinely for long periods, or to treat mild depression, NICE [National Institute for Clinical Excellence] has warned.

BMJ research reveals an increase in long-term antidepressant use across the UK

Updated guidance published this week says GPs should only consider the drugs for patients with moderate or severe depression, or those suffering sub-threshold depressive symptoms for at least two years.

The latest guidance comes as research in the BMJ reveals an increase in long-term antidepressant use across the UK.

The researchers assessed all cases of depression from 1993 to 2005 across 170 surgeries, covering 1.7 million patients.

They found that prescriptions per patient rose from 2.8 in 1993 to 5.6 in 2004, despite a drop in the number of patients diagnosed with depression.

The researchers said the rise may be due to more patients taking antidepressants on a long-term basis.

* Read the full version of this story in this week’s edition of GP dated 30 October

1,501 total views, 2 views today

Medications for Depression & OCD: Thanksgiving-Man Shoots & Kill 4 Relatives: FL

Paragraph six reads:  “Merhige’s troubled mental history
­ which included severe depression and
obsessive-compulsive disorder ­ dated back to a nervous breakdown
while he was an honors student at the University of Miami, said his mother,
Carole Merhige.”

Paragraph 15 reads:  “He
was supposed to be on medication when Thursday’s shooting happened, but
she said he had been self-medicating. She did not know whether he was doing so
correctly.”

http://www.palmbeachpost.com/news/crime/man-accused-of-killing-four-relatives-in-jupiter-91027.html

Man accused of killing four relatives in Jupiter had long history of
mental illness, threats against

By Andrew
Marra
and John
Lantigua

Palm Beach Post Staff WriterPalm Beach Post Staff
Writer
Updated: 4:55 p.m. Monday, Nov. 30, 2009

MIAMI ­ Paul
Michael Merhige, accused of killing four relatives at a Thanksgiving dinner in
Jupiter, had threatened to kill family members before and often refused to take
medication prescribed to treat his longtime mental illness, according to court
records and Merhige’s mother.

In April 2006, during a fight with his
sister at their parents’ house outside Miami, Merhige told the sister “I’m going
to slit your throat,” according to a domestic violence complaint filed by the
sister, Carla Merhige.

He added that “this time I’m not going to go by
myself,” referring to an earlier suicide attempt he had made, according to his
sister’s complaint.

Seeking a restraining order, Carla Merhige wrote that
her brother’s threat to slit her throat was just the latest of many that “occur
on a regular basis since (Merhige) suffers from mental illness but refuses to
take his medication.”

Carla was among the four people killed Thursday in
what police say was a murderous rampage by her 35-year-old brother at their
cousin’s Jupiter home. He is still on the loose and being hunted by law
enforcement officials.

Merhige’s troubled mental history ­ which
included severe depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder ­ dated back to
a nervous breakdown while he was an honors student at the University of Miami,
said his mother, Carole Merhige.

“Everything was perfect until he was
19,” she said in an interview today.

But since graduating, his mental
illness had barred him from holding down a job, and he had an often-violent
relationship with his family, one that his mother characterized as “16 years of
problems.”

Merhige appeared to have made preparations before Thursday’s
massacre, during which a witness recalled him saying: “I’ve been waiting 20
years to do this.”

Last month, Merhige bought at least two firearms, his
mother said, and last week he asked his parents for his passport, which they had
kept at their home in the Miami area.

Unable to hold down a job, he had
been financially supported by his parents since his mental troubles
began.

Those troubles culminated when gunshots flashed Thursday night at
his cousin’s home on Via Veracruz in Jupiter. Police say Merhige killed Carla
and her twin sister, Lisa Knight, both 33; his aunt, Raymonde Joseph, 76; and
his cousin’s 6-year-old daughter, Makayla Sitton.

A candlelight vigil is
planned for the twin sisters, Carla and Lisa, tonight in Miami.

In recent
years Paul Merhige had become more independent and was living by himself in an
apartment in the Coral Gables area, his mother said.

He was supposed to
be on medication when Thursday’s shooting happened, but she said he had been
self-medicating. She did not know whether he was doing so correctly.

She
said she hopes her son is captured soon, adding that she has no idea where he
is. When Paul Merhige asked his parents for his passport, she said, he didn’t
mention travel plans.

Most upsetting to her, Carole Merhige said, was the
ease with which he was able to purchase handguns.

“A person with a
history of mental problems should not be able to get a gun,” she said. “This is
such a big country. Why isn’t there a database of mentally ill
people?”

She and her husband, who lost two daughters to their troubled
son, do not plan to attend tonight’s vigil.

“We’re devastated,” she said.
“We’re just taking it day by day.”

1,442 total views, 1 views today