ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Mother Leaves Children Home Alone for 3 Days: Australia

Paragraph seven reads:  “Defence solicitor Travis George
said the woman was under extreme pressure at the time, was taking
antidepressants
and was struggling to cope with one of her
children’s unruly behaviour.”

SSRI Stories Note:  The Physicians
Desk Reference states that antidepressants can
cause a craving for alcohol and alcohol abuse.

Also, the liver cannot metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol
simultaneously,  thus leading to higher levels of both alcohol and the
antidepressant
in the human body.

http://www.frasercoastchronicle.com.au/story/2009/11/25/homealone-mum-walks-out-on-kids/

Home alone: Mum walks out on kids

Loretta Bryce |
25th November 2009

A STRESSED-OUT single mum who left her kids home
alone for three nights while she went on a binge has been ordered to perform 150
hours community service.

The 32-year-old Maryborough mother left her

children, aged 10, 11 and 14, to fend for themselves between October 21 and
October 24.

She appeared in the Maryborough Magistrates Court where she
pleaded guilty to leaving her children unsupervised for an unreasonable period
of time.

Prosecutor Sergeant Michael Quirk said the woman saw the kids
off to school on the 21st before heading out to a pub where she got
drunk.

The woman continued to drink excessively for the next three days,
staying at motels for two nights and at a friend’s home the other
night.

The children’s attempts to contact their mum were
unsuccessful.

Defence solicitor Travis George said the woman was under
extreme pressure at the time, was taking antidepressants and was struggling to
cope with one of her children’s unruly behaviour.

Mr George said she had
sought help from mental health services, her GP and the Department of Child
Safety in the fear she would have a breakdown but was not given the help she
needed.

“It all got too much on the morning of this offence,” Mr George
said.

“The children’s behaviour was out of control.

“My client
cracked and went on a bender.

“She drank to excess and came home to find
her children gone.”

Mr George said the Department of Child Safety had
since stepped in to help and the children were under alternative care until the
end of the month, when they would be returned to their mother.

The woman
had the support of her own mother and was not likely to re-offend, Mr George
said.

Magistrate John Smith sentenced the woman to 150 hours unpaid
community service and did not record a
conviction.

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Assault with Knife: England

Second paragraph from the end reads:  “He was
taking anti-depressants when he met his ex by accident in a
pub and began drinking heavily.”

SSRI Stories Note:  The Physicians
Desk Reference states that antidepressants can
cause a craving for alcohol and alcohol abuse.
Also, the liver cannot metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol
simultaneously,  thus leading to higher levels of both alcohol and the
antidepressant
in the human body.

http://www.eveshamjournal.co.uk/news/4757634.Heartbroken_man_stabbed_best_friend/

Heartbroken man stabbed best friend

5:09pm Tuesday
24th November 2009

#show Comments (0) Have your
say »

A HEARTBROKEN man stabbed his best friend in the stomach after
breaking up with his girlfriend.

John Withers had been homeless since
the split but was given shelter by Trevor Phillips, a former work colleague.

But Withers got drunk after an unexpected meeting with his ex-partner
and returned to Mr Phillips’ house in the village of Wickhamford, near Evesham,
in “a zombie state”, said Alex Warren, prosecuting.

He stuck the kitchen

knife four inches into Mr Phillips’ stomach in an unprovoked attack.

When police arrived, Withers was drinking a can of beer and the victim
still had the blade protruding from his body, Worcester Crown Court heard.

Withers, aged 44, of no fixed address, pleaded guilty to unlawful
wounding and was jailed for 27 months.

Judge Richard Rundell said an
inch or two either way and Withers could have been facing a murder charge.

He accepted a defence submission that the attack was “inexplicable” and
said Withers might have mental health issues.

Mr Phillips, who lived
with his wife and step daughter, had known the defendant for 15 years and took
pity on him when he became homeless at the end of his romance, said Mr Warren.

But on June 26 Withers was spoken to by Mr Phillips about being drunk
and an argument blew up.

Later that evening Withers returned to the
address. The victim was making coffee when he felt the knife blow.

The
blade did not enter the abdominal cavity and he recovered after an operation.

Francis Laird, defending, said Withers had gone through a stressful
break-up and was “totally heartbroken”.

He was taking anti-depressants
when he met his ex by accident in a pub and began drinking heavily.

Mr
Laird said: “He became overwhelmed and did something quite inexplicable. He is
deeply sorry for what he did. It may have been out of his control.”

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PROZAC: Suicide: Woman Set Herself on Fire: England

Paragraph nine reads:  “By this time she was also
taking Prozac
and diazepam and had been given
several referrals for alcohol treatment programmes.”

SSRI Stories
Note:  The Physicians Desk Reference states that antidepressants can cause a craving for alcohol and
alcohol abuse. Also, the liver cannot
metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol simultaneously,  thus leading
to higher levels of both alcohol and the antidepressant in the human
body.

http://www.theargus.co.uk/news/4749233.Brighton_mum_who_set_herself_on_fire_was_depressed_after_redundancy__inquest_hears/

Brighton mum who set herself on fire was depressed after redundancy,
inquest hears

2:33pm Thursday 19th November 2009

A Brighton mother-of-two committed suicide by dousing herself in barbecue lighter
fluid and setting it alight after battling with a chronic alcohol problem and
depression since being made redundant, an inquest heard today.

Birgit Bartlett’s body was found by her daughter in the garden of her home in
Hollingbury Crescent on August 8.

An inquest at Brighton County Court
heard the 51-year-old died of suffocation after inhaling the flames which
enveloped her body.

Pathologist Mark Taylor, who carried out a
post-mortem examination, said she had an acute thermal injury to her windpipe
and believed she would have died “rapidly”.

Mr Taylor said she had low
levels of alcohol in her blood, equal to having consumed around four units, but
added that he found excess fat around her liver, “in keeping with her history of
chronic alcohol abuse,” although this did not contribute to her death.

Mrs Bartlett’s husband, Michael, said his wife began drinking heavily
when she was made redundant in 2007 and he and his adult son and daughter would
often find empty bottles of wine hidden around the house.

In 2008 she
stopped drinking when she became employed as an admin assistant, but took it up
again when she lost the job in February of this year.

This time her
alcohol abuse was worse, and she took to drinking a bottle of spirits a day. Mr
Bartlett said the family confiscated her credit cards and cheque book in a bid
to stop her.

By this time she was also taking Prozac and diazepam and
had been given several referrals for alcohol treatment programmes.

During a visit to her GP in March she denied thoughts of suicide but
admitted she had been feeling low, before she was admitted to hospital in May
after setting fire to her duvet cover while in bed.

She suffered third
degree burns to her thigh and lower back and was referred to the local community
mental health team.

The inquest heard that German-born Mrs Bartlett had
no previous psychiatric problems but her sister had committed suicide six years
ago.

Psychiatrist Graham Walton said he saw Mrs Bartlett three times in
July but said he felt “she didn’t want to engage” with him.

He said he
did not think she seemed suicidal but “she did admit there was endless
drinking”.

Mr Bartlett said his wife underwent a detoxification
programme to try to stop her from drinking and said she felt “ashamed” of her
condition.

“She was petrified that somebody she knew would see her going
in or out,” he added.

In the days leading up to her death she told him,
“I’ll never find another job” and “I’m no good”, the inquest heard.

On

the day she died Mr Bartlett said he noticed she was missing so thought she
might have gone for a walk and he searched her local haunts. He arrived back at
the house at around 1.30pm to find police, fire engines and ambulances outside.

Detective Sergeant Helen Paine of Sussex
Police
told the inquest that officers were satisfied that there were no
suspicious circumstances surrounding Mrs Bartlett’s death.

Summing up,
Dr Karen Henderson, assistant deputy coroner for Brighton and Hove, said the
inquest had found “little evidence that she seriously wished to stop drinking”.

She added: “She was also offered a lot of help from social services, her
GP, and from substance misuse services. It is quite clear she did not wish to
engage with these services.

“The manner of her death is truly terrible
but we have heard evidence that her death would have been mercifully brief and
mercifully painless.”

Recording a verdict of suicide, she added: “I know
that the family did everything they possibly could to help Birgit,” and offered
them her condolences.

Mr Bartlett declined to comment on the hearing.

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Young Man Missing – Voices said “eat sugar”: Iowa

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):

How bright of this prescribing physician! You have someone who
is disoriented so you give them a drug that
causes “disorientation”! So why would anyone wonder why this
young man got worse and then disappeared into the freezing weather with no
shoes or coat?
It does appear clear to me that the
antidepressant affected his blood sugar rapidly and strongly with the
heart palpitations and the cravings for sugar – both symptoms of a drop in blood

sugar levels. The brain cannot function without normal sugar levels and
immediately begins losing brain cells when the sugar level drops. And the body
pumps adrenalin – the fight or flight hormone – in an attempt to normalize the
sugar levels when they drop.

_______________________________________
Paragraphs three & four read:
Moncada’s mother, Ana Moncada, said he went to work on
Thanksgiving night; and, when he returned home on the morning of Nov. 27, he
seemed disoriented. She took him to see a doctor, who prescribed an
anti-depressant. He continued to feel disoriented and began to hear voices, she
said.”

“ ‘He was hearing voices that saideat sugar,

said Maria Stockton, a friend who served as translator for his mother.  ‘He
felt his heart was beating too hard and thought if he ate sugar, his heart
would not beat so hard’.”

http://www.southwestiowanews.com/articles/2009/12/09/council_bluffs/doc4b1fd2bc0a96e293364639.txt

Bluffs man reported missing

By TIM JOHNSON, Staff Writer
tjohnson@nonpareilonline.com
Published: Wednesday, December 9, 2009 10:59 AM CST
A young
Hispanic man from Council Bluffs has been reported missing.

Larry Ely
Murillo Moncada, 25, was last seen Saturday, Nov. 28, at 6:15 p.m. at his
residence at 719 N. 14th St., according to his family. He was wearing a Navy
blue hooded sweatshirt and light blue seat pants. He was described as 5-feet,
5-inches tall and 140 pounds, with brown eyes.

Moncada’s mother, Ana
Moncada, said he went to work on Thanksgiving night; and, when he returned home
on the morning of Nov. 27, he seemed disoriented. She took him to see a doctor,
who prescribed an anti-depressant. He continued to feel disoriented and began to
hear voices, she said.

“He was hearing voices that saideat sugar,’”

said Maria Stockton, a friend who served as translator for his mother. “He felt
his heart was beating too hard and thought if he ate sugar, his heart would not
beat so hard.”

He did not eat very much sugar, she said, but by Saturday,
he was hallucinating.

“He said somebody was following him, and he was
scared,” she said.

It was apparently this fear that led Murillo Moncada
to run out the door that evening without any shoes on, Stockton said.

The
family has checked with acquaintances and posted flyers at businesses they
frequent, but have heard nothing so far.

Anyone with information on his
whereabouts should contact Detective Shawn Landon of the Council Bluffs Police
Department at (712) 326-2508 or Crime Stoppers at (712)
328-STOP.

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ZOLOFT: 12 Year Old Boy Kills 5 Week Old Infant: Georgia

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy:

I could not even begin to count the number of times that a
child on Zoloft has told me of both thoughts and plans to kill that they
developed on Zoloft. Eric Harris, the lead shooter at Columbine, had those
thoughts within three weeks on Zoloft and found them to be so disturbing to him
that he reported it and they took him off Zoloft and put him on another
antidepressant. [What is the definition of insanity? Doing the same thing and
expecting a different result – the other antidepressant, Luvox, ended up
producing thoughts of killing intense enough to result in the largest school
shooting the world had ever witnessed at that point.] I even had a case of a 5

year old boy in Southern Utah who had such intense feelings of homicide that he
told his family he was going to have the police come and kill them
all.

Check out our database of cases at www.ssristories.drugawareness.org to find more cases
like this of children killing while under the influence of
antidepressants.
Paragraph 29 reads:  “While the boy continued to refuse,
Curtis spoke to police when he was out of the room. She told them the boy was in
counseling, that he had been fighting at school, that he had been prescribed

Zoloft and a mood stabilizing medicine. Then, Curtis provided a tearful account
of what he said happened.”

http://www.tampabay.com/news/courts/criminal/infants-mother-testifies-as-tampa-boy-stands-trial-in-georgia-murder/1057496

Infant‘s mother testifies as Tampa boy stands trial in Georgia

death

By Alexandra
Zayas
, Times Staff Writer
In Print: Thursday,
December 10, 2009

MARIETTA, Ga. ­ On the Fourth of July, Brittiany
Young returned to her car in a Target parking lot and put it in reverse. That’s
when she noticed the swollen mouth of her 5weekold daughter,
Millan.

Young put the car in park and turned to her cousin, a 12yearold

Tampa boy she had left alone with the baby.

“What did you do?” she asked.
“What did you do to her?”

The mother testified Wednesday morning in a
Cobb County, Ga., courtroom, where the Tampa boy faces charges of felony murder
and cruelty to children. He has pleaded not guilty. Juvenile Court Judge A.
Gregory Poole will decide the case without a jury.

The unidentified boy
­ a court order keeps his name secret ­ was visiting relatives July 4
outside Atlanta when his cousin stopped at the Target to pick up food for a
picnic. According to court testimony, the 22-yearold mother left the keys in
the ignition and the air conditioning on as she shopped at the store for 18
minutes. When Young returned, the boy was playing on his cell phone in the back
seat. The radio was turned louder. And the infant was not responsive.

The
baby girl was taken off life support the next day. A medical examiner found
multiple skull fractures and ruled the cause of death blunt force trauma to the
head.

The boy has remained in Georgia since July, first locked up in a
juvenile detention center, then transferred to a secure group
home.

Authorities said nothing specific about how they think the baby
died until Wednesday morning.

“Something so horrific happened that
pictures don’t do it justice,” prosecutor Eleanor Odom said in her opening
statement. “That child’s head was bashed in.”

The boy‘s attorney, Derek
Wright, had another word to describe the prosecution’s case:
“Impossible.”

He said prosecutors would not be able to provide a scenario
showing exactly what act of violence befell the baby ­ no weapon, no points
of impact in the car.

By Wednesday night, they still had not.

• •

In the courtroom, the sixth-grader wore a gold suit ­ like the one
he wore to his elementary school graduation.

When his mother, his father
and his great-aunt cried ­ when the baby’s mother cried ­ he remained
composed.

But emergency responders who first arrived at the scene
testified that they saw him pacing and sobbing. They noted a different, more
calm reaction from the mother. Paramedic Pierce Summers saw her later at the
hospital.

“For someone that had had a child in that circumstance, it was
surprising,” he said, “like she was kind of lost in a fog.”

Young
described what her baby looked like in the car: eyes swollen and hard to the
touch; blood on her mouth or nose; limp.

On July 5, the baby girl was
deemed brain dead and taken off life support. The prosecutor asked the mother,
“Were you there when Millan died?”

She paused to wipe tears. Then, she
said, “yes.”

After the judge ordered a break and the infant‘s mother left
the stand, the boy burst into tears. He stood up, turned around and looked at
his mother, who stood up from a bench and kissed his forehead.

• •

For much of the day and into the night, the prosecution focused on
three videotaped interviews the boy gave detectives.

The third was the
subject of an hourslong debate. The defense fought hard to have it suppressed,
saying the boy was forced to give incriminating statements.

During the
first, the boy told detectives what he told the baby’s mother: The baby began to
cry, so he tried to give her a pacifier. She spit it out, so he tried to give
her a bottle of water. She kept screaming, and was scratching her face. He
turned the radio loud, and it appeared she went to sleep.

The boy‘s story
didn’t stray far from his original account in his second interview, which he
gave the day after the baby was pronounced dead.

“If you accidentally
hurt Millan, would you tell us?” the detective asked.

“Yes,” the boy

said. “I didn’t accidentally hurt her. . . . I don’t want to hurt a
baby.”

But a couple of hours after he gave that interview ­ while
their entire family was gathered at the baby’s mother’s house ­ the boy‘s
mother, Camille Curtis, brought him back to speak with police. This time, she
was crying. She said he had told her something.

“It was just an
accident,” Curtis said. “He said he was scared. I asked him. He told me. He
thought I was going to be mad.”

Detectives asked the boy if he wanted to
talk. The boy shook his head.

While the boy continued to refuse, Curtis
spoke to police when he was out of the room. She told them the boy was in
counseling, that he had been fighting at school, that he had been prescribed

Zoloft and a mood stabilizing medicine. Then, Curtis provided a tearful account
of what he said happened.

She said he told her the baby started choking
when he tried to give her the bottle. He lifted her to his chest to burp her,
and she fell out of his hands.

The boy told the baby’s mother he was
sorry, Curtis said.

At that point in the videotape, the police told her
that this story didn’t match the injuries. The video shows her pleading with her
son to tell the police the truth, that he wouldn’t be allowed to go home until
he did.

He tells her he wiped the baby’s blood with a blanket, and that
he accidentally hit her with his elbow while trying to pick her up off the
floor.

Just before midnight on the videotape, when it appeared the boy
was about to talk, the judge stopped the tape.

“I find this to be
inherently unfair,” the judge said. “This child is so scared . . . literally in
a corner. His mother is pressuring him. How many times does the kid say he
doesn’t want to talk?”

With that, the judge struck the entire third
interview from the record. None of it will factor into the decision he will make
this week.

The trial continues today.

Alexandra Zayas can be
reached at azayas@sptimes.com or (813) 310-2081.

[Last modified: Dec
09, 2009 11:29 PM]

________________________________________

Judge’s
Verdict: Guilty, but not of murder

Dressed in a shirt and tie, the skinny, dimpled boy stayed calm as the
judge delivered his verdict: “I find beyond a reasonable doubt that Millan
suffered major trauma during the 18 minutes the juvenile was alone with the
baby. … I find that the juvenile caused the injuries and that the baby later
died as a result of the trauma.

“Now, what do I think happened? This child was left alone with the baby.
I don’t know that should have happened, but it did …

“Millan, a child he really didn’t know, started crying, and it got louder

“He didn’t know what to do. I think he was scared. He tried using the
pacifier to make this baby stop crying. It didn’t work. What did he do
next?

“He got out the bottle of water … He gives it to the baby. The baby won’t
be quiet. Turns up the radio so he won’t have to hear this baby crying. That
didn’t work. He might have even turned it up again. Well, the pink pacifier
didn’t work. Let’s use the purple pacifier …

“This juvenile was trying to get the baby to quit crying. … He was
scared, and he didn’t know what to do. … I wouldn’t expect him to know what to
do.

“I find that in order to get the baby to be quiet, using his own means as
a 12yearold, that he committed batteries, plural, against this baby

“Did this child mean that his actions would kill Millan? No …

“Technically, I think I can find possibly if I wanted to go further, some
type of an involuntary manslaughter. In my mind, I’ve still got to place this
child with some expectation, some appreciation for the horrific damage that it
has done, and I find nothing along those lines.

“Did he do wrong? Oh yeah, he did. I wish it hadn’t happened, but it
did.”

Tampa
boy, 12, found not guilty of murder in infant‘s death

By Alexandra Zayas,
Times Staff Writer
In Print:
Saturday, December 12, 2009

MARIETTA,
Ga. — The 12yearold Tampa boy sat in the Cobb County Juvenile Courthouse
Friday morning, still an accused baby murderer. A few hours later, he chomped on
potato chips and Skittles and asked to go to the all-you-can-eat buffet at
Golden Corral. He told his family he had plans for his future.

“I want to
be a judge,” he said. “I want to go to Harvard.”

This
announcement came after one made by Judge A. Gregory Poole: The boy was not
guilty of murder and child cruelty in the July death of his 5weekold cousin,
Millan
Young. He was guilty of a lesser offense, two counts of battery, which could
carry a two-year sentence, served either in a detention center, a group home, or
as probation while living with family. The sentence will come with
counseling.

The judge
will decide it on Jan. 6.

Had the boy
been convicted of murder, he would have faced nine years in detention.

As they
prepared to leave the courthouse, the boy‘s grandmother wrapped him in a tight
hug and told him, “See how God delivered you?”

He
responded, “Yes, ma’am.”

• • •

For three
days, lawyers tried to convince a judge of what they thought happened inside a
parked car on July 4.

The boy, his
name kept secret by court order, was visiting relatives near Atlanta when he got
into a car with his mother’s 22-yearold first cousin Brittiany Young and her
infant daughter. Young stopped at Target to get food and left the car
running.

When she
returned, she testified, the boy was playing on his cell phone. The radio was
turned up. And the baby’s mouth was swollen. Her lips were blue. Her eyes were
hard to the touch. She was limp and not breathing. The baby died the following
day.

Three
doctors testified about the child’s injuries: two types of brain hemorrhages,
retinal hemorrhages, unrelated fractures on opposite sides of her head, and
bruising of the mouth and other parts of her body. Tissue on her upper lip was
bruised, something that happens when babies are force-fed.

They said
the injuries weren’t accidental but couldn’t determine who caused them. The
medical examiner called it a homicide, finding that the child must have been
held firmly, shaken and slammed at least twice against a hard, flat surface.

Crime lab
tests found no physical evidence in the car. Prosecutors had testimony that the
baby was acting normally before the mother left the car and was unresponsive
when she returned.

In closing
statements Friday, defense attorney Derek Wright tried to convince the judge
that prosecutors didn’t prove the boy was the murderer. He said he could make a
case against the baby’s mother, noting that several emergency responders said
Young was acting unusually calm when they arrived, but that the boy was sobbing
and pacing. He suggested the possibility that the baby was injured at the
mother’s home minutes away but didn’t show signs of trauma until the parking
lot.

The baby’s
mother sat in the courtroom on a bench closest to the door. She stared ahead
with tears in her eyes as Wright said she could have let her cousin take the
blame.

Prosecutor
Eleanor Odom argued that the baby’s mother didn’t appear distraught because she
didn’t yet know the extent of the baby’s injuries, but that the boy already
did.

Odom took a
blood-stained, pink onesie out of an evidence bag and showed it to the
judge.

“You can see
the size, how big Millan really was,” Odom said. “I think this speaks more words
than those pictures ever could.”

Dressed in a
shirt and tie, the skinny, dimpled boy stayed calm as the judge delivered his
verdict: “I find beyond a reasonable doubt that Millan suffered major trauma
during the 18 minutes the juvenile was alone with the baby. … I find that the
juvenile caused the injuries and that the baby later died as a result of the
trauma.

“Now, what
do I think happened? This child was left alone with the baby. I don’t know that
should have happened, but it did …

“Millan, a
child he really didn’t know, started crying, and it got louder …

“He didn’t
know what to do. I think he was scared. He tried using the pacifier to make this
baby stop crying. It didn’t work. What did he do next?

“He got out
the bottle of water … He gives it to the baby. The baby won’t be quiet. Turns up
the radio so he won’t have to hear this baby crying. That didn’t work. He might
have even turned it up again. Well, the pink pacifier didn’t work. Let’s use the
purple pacifier …

“This
juvenile was trying to get the baby to quit crying. … He was scared, and he
didn’t know what to do. … I wouldn’t expect him to know what to do.

“I find that
in order to get the baby to be quiet, using his own means as a 12yearold, that
he committed batteries, plural, against this baby …

“Did this
child mean that his actions would kill Millan? No …

“Technically, I
think I can find possibly if I wanted to go further, some type of an involuntary
manslaughter. In my mind, I’ve still got to place this child with some
expectation, some appreciation for the horrific damage that it has done, and I
find nothing along those lines.

“Did he do
wrong? Oh yeah, he did. I wish it hadn’t happened, but it did.”

Once the
judge stopped talking, the boy started to cry. His parents embraced him, also in
tears. His mother smiled.

The baby’s
mother left the courtroom after the verdict and declined to comment. The boy‘s
grandmother said the family planned to gather at Brittiany Young’s home later
that day.

The judge
needed to decide where the boy would stay until the sentencing. He was
originally locked up in a juvenile detention center, but later transferred to a
secured group home.

A
representative from the group home told the judge the boy had a tough transition
into his school and, due to the stresses of his case, sometimes shut down
emotionally. But he said the boy was a role model and standout student.

The judge
allowed him to return to the group home and said he was welcome to visit with
family. He told the boy his behavior in the next month will be important in
deciding a sentence. The boy promised to be good.

Then, the
boy‘s attorney told the family, “Y’all go breathe.”

• • •

The boy‘s
grandmother, Joyce Hightower, couldn’t sleep Thursday night. She’d driven from
Tampa earlier that day and spent the night reading news about the case and
praying.

Now, holding
her grandson’s hand, she asked him how he felt.

“Good,” he
told her. “Anxious.”

“Anxious for
what?” she asked.

He said, “To
go home.”

Alexandra
Zayas can be reached at azayas@sptimes.com or (813)
310-2081.

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ANTIDEPRESSANT: Amnesia & Murder: Man Stabs Wife to Death: Nebraska

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy:

Serious memory loss is a common complaint as far as side
effects to antidepressants go. Even Amnesia is listed as a Frequent side effect
for Prozac in the Physicians Desk Reference.  It is no uncommon to be
unaware of what one has done on these drugs.
Also paranoia is listed as an “Infrequent” side-effect
[but not listed as Rare] in the Physicians Desk Reference for medications for
depression.  A person with paranoia should almost never be given an
antidepressant.
_____________________________
Paragraphs 12 through 16 read:  “The report says
Hollister began experiencing  ‘depressive symptoms,’ including
severe insomnia, in the summer of 2008. Financial stress, health problems and a
relative’s purported involvement with a cult contributed to his depression, the
report says.”

“Hollister reportedly became paranoid about others, whom
he believed were ‘plotting’ against him
,” the report says.  ‘He also
experienced suicidal ideation during that time period’.”

“Hollister
sought help from several medical professionals and was
prescribed medicine for depression and
insomnia.”

“On Nov. 3, Hollister called 911, saying his wife was
dead and a knife was beside her.”


http://www.omaha.com/article/20091031/NEWS01/710319900/-1/FRONTPAGE

Published Saturday October 31,
2009

Man competent for trial in wife’s death

By Todd Cooper
WORLD-HERALD STAFF WRITER

His mental
state now stabilized through medication, Robert T. Hollister has been ruled
competent to stand trial in the stabbing death of his wife, Jeanie “Ellie”
Hollister.

What doctors haven’t determined is whether the Omaha man was
sane at the time of his wife’s death on Nov. 3, 2008.

In a recent court
document, Lincoln Regional Center doctors said they needed more time to make
that determination. Hollister has pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity to

first-degree murder.

“Mr. Hollister is competent to stand trial,” the
regional center report says. “Further evaluation is necessary before an opinion
can be offered regarding Mr. Hollister’s mental status at the time of the
offense.”

Douglas County Attorney Don Kleine acknowledged the rarity of
regional center doctors requesting more time for evaluation because they haven’t
reached a consensus regarding a defendant’s mental state at the time of a
crime.

He said a defendant isn’t necessarily insane just because he has
been battling mental illness. However, he said, attorneys will have to wait for
the further evaluation before deciding how to proceed.

With insanity
defenses, the burden shifts to defense attorneys to prove that their client was
insane at the time of the killing. It will be up to Douglas County District
Judge Marlon Polk to weigh any testimony about Hollister’s mental
state.

If the judge concludes that Hollister was insane, he most likely
would be committed indefinitely to the regional center. If the judge determines
that Hollister was sane, he would proceed to trial and, if convicted, face life
in prison.

The initial regional center report by psychiatrist Klaus
Hartmann and psychologist Mario Scalora shows that Hollister, 59, had been
battling depression for several months before the death of his

wife.

Hollister, who has no criminal record, has a master’s degree in
human resources and was employed at Omaha Bedding Co. from 1994 to
2007.

He then worked at his wife’s vintage clothing store, “Weird Wild
Stuff,” from 2007 until the time of her death.

The report says Hollister
began experiencing “depressive symptoms,” including severe insomnia, in the
summer of 2008. Financial stress, health problems and a relative’s purported
involvement with a cult contributed to his depression, the report
says.

“Hollister reportedly became paranoid about others, whom he
believed were ‘plotting’ against him,” the report says. “He also experienced
suicidal ideation during that time period.”

Hollister sought help from
several medical professionals and was prescribed medicine for depression and
insomnia.

On Nov. 3, Hollister called 911, saying his wife was dead and a
knife was beside her.

Police found Ellie Hollister dead in the couple’s
home at 4705 N. 111th Circle.

Detectives found evidence that Ellie
Hollister, 52, tried to fight off her husband, including scratch marks on Robert
Hollister’s face. Hollister told regional center doctors he had “memory lapses
related to the alleged offense.”

“Hollister demonstrated a desire for
justice,” the report says, “rather than undeserved punishment.”

Contact
the writer:

444-1275,

todd.cooper@owh.com

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Sex Abuse: Woman (32) Has Affair with 14 Year Old Boy: PA

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy:

Finally someone involved in one of these cases is beginning to
connect the dots back to medication. She thought it was the anti-anxiety drugs
without knowing that it is rare for one of these cases not to involve an
antidepressant, not an anti-anxiety med, even though they would certainly
contribute as well. But antidepressants are notorious for producing
toxic manic reactions. One of those types of mania is
nymphomania.
TWO ANTIDEPRESSANTS given together???!!!! When are doctors
ever going to learn that they cannot do that without expecting toxic
reactions?!
_____________________________
Paragraph two reads:  “Tammy Lynn Woodley, 33, of 228
Park St., Grove City, told Common Pleas Judge John C. Reed that a Grove
City psychiatrist
had prescribed her four separate anti-anxiety
medications
and two anti-depressants, all of which she
was to take daily.”

Paragraph 5 reads:  “Defense attorney Veronica
Smith said prior to Mrs. Woodley’s alleged over-medication, she had no prior record. She led a normal life as a wife, mother,
and worker.”

Published October 28, 2009 10:01 pm –

UPDATE: Woman blames drugs for sex with

boy

By Matt Snyder
Herald Staff Writer

PINE TOWNSHIP ­

A former Pine Township woman facing felony
charges for having sex with a boy while he was 14 and she was 32 blamed her
actions on judgment clouded by taking multiple anti-anxiety
medications.

Tammy Lynn Woodley, 33, of 228 Park St., Grove City, told
Common Pleas Judge John C. Reed that a Grove City psychiatrist had prescribed
her four separate anti-anxiety medications and two anti-depressants, all of
which she was to take daily.

“So, essentially the main responsibility for
this is the medication, not you?” asked a somewhat incredulous Miles K. Karson
Jr., assistant district attorney.

“Essentially, yes,” Woodley replied.
She said she does not think she ever would have slept with the boy or been
involved in other petty criminal cases if not for the meds. “My mind was not
clear,” she said.

Defense attorney Veronica Smith said prior to Mrs.
Woodley’s alleged over-medication, she had no prior record. She led a normal
life as a wife, mother, and worker.

Reed sentenced Ms. Woodley to 6 to 12
months, just under the standard range for statutory sexual assault and unlawful
contact with a minor. She will be paroled after six months, he said, if she
behaves herself in Mercer County Jail.

Mrs. Woodley will also be on
probation for 16 years and must register as a Megan’s Law sex

offender.

According to police, Mrs. Woodley and the boy, who is now 15,
knew each other through a relative. She started picking him up after school in
September of 2008, and went for rides or walks in the park. Her husband once
said the two acted like “two teenagers in love.”

Mrs. Woodley said things
got out of hand Oct. 27, 2008, and she had sex with the boy against her better
judgment.

“After it was all done, remorse set in and I realized what had
just happened. After that I took him home,” she said.

The boy’s father
told police the next day that Mrs. Woodley had seduced his son. Both parents
attended Mrs. Woodley’s sentencing. They did not speak, but Karson said they
wanted to show their continued desire for a prosecution.

The boy told
police he and Mrs. Woodley kissed and talked about getting serious, but both
acknowledged their age difference.

After charges were filed, Mrs. Woodley
sent a letter to the boy while he was on the school bus through her 8-yearold

son. Charges of intimidating witnesses and corruption of minors were dropped in
that case as part of her plea.

Mrs. Woodley said she had sent the letter
because she wanted to know how he was doing. She said she’d sent him letters
through her son in the past.

As part of her probation, Mrs. Woodley will
not be allowed contact with underage children besides her own, unless a
responsible adult is present to supervise.

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: NICE Warns Against Various Antidepressant Uses: UK

First sentence reads: “GPs should not prescribe antidepressants routinely for long periods, or to treat mild depression, NICE has warned.”

http://www.healthcarerepublic.com/news/948602/NICE-warns-GPs-antidepressant-use/

Sanjay Tanday, healthcarerepublic.com,
28 October 2009, 00:15am
GPs should not prescribe antidepressants routinely for long periods, or to treat mild depression, NICE [National Institute for Clinical Excellence] has warned.

BMJ research reveals an increase in long-term antidepressant use across the UK

Updated guidance published this week says GPs should only consider the drugs for patients with moderate or severe depression, or those suffering sub-threshold depressive symptoms for at least two years.

The latest guidance comes as research in the BMJ reveals an increase in long-term antidepressant use across the UK.

The researchers assessed all cases of depression from 1993 to 2005 across 170 surgeries, covering 1.7 million patients.

They found that prescriptions per patient rose from 2.8 in 1993 to 5.6 in 2004, despite a drop in the number of patients diagnosed with depression.

The researchers said the rise may be due to more patients taking antidepressants on a long-term basis.

* Read the full version of this story in this week’s edition of GP dated 30 October

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS & ALCOHOL: Charges for Shoplifting: England

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy:

Applicable to this case and so many others is the fact that
the Physicians Desk Reference states that antidepressants can cause a craving for alcohol and
alcohol abuse. The liver cannot metabolize the
antidepressant and the alcohol simultaneously,  which leads to elevated
levels of both alcohol and the antidepressant
in the human body resulting in
toxic reactions.
Keep in mind that antidepressants are notorious for producing
toxic manic reactions. Two types of mania seem apparent in this case:
Dypsomania – an overwhelming craving for alcohol & Kleptomania – compulsion
to take things that are not yours.
Paragraph eleven reads:  “He suffers from
depression and is taking medication for it and on
this day he took medication and had a couple of beers and he can’t
account for why he did it.”


http://www.nwemail.co.uk/news/asda_shoplifter_was_in_severe_financial_straits_1_628597?referrerPath=news/

Asda shoplifter was in ‘severe financial straits’

Published at 13:10, Monday, 26 October 2009

A MAN tried
to flee a supermarket with £270-worth of goods and only enough cash for a taxi
home, a court heard.

Paul Richard Charnley stole the items from the Asda
store in Barrow.

But the 40-year-old was caught.

On Thursday,
Charnley appeared at Furness Magistrates’ Court over the theft.

Mr Andrew
Dodd, prosecuting, told the court: “He went into the store and went round
looking at various items, filling his trolley with various goods.

“Once
it is full, he goes into the cafe area where there is no CCTV coverage and is
observed placing items into carrier bags and into the top of the trolley and
then proceeds to leave without any intention of paying for any goods.”

Mr
Dodd said Charnley was followed by store staff and detained outside.

The
court heard Charnley was in “severe financial straits” and had been out of work

for 15 months.

He was said to be “hungry” and only had £5 on him that he
intended to use to pay for a taxi back to his home in Laburnum Crescent, Barrow.

Miss Karen Templeton, defending, told the court: “He says he is
absolutely ashamed of himself and he has been worried sick about coming here.

“He suffers from depression and is taking medication for it and on this
day he took medication and had a couple of beers and he can’t account for why he
did it.

“He takes this very seriously and is very remorseful about what
he has done.”

Charnley pleaded guilty to stealing items valued at £270.44
belonging to Asda on October 7.

Presiding magistrate Mr Les Johnson gave
Charnley a six-month conditional discharge.

Mr Johnson did not force
Charnley to pay a fine due to his money problems.

Published by http://www.nwemail.co.uk

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Alcohol Cravings & Assault Lead to Fatal Heart Attack: TN

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy:

Applicable to this case and so many others is the fact that
the Physicians Desk Reference states that antidepressants can cause a craving for alcohol and
alcohol abuse. The liver cannot metabolize the
antidepressant and the alcohol simultaneously,  which leads to elevated
levels of both alcohol and the antidepressant
in the human body resulting in
toxic behavioral reactions.
________________________________
Paragraphs five and six read:  “The official cause of
death for Oteri was listed as a heart attack, not the knife cut on his wrist
inflicted by Fagan, and the publisher’s family members maintained
they did not want Fagan to be prosecuted.

Fagan, who
was high on antidepressants and tequila the night of the fight,

was arrested for driving under the influence of alcohol shortly
afterward. He later pleaded guilty and spent time in a rehabilitation
treatment center

.

SSRI Stories Note:  The Physicians Desk Reference states
that antidepressants can cause a craving for
alcohol and alcohol abuse. Also, the liver
cannot metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol simultaneously,  thus
leading to higher levels of both alcohol and the antidepressant in the
human body.

http://www.upi.com/Entertainment_News/Music/2009/10/25/Songwriter-Fagan-remembers-lost-friend/UPI-64901256488994/

Songwriter Fagan remembers lost friend

Published: Oct. 25, 2009 at 12:43 PM
Order
reprints

NASHVILLE, Oct. 25 (UPI) — U.S. country songwriter Rich
Fagan says he wants his life to honor his publisher-friend Tom Oteri who died of
a heart attack after Fagan cut him
with a knife.

The (Nashville) Tennessean reported Sunday while Fagan did
not face prosecution for Oteri’s death on April 26, 2008, the songwriter holds
himself responsible.

“Part of me died that night, too, but it wasn’t the
good part,” Fagan told The Tennessean during an interview in Nashville. “If I’m
here for a reason, it’s to carry on Tom’s legacy.”

Fagan has written a
string of top hits recorded by country music stars, including “Americana,”
“Sold (The Grundy County Auction Incident),” “Be My Baby Tonight” and “I Miss
You a Little.”

The official cause of death for Oteri was listed as a

heart attack, not the knife cut on his wrist inflicted by Fagan, and the
publisher’s family members maintained they did not want Fagan to be
prosecuted.

Fagan, who was high on antidepressants and tequila the night
of the fight, was arrested for driving under the influence of alcohol shortly
afterward. He later pleaded guilty and spent time in a rehabilitation treatment center.

“The last
drink I had was that evening,” Fagan told The Tennessean. “I haven’t had one
since, and haven’t had the obsession to have
one.”

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