EFFEXOR: Man Smashes 29 TV Sets at Wal-Mart: Georgia

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):

Just what is it with connection between antidepressant use and
baseball bats?!! Must be the same as it is for antidepressants and AK47’s!
Doctors could have a side business selling both baseball bats and AK47’s with
the prescriptions they write for these drugs because as the users begin to
suffer the adverse reactions they buy one or the other or both! Has anyone
caught on yet? How many more cases will it take?
On another note WHY on earth are they charging this fellow in
one crime with 29 counts of criminal damage to property???? A charge for each of
the TV sets separately when it was one crime?! That is
ridiculous!!!
_____________________________________
Last sentence reads:  “Police found a bottle of
Effexor XR, an anti-depressant
, in Strellis’s
possession.”

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/02/11/westley-strellis-walmart_n_458652.html

Westley Strellis, Business
News

A Georgia man went on a rampage yesterday

at a Walmart outside of Atlanta, smashing dozens of flat-screen televisions with
a baseball bat he found in the store.

The man, 23-year-old Westley
Strellis, bashed in 29 flat-screen televisions worth $22,000, reports the

Atlanta Journal Constitution. He was charged
with a whopping 29 counts of criminal damage to property.

Strellis
invoked his Fifth Amendment right to stay mum, so his motive remains a mystery.
According to

the police
report
, when officers arrived on the scene, Strellis was
sitting in an aisle in the store’s electronics department. When approached, he
held out his wrists, signaling for the officer to handcuff him. Police found a
bottle of Effexor XR, an anti-depressant, in Strellis’s
possession.

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Effexor: Insomnia & Night Sweats + Withdrawal & Brain Zaps: Peoples Pharmacy

Paragraph two reads:  “After cutting my dose in
half,
I have had brain zaps (impossible to explain) and
pressure in my ears.”

http://www2.timesdispatch.com/rtd/lifestyles/local_other/article/S-PHAR06_20090902-190006/290023/

Q:I have been taking Effexor XR for two
years. At first I was pleased that it relieved the anxiety, depression and
excessive worrying I had been suffering. Then I began experiencing insomnia and

night sweats and decided to taper off this antidepressant.

After cutting
my dose in half, I have had brain zaps (impossible to explain) and pressure in
my ears.

Answer: Many people find that antidepressants such as Effexor
(venlafaxine), Cymbalta (duloxetine), Lexapro (escitalopram), Paxil (paroxetine)
and Zoloft (sertraline) are helpful for depression. But there can be a dark
side.

Stopping this type of drug can lead to withdrawal symptoms such as
dizziness, headaches, insomnia, anxiety, sweating, visual disturbances and
difficulty concentrating. Many people complain of shocklike sensations in their
head (brainzaps” or “shivers”).

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Effexor/SSRI Withdrawal: Brain Zaps: Peoples Pharmacy

Paragraph two reads:  “After cutting my dose in half, I have had brain zaps (impossible to explain) and pressure in my ears.”

http://www2.timesdispatch.com/rtd/lifestyles/local_other/article/S-PHAR06_20090902-190006/290023/

Q:I have been taking Effexor XR for two years. At first I was pleased that it relieved the anxiety, depression and excessive worrying I had been suffering. Then I began experiencing insomnia and night sweats and decided to taper off this antidepressant.

After cutting my dose in half, I have had brain zaps (impossible to explain) and pressure in my ears.

Answer: Many people find that antidepressants such as Effexor (venlafaxine), Cymbalta (duloxetine), Lexapro (escitalopram), Paxil (paroxetine) and Zoloft (sertraline) are helpful for depression. But there can be a dark side.

Stopping this type of drug can lead to withdrawal symptoms such as dizziness, headaches, insomnia, anxiety, sweating, visual disturbances and difficulty concentrating. Many people complain of shocklike sensations in their head (brainzaps” or “shivers”).

588 total views, 3 views today

Victim of Adderal Abuse

“My story just proves how ignorant psychiatrists are.”

I have been on a few different anti-depressants in the past two years. I started abusing drugs, mainly Adderal, exactly 2 years ago. This led to me getting “depression”. My mom took me to 3 different psychiatrists. The first one put me on Celexa. For a week all I could do was lay on the couch staring outside with tears in my eyes. We went back and they tried me on Effexor XR. It seemed to work, so they continually increased the dose. The doctor was even convinced I had ADHD and gave me a prescription to Adderal, my drug of choice. Eventually we changed psychiatrists. The Effexor was not working anymore, and he decided to try me on Paxil. I was on a high dose of Effexor which he told me to immediately stop taking, and to start taking Paxil the next day.

This naturally sounds like a bad idea, but I listened to him. I experienced what seemed to be an electric storm going on throughout my body. Every time I moved my eyes I would get this shocking pulse from my head down and everything would go blurry for a fraction of a second. Eventually these all went away. It took approximately a month. A year went by where the only thing that seemed to help me was my addiction to abusing drugs.

Hid this well from my parents, and they AND the doctor believed the Paxil was helping. Well a few months ago I was caught by the police abusing Adderal and my parents were obviously informed. I then went to the psychiatrist so we could all talk. At this point, I was high off of 40 mg’s of OxyContin. The psychiatrist had no idea I was on anything, and proceeded to prescribe me the drug I was addicted to for “my ADHD”. I have been clean from all drugs for 8 days now, and feel much happier. I stopped taking the Paxil a few days ago,25 mg’s a day I was on, and am once again experiencing these shocks. I feel sick and am having trouble keeping food down. But I know I have to sit and wait it out. My story just proves how ignorant psychiatrists are and seem to have no clue what their medications or themselves are doing to have not even had a clue what was going on.

421 total views, 1 views today

1/9/2000 – The Legal Drugging Of America

The Legal Drugging Of America

Here is a recent article from Arianna Huffington. – Mark M.
———-

The Legal Drugging Of America: A Status Report
Filed December 23, 1999
by Arianna Huffington

Two reports out this month highlight the continuing trend toward the
legal drugging of America.

The Surgeon General’s report on the state of the nation’s mental health
found that 22 percent of the population has a diagnosable mental
disorder.” At the same time, a study by the National Institute of
Mental Health concluded that we are under-medicating our children and
that for those diagnosed with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder,
drugs — specifically Ritalin — are more effective than therapy.

The big drugmakers will no doubt use these studies as additional
weapons in their ongoing war to make mood-altering drugs the solution
to all life’s problems. Our magazines are already stuffed with ads
portraying pharmaceutical giants as noble enterprises, engaged in
nothing but the pursuit of pure science and the public good. And our
television screens are filled with commercials for drugs to cure
shyness and so-called “social phobias.”

The Food and Drug Administration has recently approved Effexor XR, a
drug for “generalized anxiety disorder” — the garden-variety
free-floating anxiety that has plagued humanity since the expulsion
from Eden. Mark Twain summed it up this way: “I am an old man, and
have known a great many troubles, but most of them never happened.”

These days, the assumption seems to be that drugs can take care of
everything unpleasant in the human condition. “At Pfizer,” one ad
boasts, “we look to the future with the knowledge that the only thing
incurable is our passion.” What the ad doesn’t mention is that drug
company profits (Pfizer’s last year were $3.35 billion) are often spent
not on finding cures for serious diseases but for “lifestyle”
maladies — baldness, toenail fungus, and of course any interruption to
a perpetually sunny mood. Not one major drug company in the United
States has an in-house research program on malaria, for example, but
sales of pharmaceutical drugs for pets are approaching $1 billion
annually.

The major flaw of the Surgeon General’s report is the lumping together
of dramatically disparate conditions. According to Surgeon General
David Satcher himself, “tragic and devastating disorders such a
schizophrenia, depression, and bipolar disorder, Alzheimer’s disease,
the mental and behavioral disorders suffered by children, and a range
of other mental disorders affect nearly one in five Americans in any
year.” This is a classic example of pseudo-scientific sleight of hand:
linking schizophrenia to childhood behavioral problems as though they
are in any meaningful sense on the same continuum.
It is this mind-set that has led to the Ritalin epidemic — with the
number of kids taking the powerful drug skyrocketing from 1 million in
1990 to 4 million today. And now along comes a study that says the
answer to those many instances where Ritalin has proved ineffective is
to simply up the dosage. As Dr. Peter Jensen from the National
Institute of Mental Health put it, “You find the dose that achieves
the absolute possible total benefit for this child … That’s the dose
you want, not the lowest possible dose that you can get by on.” It’s
ingenius, if Ritalin isn’t working, try more Ritalin. As they used to
say in the ’60s, “Why do you think they call it dope?”

It’s doubly tragic that these reports have arrived at a time when we’re
facing a crisis in managed health care. Because a diagnosis of a mental
disorder will almost always prompt managed care companies to take the
cheap way out — drugs rather than therapy, no matter how potentially
dangerous the long-term side effects, especially on children’s growing
brains.

Making this growing emphasis on drugs especially troubling is the
conclusion by federal investigators that the FDA has “no quality
control system” to track adverse drug reactions. Currently, doctors
and hospitals are not even legally required to report patients’ drug
side effects to the FDA. As a result, in one year, from the beginning
of June 1997 to the end of May 1998, the agency got only 13,825 such
reports even though in hospitals alone approximately 180,000 patients
die every year from drug reactions.

Even if the FDA moves from a voluntary to a mandatory reporting system,
the agency has only 80 employees to monitor more than 3,000
prescription drugs. Over the past year and a half, the agency has
banned only five drugs that it previously had approved but now deems
dangerous. But every year 2 million Americans are hospitalized due to
drug side effects.

“Most errors are not caused by stupidity, incompetence or neglect, but
by system failures that allow them to occur,” said David Lawrence,
head of Kaiser Permanente, suggesting that the safety tests done by
drug companies are not enough, and that the companies fail to educate
physicians and hospital workers on the proper administration of their
drugs.

As drugs, and the conditions treatable by drugs multiply, can we
continue to tolerate such slipshod oversight of a powerful industry
that so affects our lives — and our deaths? Or continue to rely on
reports tainted by the drug industry’s assumption that millions of
Americans are suffering from mental disorders whose cure is just a pill
pop away? Oh, the infinite possibilities of an America where everyone
has finally admitted to a mental disorder, and everyone is blissed-out
on appropriately high doses of the newest wonder drugs.

515 total views, 3 views today