zoloft

zoloft
George Mooney
I am the father of identical twin boys. The doctors that treated my sons when they were boys warned that if we ever decided to have them placed into care for the handicapped we should not agree to any physcotropic drugs. This is when I became aware of the danger of antidepressant drugs. My wife and I both agreed that this would be the case,
My wife passed away in 1984. I was diagnosed with a ”fatal” melanoma in 1986. My twins were admjtted to a ”care” agency and placed on Prozac for son David, and Zoloft for Douglas. They were placed in homes and ”supervised” which meant that they could not enjoy the freedom they enjoyed at home and were not allowed out of the sight of their caretakers for over twenty years. With the help of anti-drug people I visited a psychotherapist who asked why David was on Prozac, as he opined that David did not have a mental disorder. I then contacted a psychiatrist that asked the same question and agreed to withdraw the Prozac. David has been withdrawn from Prozac for about two years without any ill effects beyond what I precieve as side effect damage.
Douglas’ psychiatrist ignored my certified return reciept letters requesting as legal guardian that he be withdrawn from Zoloft. Douglas developed colon cancer and passed away after fourteen months of terrible suffering. Both my twins were gifted savants.

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ANTIDEPRESSANT: Famous German Football Goalkeeper Kills Self

Automatically translated from German into
English:

Paragraph seven reads:  “In Enke, the illness seems early
recognized, at the latest for its time in the FC Barcelona. Enke took
antidepressants.
Herewith it concerns medicines, that
interfere in the brain metabolism; that is disturbed in the very most
depressive.  Antidepressants provide that certain messenger materials and
neurotransmitter such as the  ‘good fortune hormone’  serotonin are
more long available at its cause place.  That applies above all to
medicines out of the group of the  ‘selective
serotonins resumption inhibitors’.”

http://www.rp-online.de/sport/fussball/nationalelf/Volkskrankheit-Depression_aid_781819.html

Hanover (RP).  Robert Enke has suffered for years from the mental
disorder.  It was treated with medicines.  Experts appreciate that
four million German suffer from depression.  Often they are the reason of
suicide.

People illnesses make before athletes not simply.  Also
depressions stand in the arenas of the trained, robust and successful in the
sick document of the treating physicians.  The difference to other
sorrows:  None speaks about that.  A tunnel in which from outside no
one looks in, and it is is the depression as an illness far more than an only a
November blues.

Another difference, about to pain phenomena:  Hardly
one can imagine, issued like it a depressive ­ unless, it experienced
depression itself.  It concerns one “affective interference” that partially
hereditarily is and combines several symptoms.  Information

The
power of the family

Psychoanalysts consider the depression to be an
expression of aggression against the self, whose roots in the families of the
become ill is to be seen, where children must adapt themselves too strongly the
needs of the parents.

Enkes family counted as extremely sporting and
performance-related.  Its father, by profession psychotherapist, was
successful 400-Meter-Läufer.

Depressive suffer from brood compulsion,
unrest, drive inhibition, mood narrow, irritability, anxiety, insomnia,
sadness.  Depressive live frequently in disguise before the world.  In
Robert Enke, that was the case.  Only dedicated know the true size of the
illness that passes and recurs (Rezidiv) frequently in phases.  Experts
appreciate that that of the about 12,000 suicide are committed per year in
Germany by persons, who suffer from depression.

In Enke, the illness
seems early recognized, at the latest for its time in the FC Barcelona. Enke
took antidepressants.  Herewith it concerns medicines, that interfere in
the brain metabolism; that is disturbed in the very most depressive.

Antidepressants provide that certain messenger materials and neurotransmitter
such as the “good fortune hormone” serotonin are more long available at its
cause place.  That applies above all to medicines out of the group of the
“selective serotonins resumption inhibitors”.

That Düsseldorfer medicine
sociologist Johannes Siegrist the model of the “gratification crisis” developed
according to what manifold illnesses emerge, if an employee attains achievement
high, that the employer lauds however hardly or not at all.  This imbalance
between high claim from within and weak encouragement from outside leads
frequently to heart illnesses, but also to depression.

Is certain that
this crisis also well earning top athletes can encounter.  Who in its
active life frequently setbacks, insult or non-recognition register must ­
because it is banished about again and again on the replacement bank, can
develop mental disorders.  Therapists would say:  No one can praise
herself so often even that it balances the depreciation experienced from outside
of the own competence.  Quotations

Our readers to death of Robert
Enke say took themselves that the soccer national goalkeeper on the 10th
November 2009 itself life.  We assembled reader voices to its suicide.
more

Frequently persons who give himself deliberately controlled
disguise, its sensitiveness ­ and also its stress.  Just chronic stress
releases however depression, one knows that out of laboratory analyses.  In
the blood and urine, one more depressively finds often clearly increased
concentrations of the stress hormone Cortisol.  It becomes overstrained
formed Stimulation of the axis between areas of the brain and the adrenal cortex
with them through one.  The so to speak unceasingly firing neurochemistry
provides for an increased excitement level, that is softened by those medicines
again.

Nevertheless, its effect is not can suffer purely symptomatic,
healthy it that.  That succeeds only in a psychotherapy or psychoanalysis,
at times in a special clinic.  Many depressive fear this way into the
clinic because through it its disease could become public.  Also on Enke,
this fear weighed.  Its suicide the last way seemed to it to get rid of all
anxieties finally.

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6/26/2001 – Part 1 – Creating an Epidemic of Columbine Shooters!!!

This week I was interviewed on CNN about new “research” on treating anxiety
in children with the SSRI, Luvox.

[I will first send you research out of Australia about anxiety and serotonin
levels along with an e-mail that just came in from a mother whose son had his
life ruined by Luvox and then I will send the Washington Post article next on
the study.]

I must say that we have taken insanity to an all new height with this recent
study out on anxiety in children. The same drug Eric Harris was on in the
Columbine High School shooting, Luvox, is the drug that was used in this
study to treat anxiety in children. But look at what behavior was considered
to be abnormal enough to give this drug that has “psychosis” listed as a
“frequent” side effect!

“Extreme separation anxiety disorder, he said, would be displayed in a child
who avoided birthday parties and sleepovers. A medium-grade example would be
children who refused to sleep in their own rooms and wanted to get into bed
with their parents.”

Now I don’t know about the rest of you, but I had a child that often jumped
in bed with mom and did not like birthday parties very much. Given a choice
between waiting for children to grow out of that as opposed to drugging them
into psychosis, should not be a difficult choice at all!

We don’t get to enjoy these little children in our lives for very long.
Before we know it they are grown and gone. Why not enjoy the short time they
want to crawl into bed with mom and dad to be cuddled and reassured that
everything is okay? But to look at this as a serious mental disorder for
which they need to be drugged?!! This is greed beyond anything imaginable!

When we look at the science behind anxiety disorders the insanity grows by
leaps and bounds because medical research over the last several decades has
continued to show (as documented in Prozac: Panacea or Pandora?) that
anxiety, along with other mood disorders, is associated with ELEVATED levels
of serotonin, rather than decreased levels of serotonin. So in a patient
suffering from anxiety, WHY would we want to increase already elevated levels
of serotonin with an SSRI?

Dr. Murray Ellis at the Baker Medical Research Institute in Melbourne,
Australia found last year that 75% of those suffering from various anxiety
disorders had EIGHT times higher levels of serotonin even on days when they
did not demonstrate anxiety symptoms.

So, as I asked on CNN, I once again ask, “Why on earth would we want to do
anything to increase serotonin in those who already demonstrate symptoms of
ELEVATED serotonin?”

My heart aches for these children who were tortured and maimed as guinea
pigs, given this deadly drug for the sole purpose of increasing the profits
of those who still have their hands dripping with the blood of all the
Columbine victims.

Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive Director,
International Coalition For Drug Awareness
www.drugawareness.org
____________________________

http://theage.com.au/news/20000514/A59189-2000May13.html

Dramatic reversal in research on anxiety

By STEVE DOW
Sunday 14 May 2000

Startling and unexpected findings on panic disorder patients could
fundamentally change the way anxiety and anxiety-related depression are
treated.

The findings by Melbourne’s Baker Medical Research Institute, presented to a
recent scientific meeting and soon to be submitted to the medical journal The
Lancet, have unsettled scientists and turned upside down their ideas on brain
chemistry among the anxious.

But the evidence from the work by cardiologist Professor Murray Esler and
colleagues is so strong that it is being taken seriously.

The scientists tested the levels of the mood-regulating chemical serotonin in
20 patients who suffer panic attacks and found that, even on a good day, the
average levels of the chemical in the brains of at least 15 of the patients
were eight times higher than normal.

Until now, the theory has been that anxiety, panic and anxiety-related
depression are caused by a lack or underactivity of serotonin in the brain.
Based on this theory, the selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor (SSRI)
wonder drugs that emerged in the ’90s – marketed as Prozac, Aropax and Zoloft
– are intended to increase serotonin around the brain neurons involved in
anxiety.

Professor Esler emphasised that the SSRIs were “great drugs” and should
remain worldwide bestsellers.

However, there were two important implications of the new research, he said.

First, the conventional view of how SSRIs operate has been challenged. It
would appear that the drugs are effective because, over time, they somehow
decrease, rather than increase, serotonin as originally thought.

Second, the new findings could spark drug companies to create drugs that stop
serotonin directly. Such a response might stop the common problem of
“serotonin agitation” experienced by many patients on SSRIs. These patients
experience increased anxiety in their first weeks of treatment on drugs such
as Prozac, Aropax and Zoloft; the drugs making the problem “worse before they
make it better”, Professor Esler said.

He said there was now compelling evidence that panic disorder and depression
were on a par with high blood pressure and smoking as risk factors for heart
disease. A study of several panic disorder patients had shown a spasm of
coronary arteries was common after an attack. One patient, a woman of 40,
suffered a clot and subsequent heart attack because of her panic disorder.

The Baker Institute wishes to recruit patients who suffer panic disorders and
depression for future studies. Contact the institute on 95224212.

NEWS 14: The Health Report
_____________________________________

Teenager on Luvox – aggressive, homicidal
3/26/01

This letter is for your feedback section on the net. In July of 1999 our son,
then 14 years old, was started on Luvox by a psychiatrist for treatment of
his compulsive behavior. We had actually taken him there for treatment of
depression, but the doctor said he was depressed because of his compulsive
disorder. As our son was 6 foot tall and 300+ pounds, the doctor eventually
had him on a dose up to 300 mg a day. Our son started to act very aloof and
irritable. When he was depressed he talked about killing himself, he would
sleep a lot, and he drew pictures of guns. But once on the Luvox, he became
aggressive towards us and would swing at us at the least provocation.

Just before Christmas he came up to me, his mother, and said, “Something is
wrong with me,” but he couldn’t explain it. I didn’t realize at all what he
meant. On Christmas he opened his gifts methodically with no expression on
his face. He had always loved this holiday and now he was acting like a
zombie.

In the winter of 2000, we got a call from his school that he had threatened
some people. The police were called. Apparently our son, who had never done
anything wrong in school or out, had been talking in the cafeteria about
killing the family of a girl he knew, then killing her. He went into graphic
detail and then looked at two boys who were sitting nearby listening and said
to them, “If you tell anyone, I’ll kill you”. The boys turned him in.

We found out through interviews the police had with other kids in the school
that our son had also plotted the same demise for another family of a girl he
knew. He had told this girl to her face. She and her family, however, knew
our son and knew this was not his normal behavior. They therefore did nothing
about it.

To make a long story short, he was arrested but not taken to jail
immediately because we begged to take him home and watch him 24 hours a day.
He had to be drug tested. He had to go to a partial program for troubled kids
for two weeks. He was given 10 days out of school suspension and the story,
of course, went all over the school. He lost his best friend because the
mother would not let him hang around with our son anymore. No one called to
support him or us. We were isolated from the community. We had to hire a
lawyer because the local police wanted to put him in jail. They had written
up a report that made our son look like he was insane. The report went to the
juvenile court and Children’s Services. We were visited by Children’s
Services and interviewed. Our son went through approximately three different
psychiatric evaluations; however, all of these were done after he was taken
off the Luvox. We had taken him off the drug after this all happened because
we were afraid it might have caused his behavior problem. I had read about
Columbine and knew the boy involved had been on Luvox too. The psychologists
who evaluated him found him to be fine except for depression; again, these
evaluations were after he was taken off the Luvox. Everyone who interviewed
him after he was off the Luvox could not believe he had threatened people
the way he did, he was not the same person.

We were lucky enough to have the case dismissed as it was our son’s first
offense as a juvenile and our state allows one mistake. They supposedly
closed the file, but the local police will have it open until our son is 18.
In the meantime, if he gets into any trouble, they will use it against him.

We pulled our son out of school and homeschooled him to keep him away from
the cruelty of the kids at school. We had to have him tutored and sent him to
summer school so that he could keep up with his class. He is now called a
“Sophomore” instead of a “Junior” because he was short 3/4ths of a credit,
even with all of our effort; although he will graduate with his class as a
Senior next year. The school told us he just won’t ever be a “Junior”. Our
son faces taunting to this day, not as bad as when he first went back to
school in the fall. A boy said “rape” next to him in class and a girl in the
class told her mother and the mother called the police about our son because
she had heard the story and thought he was the one talking about rape. The
guidance counselor told him this year that he has to watch everything that he
says. He cannot say certain words at school, like “gun”, “shoot”, “murder”,
etc because he could get in trouble.

This child will never be the same because of Luvox. His high school years are
a nightmare now and people in this small town will know him as being
“dangerous”. On the bright side, the families of the two girls that he
threatened refused to file any charges against our son because they knew this
was not his usual behavior and that something was “obviously wrong”.

The psychiatrist who gave our son the Luvox became very defensive immediately
after the episode and said that it was not the Luvox, it was our son. He said
that no cases had ever been won against SSRIs. He also told our son that what
he did was horrible, that nobody would ever forget it or forgive him and that
even if he went to another school, they would find out about it.

Can you imagine a psychiatrist saying this to a patient? Needless
to say, we left him after the legal aspect of the case was closed.

My son told me later that when he was on Luvox, he wasn’t afraid to do
anything. He said he had “no fear”.

We hope this will help make people aware of the dangers of Luvox and the
other SSRI drugs. I only wish there was some way to help the people like my
son who have lost so much to this drug.

Please do not print our name or our e-mail address.

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4/19/2001 – April Edition of ICFDA now Online

Twenty-three new articles from the past month have just been
selected from newspapers across the country and posted our
ICFDA site at http://www.drugawareness.org.

Included among them are two articles that offer proof there are
safer ways to treat depression then by taking pills. One is from
Newsweek entitled “Nourishing Your Brain,” which discusses
studies showing that fats in fish and walnuts can ward off
depression. Another from Reuters showing how aerobic
exercise effectively treats depression.

You will also want to read how a world-renowned scientist saw
his job offer evaporate after he warned that the popular
antidepressant Prozac might trigger suicide. The manufacturer
is an important donor to a mental health institute associated with
the university who courted the doctor. Read “Prozac Critic Sees U
of T Job Revoked.”

Have you seen the ads for Serafem?—the new “cure” for PMDD,
a mental disorder that has yet to be proven to exist? Careful, it’s
just repackaged Prozac in pretty, new pink coating. Be sure to
read the riveting expose by Kelly O’Meara entitled “Misleading
Medicince.”

Plus, there’s new information on Viagra, Rezulin, Accutane, MMR
vaccinations and more.

Mark

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4/07/2001 – Insight Mag – Misleading Medicine

Once again Kelly O’Meara has written an incredible article. This time the
subject is the absurdity of the PMDD diagnosis and the prescribing of Prozac
repacked and renamed as “Sarafem” for that “disorder.” We have included the
first several paragraphs for you and encourage you to go to the Insight
Magazine sight to read the rest.

The article gives much insight into the lengths to which Lilly will go to
cover up the fact that Prozac and Sarafem are one in the same drug.
Apparently as long as they do not admit it publicly it is not reality?

Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive Director,
International Coalition for Drug Awareness
http://insightmag.com/archive/200104301.shtml

InsightMag.com
——————————————————————————
Misleading Medicine
——————————————————————————
By Kelly Patricia OMeara
komeara@…
——————————————————————————

Pharmaceutical giant Eli Lilly is promoting Sarafem as a miracle pill for
women suffering from PMDD, a mental disorder not yet proved to exist.
Whats more, Eli Lilly admits that Sarafem has the same active ingredient as
Prozac, complete with the same dangerous side effects.

Australian-born singer Helen Reddys 1972 hit song I Am Woman has been
called a feminist battle hymn. Many a male disc jockey at the time refused to
air it until the song became part of the soundtrack to a movie and catapulted
to the top of the Billboard charts. Taking a look at the song today, its
hard to imagine the furor generated by the lyrics from the lady down under:
Oh, yes, I am wise, but its wisdom born of pain.
Yes, Ive paid the price, but look how much I gained.
If I have to I can do anything.
I am strong. I am invincible. I am woman.
Nearly three decades since the release of this feminist anthem the
lyrics neither threaten nor offend if they ever did but seem to
acknowledge pride in feminine strength. As if it needed to be said,
historians agree on the significance of women in the building of this nation.
The Jamestown settlement, for instance, was a disaster and on the brink of
failure until women were added to the new colony. The West was won by men and
women working side by side, and the United States triumphed over its enemies
in World War II with the help of nearly 500,000 women in the ranks and
millions more in the factories.
Not surprisingly, women achieved these feats completely unaware that a
few days out of each month they were suffering from a mental disorder. Thats
right. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently approved the use of
Sarafem (fluoxetine) for women suffering from a mental disorder just three or
four days a month in the luteal phase or just before the onset of
menses.
This mental disorder which the American Psychiatric Association
(APA) has not yet accepted, but which is listed in the appendix of the APAs
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) is called
premenstrual dysphoric disorder, or PMDD. Its a new-and-improved version of
premenstrual syndrome (PMS), which also has not made it to the hit parade of
the official APA list of mental illnesses. The fact that PMDD is listed only
in the diagnostic manuals appendix reflects the APAs desire for further
research before accepting it as a full-fledged mental disorder.
According to the DSM-IV and the FDA, a woman must experience five or
more symptoms before the diagnosis can be made. The unofficial mental
disorder is said to be characterized by the following symptoms:

Markedly depressed mood

Marked anxiety

Marked affectivity

Decreased interest in activities

Feeling sad, hopeless or self-deprecating

Feeling tense, anxious or on edge

Persistent irritability, anger and increased interpersonal conflicts

Feeling fatigued, lethargic or lacking in energy

Marked changes in appetite

A subjective feeling of being overwhelmed or out of control

Physical symptoms such as breast tenderness, swelling or bloating.

Eli Lilly and Co., the Indianapolis-based pharmaceutical company that
makes Sarafem, has been marketing the new treatment with such gusto that
there are jokes about the company exhibiting obsessive-compulsive disorder.
It seems there isnt a magazine to be picked up or a channel to be surfed
that isnt running a Sarafem advertisement.
These ads show women expressing many things. One TV spot depicts a
woman trying to button her slacks and looking angry and agitated. Another
scene shows a woman snapping at her husband, Just leave me alone, while
still another involves a woman slumped on the couch sobbing. Then there is
the slogan: Sarafem More like the woman you are.
Lilly reports in its ads that now, Doctors can treat PMDD with
Sarafem the first and only prescription medication for PMDD. The ad
further states that, Sarafem contains fluoxetine hydrochloride, the same
active ingredient found in Prozac. But both Sarafem and Prozac are
fluoxetine hydrochloride. According to Laura Miller, marketing associate for
Eli Lilly, Fluoxetine hydrochloride is the same active ingredient in Sarafem
as in Prozac. Again and again Insight asked, Then is it the same thing?
Again and again Miller only repeated that the two identical doses of
fluoxetine hydrochloride have the same active ingredient.
Miller refused to acknowledge that Sarafem is just Prozac repackaged,
or that the pill color was changed from green to feminine pink and lavender
to market it for a not-yet-approved mental disorder that never before
existed. The Lilly representative did say the difference in the treatments is
in how women react to the drug.
Never mind that all this dramatic hype, supported by millions of
dollars in marketing, has occurred just before Lilly loses its exclusivity on
Prozac in August. . . . to finish article go to:

http://insightmag.com/archive/200104301.shtml

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2/24/2001 – Wall Street Journal Questions PMDD & Sarafem (Prozac)

Here comes the crowd!! Now that Lilly has their approval by the FDA to use
Prozac for PMS (PMDD), all the other makers of SSRIs are racing to get their
drugs approved to get their share of the profits. If this was not such a
horrifying situation with so many dying such terrible deaths everyday, many
more becoming so disabled from these drugs, and so many families being torn
apart from the behavioral reactions, it would almost be funny.

What is most ironic is that the psychologist mentioned at the end of the
article is right. I see women with severe PMS who mix some purified water
with lemon juice and drink a gallon a day for the week before their period
and any sign of PMS leaves. There are so many simple alternative choices for
this that it is amazing that Lilly has convinced so many that they have the
answer in a drug! Even more amazing is that they convinced the FDA – but then
the FDA is always amazing me with what they allow the public to be exposed to
as “safe”!

Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive Director,
International Coalition for Drug Awareness
www.drugawareness.org
_________________________

Wall Street Journal, Section B, Front Page

February 23, 2001, Health Journal

Drug Firms Treat PMS As a Mental Disorder

By TARA PARKER-POPE
Staff Reporter of THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

IS SEVERE PMS, or premenstrual syndrome, a mental illness? Some
pharmaceutical companies and psychiatrists are treating it as one. In new
television ads, drug maker Eli Lilly is promoting the drug Sarafem to treat
the
problem, now dubbed Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder (PMDD). But the
pink and purple pills aren’t a new drug — they are simply repackaged
Prozac,
the popular antidepressant.

Makers of similar antidepressants, known as serotonin reuptake inhibitors,
or
SSRIs, also may follow suit. In January, Pfizer asked the FDA to approve
Zoloft to treat PMDD. Forest Laboratories’ Celexa and GlaxoSmithKline’s
Paxil also have been studied.

The medical community, however, remains divided about whether PMDD is a
real disorder or simply a way for drug companies to cast a wider net in
search
of new customers. Critics are particularly concerned about labeling women
as
mentally ill because of problems associated with menstrual cycles.

“When you start calling what PMS is a psychiatric disorder, what are you
saying about the women of this world?” says Nada Stotland, director of
psychiatric education at the Advocate Illinois Masonic Medical Center in
Chicago. “This lends itself to prejudices people already have about women
being moody and unreliable.”

ALTHOUGH THE FDA has approved Sarafem to treat PMDD, the
psychiatric community is still debating the legitimacy of the disorder. The
American Psychiatric Association includes PMDD in the appendix of its
current
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, the part of the
manual
reserved for issues needing further research before being officially
accepted as a mental illness.

Fueling skepticism about PMDD and Sarafem is the
fact that in August, Lilly, based in Indianapolis, loses
patent protection on Prozac, a drug with $2.6 billion
in sales last year, according to IMS Health. With
Sarafem, the firm now has a separate patent to use
the drug for PMDD through 2007, allowing it to
partially offset losses in sales as rivals produce
generic Prozac.

Repacking prescription drugs for other uses is
becoming more common. Glaxo, for example, has
repackaged its antidepressant Wellbutrin as the
stop-smoking aid Zyban.

Many physicians argue that PMDD is a legitimate mental illness triggered by
normal hormonal fluctuations in a woman’s menstrual cycle. About 3% to 5%
of
menstruating women are affected. “This is a subset of women who have
really,
really severe mood changes and changes in their behavior,” says Jean
Endicott,
professor of clinical psychology at Columbia University’s College of
Physicians
and Surgeons. “It can be very debilitating.”

Unlike other mental illnesses that affect a patient on a daily basis, PMDD
is said
to affect women during the week to two weeks before their period. The
symptoms include depression, anxiety, tension, anger, irritability and the
feeling
of being overwhelmed or out of control. Other symptoms also are typical of
traditional PMS, such as breast tenderness, headache, bloating and weight
gain.

In order to be diagnosed with PMDD, a patient must have at least five
symptoms, including one involving mood change, and be markedly impaired as
a result. Patients should track symptoms for two months before a diagnosis
is
made.

About 60% of women who take Sarafem for PMDD will be helped, according
to Dr. Endicott. Currently, the drug is taken every day, but researchers
are
studying dosing that would reduce the pills to several days a month,
limiting side
effects, which can include tiredness, upset stomach, nervousness, dizziness
and
difficulty concentrating.

A 38-YEAR-OLD Chicago flight attendant named Betsy, who didn’t want her
full name used, says the week before her period she felt like an
“over-wound
spring, getting wound tighter and tighter,” and would often scream and lose
control. “That’s not my normal disposition,” she says. “I knew something
wasn’t
right.”

She noticed the correlation with her menstrual cycle and discussed her
problems with her gynecologist, who prescribed Sarafem. “It has completely
taken away the symptoms,” she says.

Dr. Stotland and other critics, however, worry that eager patients may push
to
be prescribed Sarafem as a quick fix, preventing doctors from diagnosing
other
serious health problems. Dr. Stotland says research has shown that more
than
half of the women who believe they have severe PMS actually suffer from
other
problems, such as depression, panic disorder or even domestic violence.

Lilly’s marketing of Sarafem also has sparked controversy. The first ads
showed a frustrated woman wrestling with a shopping cart. “Think it’s PMS?
It
could be PMDD,” the ads said. But the FDA said the ads trivialized the
seriousness of PMDD, and the campaign was pulled. New ads show one
woman arguing with her husband and another frustrated because she can’t
button her pants.

Lilly spokeswoman Laura Miller says the ads attempt to show the full gamut
of
PMDD symptoms. “It’s up to the doctor and the woman to determine whether
she has PMDD and whether treatment is appropriate,” she says.

But Paula Caplan, a psychologist and affiliated scholar at Brown
University’s
Pembroke Center for Research and Teaching on Women, says instead of
labeling women as mentally ill, physicians should urge diet changes,
exercise,
less caffeine and even calcium supplements. “But nobody makes much money
off calcium tablets,” she adds.

E-mail comments to Tara Parker-Pope at healthjournal@…

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