Effexor & Alcohol: Female teacher found not criminally responsible for sex with male teen student

Paragraphs six through nine read:  “According to a statement of facts agreed upon by the Crown and defence, during the summer of 2008 Francoeur was mistakenly diagnosed with major depression and prescribed an anti-depressant drug known as Effexor. During the next few months, she underwent a radical change.”

“Francoeur actually has bipolar disorder rather than depression ­ and Effexor is known to escalate the  ‘manic’ phase experienced by people with bipolarism, which is characterized by extreme feelings of elation, euphoria, racing thoughts, inability to sleep and difficulty appreciating consequences, court heard.”

“Although she had previously been a very light drinker, Francoeur started using alcohol excessively, Piche told court. She spent money in careless ways, went days without sleep and ate irregularly, losing significant amounts of weight. She talked excessively and tookuncharacteristic shortcuts in caring for her daughters, who were five and seven years old.”

“The changes concerned her family members, who sent a letter to Francoeur’s doctor about the situation.”
———————–

SSRIStories.com & Drugawareness.org note:  There are now 15 cases on SSRI Stories of women school teachers molesting their minor male students.  Bill O’Reilly of the TV talk show, “The Factor” said they are receiving one case report every week. SSRI Stories does not have the resources to investigate these reports in regard to antidepressant use.

SSRIStories.com & Drugawareness.org note: Another additional note: The Physicians Desk Reference states that antidepressants can cause a craving for alcohol and can cause alcohol abuse. (Check out the SSRIs & Alcohol article at www.drugawareness.org for additional information on alcohol cravings.) Also, the liver cannot metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol simultaneously, thus leading to higher levels of both alcohol and the antidepressantin the human body. 
http://www.vancouversun.com/news/Teacher+found+criminally+responsible+with+teen+student/4227894/story.html
Effexor & Alcohol: Female teacher found not criminally responsible for sex with male teen student
 
By Lori Coolican, Postmedia News February 4, 2011
 
A Saskatchewan teacher has been found not criminally responsible for having sex with a 15-year-old former student.

Photograph by: Joe Raedle, Getty Images
SASKATOON ­ Family and supporters of a teacher from Shell Lake, Sask., sighed with relief in a Saskatoon courtroom Friday after a judge declared her not criminally responsible, due to mental illness, for a sexual relationship with a 15-year-old former student.

Michelle Francoeur was in an extreme “manic state” and lacked the capacity to make rational decisions when she agreed to have sex with the teen boy on several occasions between Sept. 1 and Nov. 20, 2008, Queen’s Bench Justice Duane Koch found.

“The criminal law does not want to punish people who were suffering a mental disorder at the time of the act,” Crown prosecutor Mitch Piche said outside court.

Francoeur was charged with sexual touching, sexual exploitation and sexual assault against the teen, whose identity is protected by a publication ban, after RCMP received a complaint in December 2008.

She was suspended from her job at the Shell Lake school while the case was before the court.

According to a statement of facts agreed upon by the Crown and defence, during the summer of 2008 Francoeur was mistakenly diagnosed with major depression and prescribed an anti-depressant drug known as Effexor. During the next few months, she underwent a radical change.

Francoeur actually has bipolar disorder rather than depression ­ and Effexor is known to escalate the “manic” phase experienced by people with bipolarism, which is characterized by extreme feelings of elation, euphoria, racing thoughts, inability to sleep and difficulty appreciating consequences, court heard.

Although she had previously been a very light drinker, Francoeur started using alcohol excessively, Piche told court. She spent money in careless ways, went days without sleep and ate irregularly, losing significant amounts of weight. She talked excessively and took uncharacteristic shortcuts in caring for her daughters, who were five and seven years old.

The changes concerned her family members, who sent a letter to Francoeur’s doctor about the situation.

The boy had been in Francoeur’s class the previous school year, but no longer attended the school where she taught. They had exchanged text messages once that summer and one night in October he sent her a flirtatious text that resulted in their first sexual encounter, Piche said.

Several more incidents followed, until the boy’s mother discovered the situation.

Defence lawyer Aaron Fox noted Franceour would likely not have been charged with a crime had the incidents happened six months earlier, before changes to the Criminal Code raised the legal age of consent for sexual activity from 14 to 16.

Shell Lake is 175 kilometres north of Saskatoon.

lcoolican@thestarphoenix.com

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PAXIL: Acquitted of DUI: Involuntary Intoxication: Virginia

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy
(www.drugawareness.org):

Because the package insert for Paxil
warns that this antidepressant does produce “alcohol cravings” and we know how
common it is for mania to be induced by SSRIs, with one type of mania being
“Dipsomania” – an overwhelming compulsion to drink alcohol” – this
information needs to be spread far and wide ASAP! Patients are NOT warned
of this when they are given this drug! Few are even given the package insert
which is a “failure to warn” on the part of both the drug maker and the
pharmacist. How many DUIs are being caused by the SSRI antidepressants? We know
that DUIs in middle aged women, the main users of SSRIs, have DOUBLED over
a recent 10 year period. Is there a connection? As a society we need to know.
Where is MADD on this issue?
___________________________________________
The Fifth case from the end reads:  “Defendant was on Paxil, an
anti-depressant drug, and had a few drinks after playing golf. He was arrested
and charged with DUI after weaving through traffic.  He was “obviously
impaired” according to his lawyer.  ‘The worst I’d ever seen in 25 years’.”

“An expert testified that Paxil, taken with alcohol, has an “additive
effect” in some people.  The Defendant was never told about this.  The
Court acquitted the Defendant because to self-administer an intoxicant, one must
be aware that they are consuming an intoxicant.

http://virginiadui.poweradvocates.com/dui_defenses.html

4.
Involuntary Intoxication .  Commonwealth v. Moore, February, 2003 (Fairfax
Co. GDC).

Defendant was on Paxil, an anti-depressant drug, and had a few
drinks after playing golf.  He was arrested and charged with DUI after
weaving through traffic.  He was “obviously impaired” according to his
lawyer.  “The worst I’d ever seen in 25 years.”

An expert testified
that Paxil, taken with alcohol, has an “additive effect” in some people.

The Defendant was never told about this.  The Court acquitted the Defendant
because to self-administer an intoxicant, one must be aware that they are
consuming an intoxicant.

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LEXAPRO: Vehicular Manslaughter: No Alcohol: Idaho

Paragraph three freads:  “The prosecutor’s office
previously alleged Stevens was either under the influence of drugs or alcohol,
or was grossly negligent in causing Redfern’s death.
They alleged he had been involved in four crashes on that day, two prior
to the fatal crash and one immediately afterward.”

Paragraphs
seven and eight read:  Stevens failed two sobriety tests, court documents
allege, and appeared increasingly intoxicated as police questioned him. He
reportedly said he had taken Lexapro, an anti-anxiety and
anti-depressant drug, and was taking Prozac, an antidepressant.
A
bottle of Baclofen, a muscle relaxant, was allegedly found in the rental
truck.

“However, tests done on blood taken from Stevens after his arrest
came back negative for intoxicants [alcohol], according to court
documents. Stevens was not charged in any of the other alleged crashes that
day.”

http://www.magicvalley.com/news/local/article_82226ad0-3e75-5e78-95fe-27073b884547.html

Stevens pleads guilty to vehicular manslaughter

By
Ariel Hansen – Times-News writer | Posted: Thursday, January 21, 2010 1:00 am |
(0)
Comments

HAILEY ­ Nearly a year after Bert Redfern died in a
March 10 car crash on Idaho Highway 75 in Hailey, a Twin Falls man has pleaded
guilty to misdemeanor vehicular manslaughter for the fatal crash.

Cody
Stevens, 29, of Twin Falls, had been charged with felony vehicular manslaughter.
On Tuesday, just weeks before his district court trial was set to begin, he
pleaded guilty to the misdemeanor, which carries a penalty of up to a year in
prison and a $2,000 fine.

The prosecutor’s office previously alleged
Stevens was either under the influence of drugs or alcohol, or was grossly
negligent in causing Redfern’s death. They alleged he had been involved in four
crashes on that day, two prior to the fatal crash and one immediately
afterward.

According to court documents, Stevens allegedly left his job
in Jerome after a 12-hour shift at 6 a.m. March 10, and drove north. In Lincoln
County, he was allegedly reported as a reckless driver after he got close enough
to “rub mirrors” with the reporting party at about 7:20 a.m. At about 9:45, he
allegedly hit a tree south of Bellevue, telling police he swerved to avoid a
deer.

After leaving his totaled truck in Bellevue and renting a truck in
Hailey, Stevens returned to a Bellevue body shop. He then headed toward Ketchum
when he allegedly caused the noon-time collision that resulted in Redfern’s
death. He then allegedly flipped his rental truck onto a curb in downtown
Hailey, where police took him into custody.

Stevens failed two sobriety
tests, court documents allege, and appeared increasingly intoxicated as police
questioned him. He reportedly said he had taken Lexapro, an anti-anxiety and
anti-depressant drug, and was taking Prozac, an antidepressant. A bottle of
Baclofen, a muscle relaxant, was allegedly found in the rental
truck.

Stevens was taken for blood testing at St. Luke’s Wood River
Regional Medical Center, and he was later taken back to the hospital after
becoming increasingly unresponsive and incoherent during police questioning,
according to court documents.

However, tests done on blood taken from
Stevens after his arrest came back negative for intoxicants, according to court
documents. Stevens was not charged in any of the other alleged crashes that
day.

A civil case for wrongful death is pending against Stevens, filed by
Redfern’s widower, and Stevens’ plea to misdemeanor vehicular manslaughter can
be used against him in that case.

The county case has been sent back to
the magistrate court, and a sentencing hearing has not yet been
scheduled.

Ariel Hansen may be reached at ahansen@magicvalley.com or
208-788-3475.

Posted in Local, Crime-and-courts

on Thursday, January 21, 2010 1:00 am Updated: 10:57 pm.
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ZOLOFT: Wrongful Death Suit Filed in Behalf of the Andrea Roberts’ Family

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy:

FINALLY!!!! A wrongful death suit that states these SSRI
wrongful death cases for what they really are: cold blooded premeditated murder!
When the risk is known and not stated, then what else could it be
other than premeditated murder? If it was an individual, rather than a wealthy
corporation who did this you had better believe they would be facing
premeditated murder charges.
___________________________________________
The label did contain a warning that children and teenagers
may have an increased risk of suicidal thinking, but it did not mention adults
being at risk of committing suicide or that the drug could cause any homicidal
thoughts or actions.

Because of the omissions from the label, the

plaintiffs allege Pfizer committed “fraud, misrepresentation, intentional
infliction of emotional distress, aggravated or gross negligence, battery,
assault, and potentially, premeditated murder.” . . .

“Defendants’
conduct was extreme and outrageous in character, and so extreme in degree as to
go beyond all possible bounds of decency as to be regarded as atrocious and
utterly intolerable in a civilized society,” the suit states.

Suit blames anti-depressant drug for 2007 murder-suicide
10/1/2009 2:43 PM By Marilyn Tennissen

[]

SHERMAN — In a suit recently transferred to the East
Texas federal court, the maker of a popular anti-depressant drug is being blamed
for a murder-suicide committed by a woman who had taken the drug.

Court
papers say that after taking Pfizer’s drug Zoloft, 41-year-old Andrea Roberts

shot and killed her two children and husband before turning the gun on
herself.

Her parents, Glenda and John Robert McCoy, and brother, John
Andrew McCoy, acting pro se, first filed a suit in Denton County on July 31 on
behalf of decedents Jon Andrea Roberts, Michael Roberts, Micayla Roberts and
Dylan Roberts.

Pfizer Inc., Pfizer Chairman Jeffrey Kindler, Pfizer
subsidiary Greenstone Pharmaceuticals and Does 1-50 were named as defendants.


Pfizer had the case transferred to the Sherman Division of
the Eastern District of Texas on Sept. 28.

According to the suit, on
July 24, 2007, Andrea Roberts bought Zoloft from a Tom Thumb Pharmacy in Flower
Mound.

Zoloft is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor prescribed to
patients for many psychiatric conditions and is designed to be taken orally once
a day or more often as directed by a physician.

The suit does not state
why Roberts was taking the medication, how long she had taken it or the doctor
who had prescribed it.


One week after she picked up the prescription, Andrea
Roberts and her family were dead.

Andrea Roberts allegedly shot and
killed her two children Micayla and Dylan, her husband, Michael, and then
committed suicide at their home in Denton on July 31, 2007. According to the

suit, in the days leading up to the incident Roberts had become paranoid and
delusional.

The surviving plaintiffs allege that the product Zoloft

caused these violent acts,” the complaint states. “In the alternative, the
surviving plaintiffs allege that the product Zoloft was a contributing cause
accounting for causing or worsening decedent Andrea Roberts‘ condition to the

point of causing paranoia, psychosis, homicidal thinking or other symptoms
inhibiting her judgment leading to the commission of homicidal and suicidal
actions.”

In its Notice of Removal, Pfizer argues there are many
inconsistencies in the plaintiffs’ complaint.

“Although this action can
be fairly characterized as a products liability case, plaintiffs purport to
assert a wide variety of claims in this lawsuit and their Petition is confusing
and contradictory,” Pfizer states.

The plaintiffs argue that because

Andrea Roberts did not consent to taking “a drug that causes homicide,” she
should be considered “involuntarily intoxicated” and therefore not guilty of
contributory negligence or assumption of risk.

Pfizer knew from reports
and studies that Zoloft could cause homicidal actions, the suit alleges, but
failed to include that information on the drug’s warning label.

The

label did contain a warning that children and teenagers may have an increased
risk of suicidal thinking, but it did not mention adults being at risk of
committing suicide or that the drug could cause any homicidal thoughts or
actions.

Because of the omissions from the label, the plaintiffs allege
Pfizer committed “fraud, misrepresentation, intentional infliction of emotional
distress, aggravated or gross negligence, battery, assault, and potentially,
premeditated murder.”

They also claim a safer alternative design of the

drug existed, but Pfizer “chose to manufacture and the dangerous drug anyway.”

“Defendants’ conduct was extreme and outrageous in character, and so
extreme in degree as to go beyond all possible bounds of decency as to be
regarded as atrocious and utterly intolerable in a civilized society,” the suit

states.

The plaintiffs cite several causes of action throughout the
complaint.

Pfizer argues that while the plaintiffs appear to be
asserting a claim for products liability, they also assert claims for negligent
manufacture, design and marketing; a wrongful death and survival action; and
intentional infliction of emotional distress as well as actual and punitive
damages.

They are also claiming breach of warranty, fraud,
misrepresentation, aggravated or gross negligence, battery, assault and even
murder.


Pfizer writes that the complaint incorrectly lists
Greenstone Pharmaceuticals as a subsidiary of Pfizer when it is not.

In
addition, Jeffrey Kindler is listed as a defendant in the style of the case, but

the petition does not identify him as a party to the case and there are no
allegations against Kindler in the complaint.

As to damages, Pfizer
points out the varying amounts mentioned in the plaintiffs’ petition.

In

one place, the plaintiffs state they are seeking to recover $900,000 in Andrea‘s
lost earnings and $4 million for Michael’s.

Then they ask for $23
million for the products liability claims, $20,000 for funeral and burial costs,
$1 million for each of the surviving plaintiffs and $5 million for each of the

decedents to compensate them for their loss of affection, companionship and
pecuniary support.

At other places in the complaint, it states
plaintiffs are limiting damages to $50,000.

The pro se Plaintiffs’
Petition appears to have been put together using a legal form,” Pfizer writes.

Pfizer is represented by Laura E. De Santos of Clark, Thomas &

Winters PC in Houston. Jack E. Urquhart of Clark, Thomas is of
counsel.

The case has been assigned to U.S. District Judge Michael H.
Schneider and referred to Magistrate Judge A. L. Mazzant.

Case No.
4:09-cv-496-MHS-ALM

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09/23/1999 – Analysis of Sudden Retraction in Ashbrook Case

The following comes to the ICFDA courtesy of Ian Goddard, a tireless
researcher and journalist sympathetic to our mission of educating
others to the dangers of mind-altering medications:

The report that Prozac was found in the home of Larry Gene Ashbrook,
who went on a murder spree in a Texas church, has suddenly changed. The
AP reports that investigator “Lt. Mark Krey retracted his earlier
remarks in which he said police found a vial of the antidepressant
Prozac with Ashbrook’s name on it.” [1]

The new story is that the only medications in the house were his
fathers, but the father of Larry is named Jack — two different names!
How could police have mistaken a vial with the name “Jack” on it for
one with the name “Larry” on it? The initial report states:

“A doctor had prescribed the anti-depressant drug Prozac for Larry Gene
Ashbrook … police found a Prozac vial with Ashbrook’s name and want
to ask doctors why it was prescribed. …FBI officials said they ALSO
found nine vials of prescription drugs for Jack Ashbrook…” (emphasis
added) [2]

So the initial report clearly indicates that a distinction had been
made between vials with “Larry” on them and vials with “Jack” on them,
since nine vials belonged to Jack and one vial belonged to Larry. It
also stipulates that since the Prozac vial was Larry’s, they planned to
take the next step of contacting the doctor who made the prescription,
which indicates that they were really sure it said “Larry,” not “Jack.”

Furthermore, the initial Star-Telegram report said that Larry’s father
was “his anchor to reality and his caretaker to ensure he took his
medication.” But now it seems that his father did not ensure he took
his medication because it suddenly seems that he took no medication.
There out is to say he took another medication.

Gee, this certainly appears to have all the signs of a cover-up. In
fact, such a dramatic change of story is prima-facie evidence of a
cover-up. The WorldNetDaily recently reported that anti-psychiatry
activist Dennis Clarke

“…claims that pharmaceutical companies go to great lengths and
expense to cover up the problems that take place. When an incident of
violence occurs, the pharmaceutical “crash teams” go to work to keep
things quiet, according to Clarke.

Teams of psychiatrists are sent to the places where incidents take
place and quickly work to see that medical records are kept sealed,
doctors are convinced to remain silent, and victims are given
monetary payments to prevent them from ever going to court.

“It’s all being covered up, and it’s deliberate. There are billions
and billions of dollars at stake here,” explained Clarke. …” [3]

Think how easy it could be, a couple million dollars could change a lot
of stories, like maybe the one that just changed. Such expenses could
easily be less than the loses in sales that would occur if people
realize that these drugs are harmful and if law suits start rolling in
not only from users but the people they killed. Clearly, there needs to
be an investigation of this now-we-found-it-now-we-didn’t
investigation.

[1] AP: Police retract remarks about drugs found:
http://www.express-news.net/auth/ennews/ap/texas/d0645.html

[2] The Star-Telegram: Prozac found at Wedgwood
Baptist killer’s house. By Kathy Sanders 9/20/99:
http://www.star-telegram.com/news/doc/1047/1:METRO22/1:METRO22092199.ht
ml
http://www.star-telegram.com/news/doc/1047/1:DFW2/1:DFW2092199.html

[3]
http://www.worldnetdaily.com/bluesky_bresnahan/19990429_xex_doping_our_
k.sht
ml

GODDARD’S JOURNAL: http://www.erols.com/igoddard/journal.htm

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09/21/1999 – Prozac Found at Wedgwood Baptist Killer’s House

This just released today.

Prozac found at Wedgwood Baptist killer’s house
By Kathy Sanders
Star-Telegram Staff Writer

FORT WORTH — A doctor had prescribed the anti- depressant drug Prozac
for Larry Gene Ashbrook, but investigators are unsure whether he had
been taking it when he killed seven people and then himself in a
southwest Fort Worth church last week, police said yesterday.

http://www.star-telegram.com/news/doc/1047/1:TOPSTORY/1:TOPSTORY092199.html

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