Treating Depression Alternatively: BC Docs Use new treatments for depression

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/british-columbia/bc-doctors-learn-new-treatments-for-mood-disorders/article1492091/

Treating Depression

B.C. doctors learn new treatments for mood disorders

David Floody is a retired schoolteacher and now writer based in Tofino, B.C., where he uses a mental health training program and activities like running to battle effects of depression and seasonal affective disorder.David Floody is a retired schoolteacher and now writer based in Tofino, B.C., where he uses a mental health training program and activities like running to battle effects of depression and seasonal affective disorder. GEOFF HOWE FOR THE GLOBE AND MAIL

Program trains GPs to use coaching, self-help; Backers of innovative B.C. program hope it will lead to a revolution across Canada

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ANTIDEPRESSANT: 14 Year Old Girl Kills 3 Year Old: Canada

Paragraph 15 reads:  “But fetal alcohol syndrome,
attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, disruptive, hostile and threatening
behaviour ­ behaviour that escalated before her period and required
anti-depressant and anti-anxiety medication to quell ­
and functioning at the level of a child half the girl‘s age didn’t faze
Hamilton.”

http://www.stcatharinesstandard.ca/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=2367695

Inquest opens into boy’s killing

Posted By TIFFANY MAYER Standard Staff

The three-yearold boy signed the word across the dinner table to the daughter of
his Welland foster mom.

He did it to show he understood the young
woman’s message to him ­ also said with sign language to quiet the talkative
tot ­ that the 14yearold girl joining them at the table, who arrived that
mid-December day in 2005 to stay with them, was a friend.

The next
morning, foster mom Margaret Hamilton found the gregarious boy lying on his
bedroom floor, cold and grey.

He had been smothered by his friend, a
Crown ward in the care of Family and Children’s Services Niagara, who confessed
her crime in a note left near the boy’s body and calmly brushed her freshly
washed hair in her bedroom as Hamilton and her daughter frantically called for
help.

The girl, who cannot be identified, was given a seven-year

sentence in November 2007 for second-degree murder.

On Monday, during
the first day of a coroner’s inquest that will examine the events surrounding
the tragedy, Hamilton relived the events leading to the Dec. 15, 2005 death of
the boy, who was in the care of the Haldimand-Norfolk Children’s Aid Society.

Due to a publication ban, the boy can’t be named.

The inquest,
presided over by Dr. James Edwards, is being held at the Quality Hotel Parkway
Convention Centre on Ontario Street. It is expected to take three weeks.

A five-person jury will hear from about 30 witnesses, including police,
a forensic pathologist, social workers, educators who worked with the girl,
foster families and, possibly, the perpetrator herself.

At the end of
the proceedings, the jury can choose to make recommendations that can be used to
prevent similar deaths in the future.

The circumstances surrounding the death “cry out for some kind of
examination,” coroner counsel Eric Siebenmorgen said.

As she answered
Siebenmorgen’s questions, Hamilton talked about the notes she took when she got
the call that FACS Niagara would like to make use of a bed in her Welland home.
It was a bed that she decided to reserve for the agency after moving to Niagara
from neighbouring Haldimand County a year earlier.

She had been a foster
parent with Haldimand-Norfolk CAS for more than four years when the 14yearold

girl, who had recently been raped and was arrested for stealing a van, would be
coming to stay with her.

The list of issues plaguing the teen was long
and troublesome to anyone unfamiliar with caring for foster children,
Siebenmorgen noted.

But fetal alcohol syndrome, attention deficit
hyperactivity disorder, disruptive, hostile and threatening behaviour ­
behaviour that escalated before her period and required anti-depressant and
anti-anxiety medication to quell ­ and functioning at the level of a child
half the girl‘s age didn’t faze Hamilton.

“I fostered a lot of teenage
girls, a lot of runners, and almost always seemed to have good rapport with
them,” she said.

What she did question, though, was how the girl was
with young children, Hamilton told the inquest.

The boy, who had
recently been returned to Hamilton’s home after time with his biological mother,
had been roughed up by an eight-yearold girl who had stayed briefly with
Hamilton a couple weeks earlier.

“I wanted him to get settled and feel
comfortable,” Hamilton said. “I didn’t want anything upsetting him …. The
response to that was, ‘No, she likes little kids.’ ”

But looking back,
as Siebenmorgen asked her to do, Hamilton said she felt the half-hour that the

girl‘s caseworker spent at her home when dropping off the teen seemed short and
rushed.

That evening, as dinner was eaten, TV was watched and everyone
called it a night, nothing seemed out of the ordinary, until she went to rouse
the boy the next morning and get him ready for a pre-school Christmas party.

In hindsight, Hamilton said she would have liked to have seen some of
the notes in the girl‘s file with FACS, written between 2000 and 2003, before
agreeing to accept her. The teen was the first foster child from FACS Niagara
that Hamilton welcomed into her home.

Two incidents in particular
concerned Hamilton: a report of the girl allegedly putting another child’s head
through a window and another accusation of her pushing a child down stairs.

“I believe if I had those notes, I wouldn’t have chosen to have someone
with that background in the home, just because there was a small child in my
home,” Hamilton said.

The inquest continues Tuesday with
cross-examination by counsel for the boy’s biological family.
Article ID#
2367695

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Policeman Becomes Violent: Canada

Paragraphs four through seven read:  “In an agreed statement of facts, Gulick became
violently angry after failing his use of force requalification. After swearing
at instructors, Gulick went home and, before other officers arrived, overturned
furniture, stabbed a couch and wall with a butcher knife, punched a picture
frame and fought with his wife.”

“The hearing was told Gulick was
on anti-depressants and had consumed half a bottle of
Scotch.”

“But it was when he was told he was being arrested later that
evening that Gulick went ballistic.”

“Sgt. James Heafy said a tense but
overall calm situation quickly became a “life-or-death struggle” as Gulick
fought back.”

Drugawareness & SSRI Stories Note:  The
Physicians Desk Reference states that antidepressants

can cause a craving for alcohol and alcohol abuse. Also, the liver cannot metabolize the antidepressant and the
alcohol simultaneously,  thus leading to higher levels of both alcohol
and the antidepressant
in the human body.

http://cnews.canoe.ca/CNEWS/Canada/2010/01/12/12428306-qmi.html

Violent cop acted ‘superhuman’

Constable pleads guilty
to discreditable conduct at hearing
By SCOTT TAYLOR, QMI Agency

OTTAWA – A police
disciplinary hearing heard dramatic testimony yesterday about Const. Jeff
Gulick’s violent conduct in May 2008.

Gulick pleaded guilty yesterday to
discreditable conduct under the Police Services Act.

He had previously
been found guilty of assaulting a police officer, uttering threats to cause
bodily harm, escaping lawful custody and mischief after officers tried to arrest
him at his home May 22, 2008.

In an agreed statement of facts, Gulick
became violently angry after failing his use of force requalification. After
swearing at instructors, Gulick went home and, before other officers arrived,
overturned furniture, stabbed a couch and wall with a butcher knife, punched a
picture frame and fought with his wife.

The hearing was told Gulick was
on anti-depressants and had consumed half a bottle of Scotch.

But it was
when he was told he was being arrested later that evening that Gulick went
ballistic.

Sgt. James Heafy said a tense but overall calm situation
quickly became a “life-or-death struggle” as Gulick fought back.

“He
started grabbing at my right side and I could feel my holster and gunbelt being
pulled.”

Gulick threatened to kill his fellow cops as he struggled with
what Const. Michael O’Reilly said was “superhuman” strength.

Gulick was
finally overcome after being shocked with a Taser by one of four officers who
had joined the fight.

Gulick was taken to the Ottawa Hospital’s Civic
Campus emergency room, but when they arrived Gulick had shed both wrist and
ankle cuffs and bolted across Carling Ave. to the Experimental Farm, where he
once again was shot with a Taser.

O’Reilly said the situation had “gone
as sideways as it can go.”

Earlier yesterday, a female police officer
testified she feels like an outcast among fellow officers as a result of her
involvement and subsequent testimony in Gulick’s disciplinary hearing.

Sgt. Holly Watson said she’s heard “through the rumour mill” that fellow
officers support Gulick and there “was never any support for the four of us who
were assaulted (by Gulick during the arrest).”

Watson added she has
received no support from the Police Association either. She also testified that
she still worries about where Gulick is when she goes to her car after work.

Police Chief Vern White is scheduled to testify today.

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ANTIDEPRESSANT: Violent Assault on a Minor: Canada

Paragraph one reads:  “A New Brunswick man accused of a
violent assault Friday will undergo a psychiatric
assessment.”

Paragraph four reads:  “He said Goodine’s sister, a

social worker, informed him that Goodine has been diagnosed with a chemical
imbalance and takes medication for
depression
.”

http://dailygleaner.canadaeast.com/cityregion/article/859688

Psych exam ordered

A New Brunswick man accused of a violent

assault Friday will undergo a psychiatric assessment.

Corey Thomas
Goodine, 35, appeared briefly in provincial court Monday to face a Nov. 13 count
of aggravated assault, alleging an attack on a minor.

Duty counsel Joseph
FitzPatrick asked the court Monday to send Goodine for a 30-day psychiatric
assessment to determine if he’s fit to stand trial or might be exempt from
criminal responsibility for his alleged actions.

He said Goodine’s
sister, a social worker, informed him that Goodine has been diagnosed with a

chemical imbalance and takes medication for depression.

Crown prosecutor
Cameron Gunn didn’t oppose the request.

Judge Julian Dickson ordered the
assessment.

Goodine will return to court Dec. 16.

After an
incident at St. Mary’s First Nation on Friday, an arrest warrant was issued for
Goodine.

He turned himself in later that day in Perth
Andover.
.

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ANTIDEPRESSANT: Woman Becomes Violent: Canada

Paragraphs 20 through 22 read: “Her fiance told the court they were arguing because he disapproved of her drinking. A Type 1 diabetic, Maitland was also taking medication for anxiety and depression.”

“She said she had not taken her scheduled insulin that night. She told the judge that the medication she’s taken for seven years to treat anxiety and depression affects her memory.”

“‘It makes things a little more fuzzy,’ she said.”

SSRI Stories Note: The Physicians Desk Reference states that antidepressants can cause a craving for alcohol and alcohol abuse. Also, the liver cannot metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol simultaneously, thus leading to higher levels of both alcohol and the antidepressant in the human body.


http://nnsl.com/northern-news-services/stories/papers/aug31_09arm.html#Scene_1

Charged for flicking blood

 Ebony Maitland is accused of mischief and assaulting a police bloodElizabeth McMillan
Northern News Services
Published Monday, August 31, 2009

SOMBA K’E/YELLOWKNIFE – A woman accused of assaulting a police officer told a judge Thursday that after responding to an RCMP officer’s request to see her bleeding wrist, he pepper sprayed her, and dragged her to a police cruiser by her hair.

Ebony Maitland is accused of mischief and assaulting a police officer after her blood made contact with an officer during her arrest on July 6, 2008. – Elizabeth McMillan/NNSL photo

Thirty-year-old Ebony Maitland is also on trial by judge in Territorial Court for a charge of mischief.

The assault charge stems from an allegation by police that when she extended her arm, she flicked blood onto RCMP Const. Phil Unger’s face, who was standing about a metre away.

The woman told Chief Judge Brian Bruser she had cut her arm in two places after smashing it through a window during a night of heavy drinking and arguing with her fiance.

During cross examination, Crown prosecutor Diane Keats did not dispute Maitland’s claims about the pepper spray, and being dragged into the police cruiser by her hair, but questioned the accused’s memory about the nature of the interaction between herself and Unger and the manner in which she moved her arm.

Maitland said she recalled being told she was under arrest for causing a disturbance when Unger asked to see her injury. She said she extended her arm with her palm facing upwards.

“He wanted to know how bad it was,” she said. “We didn’t have a conversation. He just asked to see my wrist.”

Unger and another RCMP officer, Const. Jarret MacDonald, responded to a call of a domestic disturbance at Ptarmigan Apartments on July 6, 2008 at around 5 a.m., according to Keats. Maitland was in the parking lot when they arrived, said the prosecutor.

The five-foot-seven, 150-pound woman was barefoot and wearing only shorts and a T-shirt when she was arrested.

Maitland said she was pepper sprayed again while she was sitting in the back of the police cruiser. Keats said it was because Maitland was yelling and smearing blood from her injury on the inside of the vehicle.

The prosecutor said Maitland was behaving aggressively – screaming, swearing and waving her arms in the air when Const. Unger tried to arrest her.

Maitland told the court that Const. Unger threw her against the cruiser before forcing her into the vehicle. “They opened the door and threw me in head first … then they kicked me in the butt,” she told the court.

Keats asked for details about the hours leading up to the parking lot altercation and the soft-spoken woman said she didn’t remember much of the evening.

She told the court she’d been to the Raven pub for several hours that night.

An ambulance attendant testified she told him she had consumed 12 beer.

Keats told the court the two officers had previously responded to a call to the woman’s apartment that evening where Maitland and her fiance were fighting loudly.

Maitland testified she had no memory of their initial visit.

After police left, Maitland and her fiance continued arguing. Maitland said she cut her arm in two places when she hit a window twice. Both Maitland and her fiance said her arm was bleeding profusely when she left the apartment.

Her fiance told the court they were arguing because he disapproved of her drinking. A Type 1 diabetic, Maitland was also taking medication for anxiety and depression.

She said she had not taken her scheduled insulin that night. She told the judge that the medication she’s taken for seven years to treat anxiety and depression affects her memory.

“It makes things a little more fuzzy,” she said.

The fiance said Maitland was extremely intoxicated and he’d been unable to control her. He became flushed and cried as he told the court about watching Maitland interact with the police after she’d been pepper sprayed the first time.

“I couldn’t believe what I was witnessing,” he told the court. “He lifted his boot and kicked her in the butt and started laughing to the other officer.”

An ambulance arrived after Maitland was restrained in the police cruiser. The fiance said he told the driver of the ambulance about Maitland’s medical condition.

Another ambulance attendant, Craig MacLean, testified Maitland resisted treatment, and was swearing and spitting as he tried to assist her.

When questioned by defence lawyer Jay Bran, MacLean said her combative attitude may have been caused by her diabetic state.

When asked about her behaviour in the police cruiser, the ambulance and the hospital, Maitland said she was confused and couldn’t see because the pepper spray had gotten in her eyes.

“I’m not really sure what I was doing because I couldn’t see … I was yelling and screaming because I was in pain,” she said. “My head hurt, my neck hurt, my throat, eyes (and) nose were burning,”

She said she regained her vision after a doctor treated her at the hospital. The injury to her wrist required eight stitches.

After being treated at the hospital, Maitland spent more than eight hours in the drunk tank.

She testified she later received medical attention for an injured toe, which she said was broken by one of the police officers during her arrest.

Maitland said she couldn’t work for two weeks because her job as a cleaner at the hospital required her to be on her feet for long periods of time.

The trial had originally begun April 2, but was adjourned until Aug. 26 and continued until last Friday. The trial resumes Sept. 11.

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DEPRESSION MED: Amnesia: Woman Can’t Remember Taking Money: Canada

Paragraph 19 reads:  “Boone said she had no explanation as to what happened to the money, although she told the court she had been suffering from depression at the time, and was taking some medication that may have affected her memory.”

SSRI Stories note:  Amnesia is listed as a Frequent side-effect of SSRI antidepressants in the Physicians Desk Reference.

http://bugleobserver.canadaeast.com/news/article/770522

Woman shows up for trial with ‘lost’ cash

Published Tuesday August 25th, 2009

Nackawic woman found not guilty of stealing community fundraising, but judge finds her story ‘fishy’

A provincial court judge said he could not convict a Nackawic woman of theft, despite finding her testimony unbelievable.

Judge John J. Walsh announced his decision in a Woodstock courtroom Friday morning, finding Julie Boone, 34, not guilty of the crime of theft under $5,000.

“Her explanations were not logical, nor were they rational,” the judge said as he read his decision.

Boone’s trial began in May, as former members of the Nackawic Community Days committee took the stand, testifying about the disappearance of approximately $800 raised at a dance in 2007, a dance held to raise money for Nackawic Community Days, a dance where Boone worked the door and was supposed to deposit the funds raised into an account for the committee.

But somewhere along the way, the money was lost, or, as the Crown alleged, stolen by Boone.

On the first day of the trial back in May, another former committee member, Julie Brown, testified the dance had been Boone’s idea.

Brown said when the committee met following the dance, in June 2007, Boone told the committee she’d dropped the money in the night deposit box at the Scotiabank branch in Nackawic, a total of about $800.

But according to Brown, a bank statement didn’t show the deposit.

Later on, it was learned an envelope containing receipts had been dropped in the night deposit slot at the CIBC branch in Nackawic, which is situated in the same mall as the Scotiabank.

Brown told the court Boone was evasive as the committee tried to track the money down.

“Every time I talked to her there was a new excuse,” Brown said.

Brown said the money was never found or recovered.

The trial was adjourned to Aug. 19, at which time, Boone took the stand in her own defence.

According to Boone, she had worked the door at the Saturday dance by herself, although she said there were supposed to be two other volunteers, but they didn’t show up.

Following the dance, Boone said she’d placed the money in an envelope, which she would deposit the following Monday.

Boone said she’d placed the envelope under the front seat of her car for safekeeping.

The day after the dance, a Sunday, Boone said she decided she’d deposit the money. She said she’d been told by a neighbour about a series of break-ins to vehicles in the area, and decided the money should go to the bank sooner rather than later.

“In my haste, I put it in the wrong bank,” Boone said, offering an explanation as to why an envelope containing receipts and not the money from the dance ended up at the CIBC.

Boone said she had no explanation as to what happened to the money, although she told the court she had been suffering from depression at the time, and was taking some medication that may have affected her memory.

Boone said she thought she may have sent the money out west by accident. She said she had sent some photos of one of her children to the father of the child, but thought she may have sent the money. She said after communication with the father, she determined the money had not gone west.

So from June 2007 to January 2009, the money remained missing.

But Boone made a startling revelation during her testimony.

It seems the vehicle she’d been driving at the time of the dance had been passed to her sister, then to her father, and in January 2009, was at her parents’ home.

Boone said she had been trying to retrace her steps, contacting anyone she may have dealt with in June 2007 as she continued to try and locate the money.

Boone said she had gone to the vehicle and thoroughly searched it. She said under the trunk of the car, where the spare tire is kept, she located a file folder. According to Boone, the folder contained papers relating to her work on the Community Days committee. She said there was also an envelope containing a significant sum of money, which she said she realized was the money from the dance.

Boone said she had no explanation for how the envelope ended up in the trunk of her car.

“I wish I did,” she said.

Boone produced the envelope in court, to the surprise of Crown prosecutor Christopher Lavigne.

Lavigne told Judge Walsh he’d never seen the envelope before, and wouldn’t be able to consent to entering the envelope into evidence without an opportunity to examine the contents.

Upon examining the contents, Lavigne found the envelope contained $780.50. Of that total, $20.50 was what remained of a float Boone had the night of the dance. The rest was from ticket sales.

During cross-examination, Lavigne said he found it unusual that every bill in the envelope was dated 2004. Boone said she’d never taken the money out of the envelope after she found it, and had never looked at the dates on the bills.

In making final arguments, Boone’s lawyer, Brent Dickinson, said his client’s story was consistent throughout her testimony, despite the Crown’s attempts to poke holes in it.

While the judge agreed the story was consistent, he still found it troubling. “Her story is, quite frankly, fishy,” Judge Walsh said. “It raises a lot of alarm bells.”

But when giving his decision, Judge Walsh said he had reasonable doubt about Boone’s guilt.

“Can I reject her evidence outright?” the judge asked. “I find I can’t.”

Based on the reasonable doubt, Boone was found not guilty. Both Lavigne and Dickinson agreed the money should be returned to the Nackawic Community Days committee.

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4/08/2001 – A&E's Investigative Reports-Drugging our children

From one of our subscribers in Canada we have been notified that A&E’s
Investigative Reports will air a program regarding the drug experiments on
our kids. It will be on Monday, April 9/01. It is 6 or 7 pm Pacific time.

Synopsis adds make such comments as:

1. Has the drug experiments on our kids gone wild?

2. Our nation drugs its’ kids more than any other country in the world.
(“personally, I include Canada with the States”)

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