ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Police Officer Suicide After Only Days on Samples: NJ

Last two paragraphs read:  “Cillo tried to socialize
normally with his wife and family for the next few days — going dancing and to
a football game — but also sought help through the Cop-to-Cop crisis hotline.
He met with a hotline social worker and his own family physician, who
prescribed sleeping pills and gave him samples of anti-depressant
medications.
Still feeling confused and anxious on Aug.
27,
he went to Morristown Memorial Hospital. One physician gave him
medication to calm him down and an appointment was set for him to see a
psychiatrist in a few days after he denied suicidal thoughts, court records
said.”

On Aug. 28, the day he died, a hospital social
worker called Cillo at home to check on his welfare and he responded that he was
doing better. His wife brought the children to dental appointments, and upon
returning home, found a suicide note. She called police, who went
to the home and discovered Cillo in the
basement.”

http://www.dailyrecord.com/article/20090911/COMMUNITIES/309110001/1005/NEWS01/Wrongful+death+trial+begins+over+Harding+officer+s+suicide

Wrongful death trial begins over Harding officer‘s suicide

By Peggy Wright • Staff Writer • September 11, 2009

A civil trial
is set to start Monday on a wrongful death lawsuit filed by the widow of a
Harding police officer who hanged himself in 2003, a day after he was screened
at Morristown Memorial Hospital for suicidal ideations but not
admitted.

A jury of four men and four women was selected by Thursday
afternoon to hear the wrongful death//medical malpractice claims, and opening
trial statements are set to begin Monday before Superior Court Judge W. Hunt
Dumont in Morristown. At issue is whether the hospital, through a social worker,
registered nurse and psychiatrist named as defendants, was negligent and
breached a duty of care to Harding Officer James Cillo Jr. on Aug. 27,
2003.

Cillo, the 39-year-old son of retired Mendham Police Chief James
Cillo Sr., hanged himself in the basement of his Washington Township home. He
left his widow, Janet, and three daughters, who then were ages 11, 10 and
5.

A key issue in the case is whether hospital staff and its crisis
intervention workers who saw or evaluated Cillo on Aug. 27, 2003, were told that
he had given all his personal firearms to his father for safekeeping, and
stashed his service weapon at police headquarters. Cillo did not use a gun to
end his life, but attorney Donald Belsole, who is handling the case for the
widow, contends hospital personnel should have scrutinized Cillo more closely
for suicidal symptoms if they knew he willingly gave up his weapons.

The
hospital defendants, represented by attorneys Kenneth Fost and Michael Bubb,
contend their clients did all they could to properly evaluate Cillo, who
ultimately declined when asked whether he wanted to be admitted to Morristown
Memorial. Cillo was accompanied to the hospital by his wife of 15 years and his
father, the retired chief.

The lawsuit traces Cillo’s anxiety and
depressed state of mind back to Aug. 17, 2003, 11 days before his death. Working
a midnight shift, he handled a case of a Harding resident who shot his disabled
horse to try to end its suffering but didn’t kill the creature. Cillo responded
to the scene but failed to immediately seize the resident’s firearm or check
whether it was registered. He was chastised by his police chief for this lapse
and feared he would be fired. He grew anxious and couldn’t concentrate or sleep,
according to court records.

Cillo tried to socialize normally with his
wife and family for the next few days — going dancing and to a football game —
but also sought help through the Cop-to-Cop crisis hotline. He met with a
hotline social worker and his own family physician, who prescribed sleeping
pills and gave him samples of anti-depressant medications. Still feeling
confused and anxious on Aug. 27, he went to Morristown Memorial Hospital. One
physician gave him medication to calm him down and an appointment was set for
him to see a psychiatrist in a few days after he denied suicidal thoughts, court
records said.

On Aug. 28, the day he died, a hospital social worker
called Cillo at home to check on his welfare and he responded that he was doing
better. His wife brought the children to dental appointments, and upon returning
home, found a suicide note. She called police, who went to the home and
discovered Cillo in the basement.

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Murder-Suicide: Father Kills Son (22) & Self: California

Last paragraph reads:  “The victims are reportedly Ardo
Novarro, 55, and his 22-year-old son, Noel. Neighbors said the father had
been taking antidepressants a
nd appeared grief-stricken over the
death of his wife earlier in the year.”

http://www.760kfmb.com/Global/story.asp?S=11121686

Police investigating possible murdersuicide in Paradise
Hills

Posted: Sep 13, 2009 11:37 AM CDT Updated: Sep 13,
2009 12:01 PM CDT
[]

Autopsies are scheduled Saturday for a father and son believed to
have been killed in a murdersuicide in Paradise Hills.

A friend who
went to check on the men in a house on Sylvy Way near Omega Drive looked in a
window, saw what appeared to be two bodies and called 911 about 2 p.m. Saturday,
according to the Medical Examiner’s Office.

Neighbors said they heard
several shots coming from the home Wednesday night. Authorities said a handgun
was found near the bodies.

The victims are reportedly Ardo Novarro, 55,
and his 22-year-old son, Noel. Neighbors said the father had been taking

antidepressants and appeared grief-stricken over the death of his wife earlier
in the year.

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: MURDER/SUICIDE: FATHER KILLS YOUNG SON & SELF: CA

Last paragraph reads:  “The victims are reportedly Ardo
Novarro, 55, and his 22-year-old son, Noel. Neighbors said the father had
been taking antidepressants a
nd appeared grief-stricken over the
death of his wife earlier in the year.”

http://www.760kfmb.com/Global/story.asp?S=11121686

Police investigating possible murdersuicide in Paradise
Hills

Posted: Sep 13, 2009 11:37 AM CDT Updated: Sep 13,
2009 12:01 PM CDT
[]

Autopsies are scheduled Saturday for a father and son believed to
have been killed in a murdersuicide in Paradise Hills.

A friend who
went to check on the men in a house on Sylvy Way near Omega Drive looked in a
window, saw what appeared to be two bodies and called 911 about 2 p.m. Saturday,
according to the Medical Examiner’s Office.

Neighbors said they heard
several shots coming from the home Wednesday night. Authorities said a handgun
was found near the bodies.

The victims are reportedly Ardo Novarro, 55,
and his 22-year-old son, Noel. Neighbors said the father had been taking

antidepressants and appeared grief-stricken over the death of his wife earlier
in the year.

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Police Stop Man From Committing Suicide: England

Paragraphs two and three read: “The attorney for Coram resident Brandon Hampson says he plans to argue that his client became violent and beat Lisa Essling on Aug. 25, 2006, because he stopped taking the popular antidepressant Zoloft days before the attack.”

“Nassau County District Court Judge Rhonda Fischer said Friday that she will allow a defense witness to testify that withdrawl from the antidepressant can cause a person to become aggressive.”

http://www.newsday.com/ny-judge-to-allow-zoloft-defense-in-assault-case-1.1388026

NY judge to allow “Zoloft defense” in assault case

August 22, 2009 By The Associated Press

HEMPSTEAD, N.Y. (AP) A Long Island judge has said she will allow a man accused of punching and kicking his former girlfriend to use the so-called “Zoloft defense.”

The attorney for Coram resident Brandon Hampson says he plans to argue that his client became violent and beat Lisa Essling on Aug. 25, 2006, because he stopped taking the popular antidepressant Zoloft days before the attack.

Nassau County District Court Judge Rhonda Fischer said Friday that she will allow a defense witness to testify that withdrawl from the antidepressant can cause a person to become aggressive.

Prosecutors say they strongly disagree with the court’s decision.

Zoloft manufacturer Pfizer Inc. has said there’s not evidence to suggest that discontinuing the drug can cause violent behavior.

___

Information from: Newsday, http://www.newsday.com

Copyright 2009 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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